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bison

Light Curve of Boyajian's Star

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bison

 It's been pretty well established that whatever is sporadically obscuring the light from Boyajian's Star, it consists of very tiny particles, which have been likened to extremely fine dust. A newly published analysis of the varying light output of Boyajian's Star suggests that it may contain fairly complex, symmetrical structures. The data displays of two of the star's  light-dipping episodes show oval  or round areas near the center, with opposed semicircles, equidistant from them, on either side. Just how dust could assume such patterns is not known.  A short, informative video about this analysis is linked below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Q6uOT17A8s

 

Edited by bison
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L.A.T.1961

Are scientists getting younger or is it me :D 

It is an intriguing object. This method will create multiple design options and there is no way of knowing which is the closest representation to the actual set up unfortunately. If the light output could be measured more accurately and over a longer period it could narrow the options down a bit.

      

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Earl.Of.Trumps

Well, she sure made it perfectly clear... it ain't clear!

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bison

Emily Sanford spoke about their computer-based system seeking out the patterns that best fit the data. I'm assuming that the patterns shown in the video represent that 'best fit'. Why else single them out like that? In any case, she promised further information bearing on the accuracy of the analysis. 

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bison

The scientific paper on the newly announced analysis of Boyajian's Star is linked below. 

The authors are satisfied that the symmetrical, fairly complex features in their resulting displays indicate real, physical structures. The question remains--what has caused fine particles of matter to assume these complex forms, instead of spreading out evenly, as might be expected?

Various, highly improbable objects have been proposed, such as immense ringed planets, or similarly large comets with spiraling debris tails. We have no independent evidence that such things can even exist. The main problem is the scale of the star's dimming-- up to 22 percent. This is hugely out of all proportion with objects of planetary size or cometary mass.

The concept of 'smart dust'-- minute technological devices intended for various uses, is already being discussed in scientific circles. Let us leave open the possibility, and not such an unreasonable one, either, that immense fleets of such devices are in orbit of Boyajian's Star, and that this is what has been sporadically dimming that star's light, as seen from Earth.   

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1812.01618.pdf     

Edited by bison

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bison

A striking thing about these symmetrical patterns in the star's  light is that aren't perfectly so. For example, one of the crescents is closer to the central oval, and thicker, that the opposite one. ThIs looks less like the high symmetry associated with many astronomical objects, and more like the approximate symmetry of a grid of city streets, wherein blocks may be of noticeably different lengths, despite the overall organized pattern. These patterns may be viewed on pages 21 and 22 of the scientific paper, linked in the last post.   

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