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Piney

Huge Crater Discovered in Greenland.

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Doc Socks Junior

They say younger than 3 million, so that'd put it Pliocene at oldest. Of course, that's just based on morphology.

Quote from the paper:

Quote

The sum of these tentative age constraints suggests that the Hiawatha impact crater formed during the Pleistocene, as this age is most consistent with inferences from presently available data. An impact before the Pleistocene cannot clearly explain the combination of the relative freshness of the crater’s morphology and the ice sheet’s apparently ongoing equilibration with the presence of the crater.

 

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Piney
3 minutes ago, Socks Junior said:

They say younger than 3 million, so that'd put it Pliocene at oldest. Of course, that's just based on morphology.

 

But we didn't find anything in any pine barren islands from 12,000 years ago. Just Eocene stuff from Chesapeake and Tom's. So it was really early. 

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Carnoferox
14 minutes ago, Piney said:

I'm thinking it's Eocene. Same as the Chesapeake and Tom's River craters @Carnoferox

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/11/181114160042.htm

Socks is right about the authors estimating a Pleistocene age. 

http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/11/eaar8173

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Piney
2 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

Socks is right about the authors estimating a Pleistocene age. 

 

I know, but I hope they find a debris field in context to give a exact date. 

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Carnoferox
2 minutes ago, Piney said:

I know, but I hope they find a debris field in context to give a exact date. 

Now I'm just waiting for some catastrophist nonsense to get attached to this crater.

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Doc Socks Junior
6 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

Now I'm just waiting for some catastrophist nonsense to get attached to this crater.

The proposed age range does contain the Younger Dryas ;)

And thanks for the link, I meant to add it to my original post.

Edited by Socks Junior
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Piney
2 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

Now I'm just waiting for some catastrophist nonsense to get attached to this crater.

yeah........:wacko: 

I guesstamate 40-60,000 years ago.... maybe.  Pre- people in North America, that's for sure, and certainly before the glacial winds stripped the loess and exposed the Miocene sands in the Pine Barrens areas.

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Doc Socks Junior

Should be able to narrow down with some North Atlantic drill cores. Sed layers should pick up an ejecta layer. Can scan in the posited age range. They've definitely got the age control on 'em.

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Piney
23 minutes ago, Socks Junior said:

Should be able to narrow down with some North Atlantic drill cores. Sed layers should pick up an ejecta layer. Can scan in the posited age range. They've definitely got the age control on 'em.

That's how they narrowed down the ejecta field here from the Chesapeake and Tom's. It stretched straight into Virginia and clammers found scattered zeuglodon bones from New Jersey down. 

It makes me wonder about the Iron ejecta I found on the Batso River though. If it wasn't from the Miocene. 

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lost_shaman

Would this explain the tiny iron sphericals that some have suggested led to the demise of Mastodons in North America?  That "Ice" impact theory has been around for a long time but it has always been suggested to have occurred 12-13,000 years ago but no-one has ever found the crater to support the hypothesis.

Edited by lost_shaman

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Piney
5 hours ago, lost_shaman said:

Would this explain the tiny iron sphericals that some have suggested led to the demise of Mastodons in North America?  That "Ice" impact theory has been around for a long time but it has always been suggested to have occurred 12-13,000 years ago but no-one has ever found the crater to support the hypothesis.

Your thinking of Mammoths and there is no big kill sites or scattered bones.

The sphericals turned out to be from the Chesapeake impact, which was too early. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chesapeake_Bay_impact_crater

https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70018511

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Doug1o29

I'm wondering if the pieces of an iron meteorite found on Meteorite Island might have originated from this impact,  Inuit living nearby were using them to make arrowheads and harpoons.  The Perry expedition brought a 31-ton piece back to New York with them.

Doug

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Doug1o29
9 hours ago, lost_shaman said:

Would this explain the tiny iron sphericals that some have suggested led to the demise of Mastodons in North America?  That "Ice" impact theory has been around for a long time but it has always been suggested to have occurred 12-13,000 years ago but no-one has ever found the crater to support the hypothesis.

Maybe, but first we have to put an age on that crater and that may be hard to do, at least until the ice melts.

Doug

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Piney
31 minutes ago, Doug1o29 said:

I'm wondering if the pieces of an iron meteorite found on Meteorite Island might have originated from this impact,  Inuit living nearby were using them to make arrowheads and harpoons.  The Perry expedition brought a 31-ton piece back to New York with them.

Doug

I was thinking about that and going to post a link at lunch. :lol:

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Hammerclaw
20 hours ago, Piney said:

I'm thinking it's Eocene. Same as the Chesapeake and Tom's River craters @Carnoferox

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/11/181114160042.htm

And possibly as young as 12000 years. Younger Dryas Impact proponents are probably enthralled.

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Piney
14 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

And possibly as young as 12000 years. Younger Dryas Impact proponents are probably enthralled.

Don't start old man! <_< 

:lol:

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Seti42

Now, this is interesting. I look forward to conclusive dating of this crater.

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AllPossible

47 million atomic bombs sounds wrong for a less then 1 mile rock. Couple hundred thousand ya but no way thats 50 million. I know E=MC2 but still come on. 

Edited by AllPossible
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Doug1o29
18 hours ago, Hammerclaw said:

And possibly as young as 12000 years. Younger Dryas Impact proponents are probably enthralled.

I'm enthralled, but let's wait until we get a date on it before we jump off the deep end.

Doug

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Piney

Wellll..........that didn't take too long. :o 

 

 

 @Carnoferox

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Alien Origins
On 11/14/2018 at 6:22 PM, Carnoferox said:

Now I'm just waiting for some catastrophist nonsense to get attached to this crater.

Could very well happen especially if the Tin Foil Hatters start attaching government conspiracies to it.

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lost_shaman
On 11/15/2018 at 4:19 AM, Piney said:

Your thinking of Mammoths and there is no big kill sites or scattered bones.

The sphericals turned out to be from the Chesapeake impact, which was too early. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chesapeake_Bay_impact_crater

https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70018511

I was thinking about the microspherules that are associated with a number of Clovis kill sites. 

Evidence for an extraterrestrial impact 12,900 years ago that contributed to the megafaunal extinctions and the Younger Dryas cooling 

R. B. Firestone, A. West, J. P. Kennett, L. Becker, T. E. Bunch, Z. S. Revay, P. H. Schultz, T. Belgya, D. J. Kennett, J. M. Erlandson, O. J. Dickenson, A. C. Goodyear, R. S. Harris, G. A. Howard, J. B. Kloosterman, P. Lechler, P. A. Mayewski, J. Montgomery, R. Poreda, T. Darrah, S. S. Que Hee, A. R. Smith, A. Stich, W. Topping, J. H. Wittke, and W. S. Wolbach

PNAS October 9, 2007 104 (41) 16016-16021; https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0706977104

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Doug1o29
On 11/14/2018 at 5:22 PM, Carnoferox said:

Now I'm just waiting for some catastrophist nonsense to get attached to this crater.

An impact this large is, by definition, catastrophic.

Doug

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