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Eldorado

The Christmas Dinner made from roadkill

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Eldorado

A handyman has confessed to scouring the roads for dead animals after revealing he and his girlfriend will serve a Christmas dinner made entirely from roadkill.

Jim Alexander, 41, has already collected nearly 50 fresh animal corpses from roads near his home where he butchers the meat himself.

He and girlfriend Betina Bradshaw, 54, will serve their ‘roast venison a la roadkill’ menu to their family and friends, which includes deer, pheasant, rabbits and even badgers.

Full article plus "Jim's top tips for sourcing safe roadkill":: https://metro.co.uk/2018/12/11/couple-serve-christmas-dinner-made-entirely-roadkill-8229682/?

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and then

I've seen an example of this  (on a smaller scale) a couple of miles from my front door.  I live in a semi-rural area and walk on long, dark county roads.  One night I saw some headlights approaching, then they seemed to just stop.  After a while, you get kind of a sixth sense about certain situations and when a vehicle takes a LONG time to approach and pass, it can mean it's time to deal with some redneck teens or drunks.  Doesn't happen often but you have to be aware of it.  This particular night I found that the strange-acting truck had a middle-aged couple in it that was creeping along at about 2-3 miles an hour and as they got close the driver asked me if I'd seen a truck hit a deer while I was out walking.  "No, can't say I have"...  He says well if you see a deer along here I'd appreciate it if you'd wave.  Eventually, I did walk past the poor thing and sure enough, the guy comes back.  I helped him load the deer on the truck and he offered me some of the venison.  Now, I love venison but the temperature that evening was in the 60's F.  That's what made it so bizarre.  Fresh deer, elk, etc. properly cleaned is no different than what is killed in a hunt but the temperature and length of time since the animal died is critical to being safe with consuming it.  I passed on the deer ;)  

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Not A Rockstar

Yes, we have had 2 deer hit along here the past week. If you like venison, 'tis the season.

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Captain Risky
11 hours ago, and then said:

I've seen an example of this  (on a smaller scale) a couple of miles from my front door.  I live in a semi-rural area and walk on long, dark county roads.  One night I saw some headlights approaching, then they seemed to just stop.  After a while, you get kind of a sixth sense about certain situations and when a vehicle takes a LONG time to approach and pass, it can mean it's time to deal with some redneck teens or drunks.  Doesn't happen often but you have to be aware of it.  This particular night I found that the strange-acting truck had a middle-aged couple in it that was creeping along at about 2-3 miles an hour and as they got close the driver asked me if I'd seen a truck hit a deer while I was out walking.  "No, can't say I have"...  He says well if you see a deer along here I'd appreciate it if you'd wave.  Eventually, I did walk past the poor thing and sure enough, the guy comes back.  I helped him load the deer on the truck and he offered me some of the venison.  Now, I love venison but the temperature that evening was in the 60's F.  That's what made it so bizarre.  Fresh deer, elk, etc. properly cleaned is no different than what is killed in a hunt but the temperature and length of time since the animal died is critical to being safe with consuming it.  I passed on the deer ;)  

I see your argument about eating road kill. But It just doesn’t seem the same as shooting it. Maybe it’s not knowing when it died that makes it all guess work and so repulsive.  “hunting road kill” with a pickup might become the new red neck trend. Anyway i’ll pass on this type of Christmas dinner.

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and then
2 hours ago, Captain Risky said:

I see your argument about eating road kill. But It just doesn’t seem the same as shooting it. Maybe it’s not knowing when it died that makes it all guess work and so repulsive.  “hunting road kill” with a pickup might become the new red neck trend. Anyway i’ll pass on this type of Christmas dinner.

Nah.  No self-respecting redneck would use his truck when his shotgun is available ;)  Seriously, though, depending on the air temperature, the time that elapses after death can be the difference between safe and very dangerous meat.  I also don't drink out of stagnant bodies of water.  The odds are heavy against a good outcome.

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Impedancer

Sounds yummy for my tummy and does he check the meat for trinchinella?

Edited by Avalanche

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