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China to venture to the far side of the Moon

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Barkinghorse

How would they communicate with it? Woulndt it be a black spot?

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seanjo
21 minutes ago, Barkinghorse said:

How would they communicate with it? Woulndt it be a black spot?

The Moon does rotate, we just can't see the dark side, because it never gets any sunlight, when the Moon is half or quarter the dark side is pointing at us, ish...

But I expect there may be an orbiter as well.

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toast
2 minutes ago, seanjo said:

, because it never gets any sunlight ...

Thats incorrect

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toast
28 minutes ago, Barkinghorse said:

How would they communicate with it? Woulndt it be a black spot?

From the article:

Quote

To maintain communications with Earth, a satellite will be used to relay data and messages back and forth.

 

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seanjo
Just now, toast said:

Thats incorrect

I thought the Moon was tidally locked with regards to the Sun, but I stand corrected.

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toast
Just now, seanjo said:

I thought the Moon was tidally locked with regards to the Sun, but I stand corrected.

The moon is tidally locked to the Earth and the "rear side" of the Moon is always illuminated by the Sun when the Moon`s rear side is directed to the Sun, while orbiting Earth. Just think about a solar eclipse.

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seanjo

Yeah, I was talking utter b******s...apart from the orbiter...

 

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Not A Rockstar
13 minutes ago, seanjo said:

Yeah, I was talking utter b******s...apart from the orbiter...

 

eh, I learn a lot from you Seanjo and thought the same until @toast corrected you. One of those head slaps of logic. Of course it is not dark, but...why did I never make the connection? LOL. Thanks Toast. 

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toast
1 minute ago, Not A Rockstar said:

eh, I learn a lot from you Seanjo and thought the same until @toast corrected you. One of those head slaps of logic. Of course it is not dark, but...why did I never make the connection? LOL. Thanks Toast. 

Ack-Ack! Ack!

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Gecks

My initial reaction to this was what advantages does the far side of the moon possess to our side. However after reading the article theres potentially a lot of knowledge to gain. Interested for future developments on this.

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Robotic Jew

Can I go?

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Myles

Is the "bang for the buck" there for this mission?

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UFOwatcher

Thanks for NOT calling it the Dark Side as so many websites do. The Far side is correct.

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Mystify

My question is what is China's REAL purpose for going to the far side?  Most governments will only tell media what they want us to know or think. Not the truth. In my opinion there is always a hidden agenda with governments. I've seen countless video's of UFO's flying on the other side. I do watch secureteam10 quite a bit and feel like this will be discussed soon no doubt.

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toast
2 hours ago, Mystify said:

My question is what is China's REAL purpose for going to the far side? 

As usual: research.

Quote

Most governments will only tell media what they want us to know or think. Not the truth.

Wrong. Bilderberg/Rothschild/Illuminati tell the governments what to tell to the media. Example: Reichsflugscheibe.

Quote

In my opinion there is always a hidden agenda with governments.

Blah.

Quote

I've seen countless video's of UFO's flying on the other side.

But these objects aren't UFOs, the objects are seagulls, simple seagulls.

Quote

I do watch secureteam10 quite a bit

There are hundreds of stupid "UFO-Channels" on YT, but you prefer the most stupid one, ST10? You are screwed.

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Waspie_Dwarf
On 12/7/2018 at 3:36 PM, Myles said:

Is the "bang for the buck" there for this mission?

What do you mean by "bang for the buck"?

This is a scientific mission, not a commercial one. Only after it is over will it be possible to determine how successful it was, but whatever it discovers will add to the sum of human knowledge,

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Myles
1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

What do you mean by "bang for the buck"?

This is a scientific mission, not a commercial one. Only after it is over will it be possible to determine how successful it was, but whatever it discovers will add to the sum of human knowledge,

I just wondered if there was enough info to gain to warrant the money spent.   Of course there will much info to gain.

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Waspie_Dwarf
34 minutes ago, Myles said:

I just wondered if there was enough info to gain to warrant the money spent.   Of course there will much info to gain.

Aren't you answering your own question here?

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Myles
1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Aren't you answering your own question here?

Not really.   Although NASA would gain information by landing on the moon 3 times in 2019, I don't think they would get enough bang for their buck by doing so.   

Now the Voyager 2 has really set the bar high for bang for your buck as we are still getting info from it.  

Not arguing, just clarifying where I was coming from.  

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Waspie_Dwarf
1 hour ago, Myles said:

Not arguing, just clarifying where I was coming from.  

It doesn't really clarify anything. Your "bang for the bucks" comment is just as vague as in your first post. You still have not managed to give a definition of what you mean by it? I am not convinced that you know exactly what you mean by "bang for the bucks".

By what measure are you determining which discoveries are worth the money? It seems it boils down to simply your opinion.

I say again, only after the completion of a mission is it possible to determine how successful it has been. Even if it discovers nothing new about the moon that alone will be data which will tell the scientists something.

Since no one has explored the far side of the Moon before the techniques for communicating with the spacecraft are new. As such the technology may be invaluable in the future.

Since Chang'e 4 is landing in a totally unexplored region of the Moon any information it sends back will be new information. Since it is landing in a totally unexplored region of the Moon it is impossible to determine in advance what it will discover. Since it is impossible to determine in advance what it will discover it seems tom me that the question, " Is the "bang for the buck" there for this mission?" is unanswerable and meaningless for the moment.

As for claiming to not be answering your own question you admit that a spacecraft designed to gain info has much info to gain. You are basically stating that the craft is likely to do what it is designed to do and collect new information. How is that not answering your own question? How is that not "bang for the bucks"?

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf
typos.
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Myles
16 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

It doesn't really clarify anything. Your "bang for the bucks" comment is just as vague as in your first post. You still have not managed to give a definition of what you mean by it? I am not convinced that you know exactly what you mean by "bang for the bucks".

By what measure are you determining which discoveries are worth the money? It seems it boils down to simply your opinion.

I say again, only after the completion of a mission is it possible to determine how successful it has been. Even if it discovers nothing new about the moon that alone will be data which will tell the scientists something.

Since no one has explored the far side of the Moon before the techniques for communicating with the spacecraft are new. As such the technology may be invaluable in the future.

Since Chang'e 4 is landing in a totally unexplored region of the Moon any information it sends back will be new information. Since it is landing in a totally unexplored region of the Moon it is impossible to determine in advance what it will discover. Since it is impossible to determine in advance what it will discover it seems tom me that the question, " Is the "bang for the buck" there for this mission?" is unanswerable and meaningless for the moment.

As for claiming to not be answering your own question you admit that a spacecraft designed to gain info has much info to gain. You are basically stating that the craft is likely to do what it is designed to do and collect new information. How is that not answering your own question? How is that not "bang for the bucks"?

Good gads!   Give it a rest.   Now you are being difficult just to be a pain in the rear.   If you don't know how "bang for your buck" is commonly used, that is on you.  

I'm done here.

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An0n1m0us

Say goodbye to the Chang'e-4. There are too many entities in that region already, to allow another. My guess is that that Chang'e-4 will lose communication sometime after nearing the far side. 

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Peter B
On 12/12/2018 at 7:45 AM, Myles said:

Not really.   Although NASA would gain information by landing on the moon 3 times in 2019, I don't think they would get enough bang for their buck by doing so.   

Now the Voyager 2 has really set the bar high for bang for your buck as we are still getting info from it.  

Not arguing, just clarifying where I was coming from.  

Well, for one thing (hastily consulting Wikipedia because the news articles weren't clear exactly where it landed) it landed at one of the deepest points on the surface of the Moon - in a crater inside the South Pole-Aitken basin, which is one of the largest impact sites on the Moon. That means there's a chance they might be able to sample rocks from the Moon's mantle, which in turn would provide a lot of information about both the inside of the Moon and the process of its formation.

Also, when the Chinese launched the relay spacecraft into lunar orbit, they also launched a couple of smaller spacecraft with equipment to scan space at very low frequencies, which apparently has never been done before. Who knows what discoveries may be made?

So, like the Voyager spacecraft, I wouldn't be surprised if the 'bang for buck' will be determined in retrospect by things scientists never expected to discover. And that's what makes these sorts of missions so exciting.

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Robotic Jew
On 12/12/2018 at 7:10 PM, atom2084 said:

Say goodbye to the Chang'e-4. There are too many entities in that region already, to allow another. My guess is that that Chang'e-4 will lose communication sometime after nearing the far side. 

are you suggesting there is a large population of aliens living near where this mission landed?

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