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Still Waters

How “brunch in the forest” became Thanksgiving

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Still Waters

Native Americans are only one percent of the population, but their images are on our boxes of butter and cornstarch. Their names are used to sell motorcycles and cars. And one of their brief encounters with English colonists is the basis of one of our biggest holidays.

The story of Thanksgiving definitely evolved over time. The First Thanksgiving of 1621 happened but with little notice or attention. Curators at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian like to call it “a brunch in the forest.” Yes, it took place between Native Americans and Pilgrims. But the event was not exempt from history’s subjectivity.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/how-unremarkable-brunch-forest-turned-thanksgiving-we-know-180970811/

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Piney
1 hour ago, Still Waters said:

Native Americans are only one percent of the population

Three percent now. But not enough for our vote to count. :lol:

Quote

 Smithsonian's Paul Chaat Smith.

Hey @Swede   It's Mister "The Dene have always been in the Southwest"!  :lol:

Lying jackass....

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Swede
On 11/15/2018 at 6:07 PM, Piney said:

Three percent now. But not enough for our vote to count. :lol:

Hey @Swede   It's Mister "The Dene have always been in the Southwest"!  :lol:

Lying jackass....

This is amusing, particularly in regards to his comments regarding revisionism. As Jayle has pointed out on a number of occasions, there are indeed aspects of history that are subjective and thus open to various interpretations. However, hard data is hard data. No revision needed.

.

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Piney
4 minutes ago, Swede said:

This is amusing, particularly in regards to his comments regarding revisionism. As Jayle has pointed out on a number of occasions, there are indeed aspects of history that are subjective and thus open to various interpretations. However, hard data is hard data. No revision needed.

Those face scalps, cannibalized Ancestral Puebloans and projectile points didn't appear out of nowhere. :whistle:

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