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zep73

"Emotional Explicitness"

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zep73

After years of observing both standard and social media, I have noticed a disturbing shift in popularity and attention during the latest years.

The issues in mind are, not only, emotional stories based on insignificant actions and gestures, but also mass mourning about small or big tragedies.

It seems to have become a modern signature of a good person to display grief and other feelings online. And by doing it you are "patted on the back" by your fellow "grievers", and included in "the good peoples club".

Has this, basically emotional explicitness, become more popular than physical explicitness?


Note: This is the second thread about this, but the first was deleted.
I am not allowed to use a certain (more common) word. Instead the word "explicitness" is used.

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joc

I'm pretty sure if I had a thread deleted I would not regurgitate it a second time...but ...that's just me...

On a different note...I have no idea what you are even talking about...but again...that's just me,,,

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Goddess of the Mist

I'm pretty sure I know what you mean. People who post about some emotional "tragedy" they are going through ~ pouring out their heart and soul usually about some really messy, dysfunctional situation they are in. You are almost embarrassed for them, and are wondering how they could've even got there (let alone why they'd want to share it with strangers), and yet their post is hugely popular and they get all of this "online" emotional support with bunches of comments and likes, etc? My take on it is this: people eat this stuff up.... the messier and weirder, the better. AND misery loves company. People like to see others struggling, it seems. Maybe it somehow makes them feel better? Who knows? 

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Wes83

On the other side of the coin, in a world where we are told to cheer up, expected to shelve our emotional baggage by our peers, employers, customers and sometimes even lovers... Alot of times even lovers... Online anonymity is quite appealing as an emotional outlet. Perhaps people stand in line to empathize rather than sympathize? 

Thankfully I have an actual physical human being to purge that stuff with that i trust with my darkest self. That allows her to get the best me as well...

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zep73
23 hours ago, joc said:

I'm pretty sure if I had a thread deleted I would not regurgitate it a second time...but ...that's just me...

I asked the moderator before posting it again. It was approved.

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Cookie Monster
On ‎03‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 10:43 PM, sci-nerd said:

After years of observing both standard and social media, I have noticed a disturbing shift in popularity and attention during the latest years.

The issues in mind are, not only, emotional stories based on insignificant actions and gestures, but also mass mourning about small or big tragedies.

It seems to have become a modern signature of a good person to display grief and other feelings online. And by doing it you are "patted on the back" by your fellow "grievers", and included in "the good peoples club".

Has this, basically emotional explicitness, become more popular than physical explicitness?


Note: This is the second thread about this, but the first was deleted.
I am not allowed to use a certain (more common) word. Instead the word "explicitness" is used.

Can you give a more clear example what you are discussing?

With the Indonesian tsunami in 2012 I laughed at that, the wave of emotion going through society didnt get me. But with the Leicester owner dying in a helicopter crash that I thought was terrible. I felt for the family of the guy. I dont know why it existed for one but not the other.

It had nothing to do with the media or the news stories on either. If there is a reason for the two different reactions then I`m not conscious of it. I`m also not fake so I do not pretend to display grief.

Edited by RabidMongoose
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Not A Rockstar

A lot of people are very isolated in life, for various reasons, and the internet allows them to make contact within the parameters they feel more secure in. If they feel the need to express pains or losses and some also feel able to respond to that I do not see the problem, nor do I care, frankly. For some, this is all they really have, and through it a few find a way to reach out on the physical level later and do better. Online IS real life. Those are real people posting and (sometimes) hurting or afraid and acting like the internet is not "real" is a fiction. It is mental and emotional versus physical and emotional however. Damage can be done. So can easing a sense of solitude and fear and sharing that the feelings are more universal than the person asking may have realized at the time. They are not alone after all.

If it is excessive IMO, I just don't keep reading.

I was on a forum where several posters went ape talking about their pregnancies in detail and blow by blow and many enjoyed the heck out of it. I wanted to gag. I just left the thread and socialized elsewhere. There was not a thing wrong with them, the issue is mine. Not for me to say they were wrong to enjoy that topic immensely. (grossly excessive IMO, but, I get to vote with my feet, not my mouth, the way I was raised.)

I think the same thing about those who feel the need to police what others post and think or express to extremes. If you do not like it, agree, or enjoy it, go somewhere else. If you have some right to post where you want and say what you want, so does everyone else. None of us are more special than anyone else. 

JMO.

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zep73
On 5/11/2018 at 4:59 PM, RabidMongoose said:

Can you give a more clear example what you are discussing?

With the Indonesian tsunami in 2012 I laughed at that, the wave of emotion going through society didnt get me. But with the Leicester owner dying in a helicopter crash that I thought was terrible. I felt for the family of the guy. I dont know why it existed for one but not the other.

It had nothing to do with the media or the news stories on either. If there is a reason for the two different reactions then I`m not conscious of it. I`m also not fake so I do not pretend to display grief.

I'm not talking about individual responses to events, like you describe, but more the "common choir response" seen everywhere these days.

This "choir" decides if we should weep, be sad or be angry. They practically run #MeToo. They set the agenda of the worlds emotions online.

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Cookie Monster
11 minutes ago, sci-nerd said:

I'm not talking about individual responses to events, like you describe, but more the "common choir response" seen everywhere these days.

This "choir" decides if we should weep, be sad or be angry. They practically run #MeToo. They set the agenda of the worlds emotions online.

You mean the what the media says we should feel?

I dont think it works on people to be honest. It doesnt work on you, me, or anyone else, except those already caught up in it.

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Podo

I don't see a problem with people expressing their emotions online. If that's what they feel comfortable with, go for it. If I don't like it, I just don't read it.

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Carlos Allende

In the UK today, we have a story about five people having been arrested on a public order offence (but then released on bail) after burning a effigy of Grenfell Tower (the London tower block that caught fire last year, killing dozens).

It's weird the feelings that stirs up in me. People are *****. It's not the same as being malicious. For all we know, those bonfire goons might all have super-low IQs. Waste of police resources? I think so yes.  I can understand why the general public would be horrified by the video, but in the scheme of human emotions, it makes no odds. It's got the exact same vibe as this:

One time, I was breaking up with a girlfriend and she said in disgust, 'Ugh! You're not going to _cry_ are you? There are plenty of other girls who like you'.

And then I had to patiently explain, it wasn't me or her I might start crying over, but the idea of something as fundamental and clearly-defined as love getting destroyed by the universe, or reality itself. She still didn't understand the concept. If someone breaks a social taboo, and it's not breaking any major law, you've probably got two choices: either keep schtum or punch them, but _don't_ go crying to your local news or social media.  

Sometimes I wonder about the future of localised consciousness in mankind. I'm sure it's cool to be an all-seeing, SJW Borg, but not to the exclusion of everything else, surely? 

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