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pallidin

Dual power supplies for Space Exploration

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pallidin

"Developing and Improving RPS Technology
Seven generations of RPS have been flown in space 
by the United States since 1961, powering 26 missions 
that have enabled world-renowned scientific explora-
tion of the Moon, the Sun, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, 
Uranus, Neptune, and—soon—Pluto."

Source: NASA, .pdf

So, yes, many flights have and continue to use both solar and RPS, as opposed to what a certain moderator proclaims.

Wonder what Waspie has to say...

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Where does it say any of those flights used both solar and RPS? Your quote ONLY mentions RPS.

Where is the link to this NASA pdf?

Sorry pallidin but this proves absolutely nothing.

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pallidin

Good golly, nearly EVERY craft sent has had solar panels!!!!!!

Or is THAT in dispute? Not with me.

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Waspie_Dwarf
1 minute ago, pallidin said:

Good golly, nearly EVERY craft sent has had solar panels!!!!!!

Or is THAT in dispute? Not with me.

Yes that is in dispute because i9t is totally untrue.

NONE of the NASA missions that used RPS include solar panels. none, zero zip, zilch.

Show me the solar panels on Pioneers 10 and 11. Show me the solar panels on the Viking landers. Show me the solar panels on Curiosity. Show me the solar panels on the Voyagers or on New Horizons.

Go on do it or admit you are wrong.

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pallidin
11 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Where does it say any of those flights used both solar and RPS? Your quote ONLY mentions RPS.

Where is the link to this NASA pdf?

Sorry pallidin but this proves absolutely nothing.

Don't know how to link a .pdf

But I just tested and THIS works fine...

Google radioisotope-power-system.pdf

Takes one to a Google listing, top of page for NASA link.

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pallidin
7 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Yes that is in dispute because i9t is totally untrue.

NONE of the NASA missions that used RPS include solar panels. none, zero zip, zilch.

Show me the solar panels on Pioneers 10 and 11. Show me the solar panels on the Viking landers. Show me the solar panels on Curiosity. Show me the solar panels on the Voyagers or on New Horizons.

Go on do it or admit you are wrong.

No. Geeze, I didn't say ALL.

Pioneer, for example, strictly used RTG's... no solar.

Hope the info on the .pdf link is helpful.

 

Edited by pallidin

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Waspie_Dwarf

By the way here is the link you neglected to include:https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/fact_sheets/radioisotope-power-systems.pdf

Do you know how many times it includes mention of dual power sources? Exactly none.

So how do you think that something that doesn't mention dual power sources could possibly back up your claim that NASA uses dual power sources?

The pdf is about why NASA chose RPS for Curiosity. It even says this>

Quote
For most space exploration missions where sunlight is abundant, solar power has been the preferred choice. But as the environments at chosen destinations grow harsher, and missions evolve to be more demanding, it becomes more likely that effective power and heating for a spacecraft would require a Radioisotope Power System (RPS).

So basically your link is saying that RPS is used where solar is not appropriate. How does that make a case for dual power sources (I'll give you a clue, it doesn't).

Back in the original discussion I listed every NASA mission to use RPS. Not one of those mission used solar. I even listed the missions which, a,though solar did carry experimental RPS generators. Here is what I said:

Quote

Here is a list of the RTG powered spacecraft NASA has launched over the years:

  • Pioneer 10
  • Pioneer 11
  • Viking 1 Lander
  • Viking 2 Lander
  • Voyager 1
  • Voyager 2
  • Galileo
  • Cassini
  • New Horizons
  • Curiosity

Also the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Packages on Apollo's 12 - 17 used RTGs.

Do you know what they all have in common palladin? None of them were equipped with solar panels. Zero, zip, zilch.

In fact the only spacecraft NASA have launched with an RTG and solar panels was the Nimbus 3 weather satellite.

Transit 4A and Transit 4B launched, early US Navy navigation satellites, also had RTGs and solar panels.

 

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pallidin

Well, there you go, Waspie!

You just cited craft which does in fact have dual power systems.

Remind me, then, why are we "arguing" when you just cited use of dual-power systems?

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Waspie_Dwarf

More quotes from your source which totally contradict your argument:

Quote

The overall science goal of Curiosity is to enable scientists to determine the past and present potential of Mars to support microbial life at an intriguing location on the Red Planet. The MMRTG will provide the electrical power and onboard heat required for the mission to accomplish its ambitious goals over one Martian year (or about two Earth years), including the capability to explore latitudes that are too high for the rover to efficiently use solar power.

So Curiosity uses RPS because solar is not appropriate. Not much to support your claim there then.

There is also this:

Quote
Radioisotope power systems are used when they enable or significantly enhance missions to destinations where inadequate sunlight, harsh environmental conditions, or operational requirements make other electrical power systems infeasible

So once again your own source is saying the exact opposite of what you claim it is.

The pdf does not support your claim of dual power sources but rather provides an explanation of why NASA DOESN'T use both on single missions. RPS is only used where solar is not appropriate, Adding solar panels, which don't work, would be unnecessary complication and weight.

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Waspie_Dwarf
5 minutes ago, pallidin said:

Well, there you go, Waspie!

You just cited craft which does in fact have dual power systems.

Remind me, then, why are we "arguing" when you just cited use of dual-power systems?

Good grief pallidin do you remember nothing from the previous time you made this foolish argument?

I also said at the time:

Quote

In all three of the satellites that carried both systems the reason was that were testing the RTGs. They were essentially an experiment, not a power source.

here is a link to the original post:

 

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pallidin

So? I read that. I understand the limitations of D-P-S deployment.

But you just cited the Nimbus 3.

 

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Waspie_Dwarf
57 minutes ago, pallidin said:

So? I read that. I understand the limitations of D-P-S deployment.

But you just cited the Nimbus 3.

 

Which carried a RTG as an experiment not as a power source,,, so not a dual power source satellite.

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Waspie_Dwarf
9 hours ago, pallidin said:

So, yes, many flights have and continue to use both solar and RPS, as opposed to what a certain moderator proclaims

(my emphaisi)

This is what you claimed. How does a SINGLE case equate to MANY FLIGHTS?

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pallidin

But, you said there was NONE (in previous conversation)

 

Edited by pallidin

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