Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Still Waters

Kilogram gets a new definition

6 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Still Waters

Scientists have changed the way the kilogram is defined.

Currently, it is defined by the weight of a platinum-based ingot called "Le Grand K" which is locked away in a safe in Paris.

On Friday, researchers meeting in Versailles voted to get rid of it in favour of defining a kilogram in terms of an electric current.

The decision was made at the General Conference on Weights and Measures.

But some scientists, such as Perdi Williams at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK, have expressed mixed feelings about the change.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46143399

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
sci-nerd

Yes, but the question "Do I look fat in this?", will never stop, will it?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Taun

So the new way to measure is to use an electromagnet to "equalize" the force (i.e. the mass I suppose)...

Would this be a constant?... Would the EM force needed be the same at different altitudes? In the micro-gravity of space?  If someone is more "up to speed" on this than I am (i.e. just about anyone else on this site :)) perhaps you could answer?

 

(edited because I can't spell for beans...)

Edited by Taun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
danydandan
20 minutes ago, Taun said:

So the new way to measure is to use an electromagnet to "equalize" the force (i.e. the mass I suppose)...

Would this be a constant?... Would the EM force needed be the same at different altitudes? In the micro-gravity of space?  If someone is more "up to speed" on this than I am (i.e. just about anyone else on this site :)) perhaps you could answer?

 

(edited because I can't spell for beans...)

All SI standards are going to be defined as constants from the 20th of May 2019. It's based specifically on Planck's constant and it's done by linking the energy a photon carries with it's electromagnetic wave. How this is done is kinda cool, instrument makers are going to make a fortune, basically a scale will measure balance weight on one side and the electromagnetic force on the other. This has been successfully done. The upside of this is, is that this force will never change over time.

https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2018/11/14/18072368/kilogram-kibble-redefine-weight-science

That article is very good. 

https://www.nist.gov/si-redefinition/kilogram-disseminating-new-kilogram

This is from the horse's mouth.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
spud the mackem
18 minutes ago, Taun said:

So the new way to measure is to use an electromagnet to "equalize" the force (i.e. the mass I suppose)...

Would this be a constant?... Would the EM force needed be the same at different altitudes? In the micro-gravity of space?  If someone is more "up to speed" on this than I am (i.e. just about anyone else on this site :)) perhaps you could answer?

 

(edited because I can't spell for beans...)

Lets screw things up and go back to ounces, pounds, stone's, hundred weight's and tons, I guess that would really annoy the French.hehe. I still measure items in feet and inches , when I say 6 feet 6inches my Grandkids say how long is that, and I'm still 11 stones 4 pounds heavy. Happy Days.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztek

will it be called a french kilo? will it still weigh the same as normal people's kilo?

Edited by aztek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.