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UM-Bot

Was megalodon wiped out by a supernova ?

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Jon the frog

And whales ? Megalodon can stay deep and whales need to breath... whale became that big after the demise of large animals? Maybe water doesn't shield cosmic ray at all... cool idea still.

 

Edited by Jon the frog
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AllPossible

Incredible that a star light years away could cause the cancer rate to skyrocket.. I've heard gamma ray bursts could be thousands of light years away and melt our planet if were in the path... 

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skrubby

or oh i dont know a lack of food due to ocean life dying and whale's being like **** this sh** im out

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Myles

Seems a bit like a shot in the dark to me.    

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RabidMongoose
3 hours ago, UM-Bot said:

A new study has suggested that the world's largest ever shark may have been wiped out by an exploding star.

https://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/324073/was-megalodon-wiped-out-by-a-supernova

That is highly alarming because Betelguese is an estimated 600-1000 light years away, is 2 million times the mass of the sun, and is on the verge of supernova.

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seanjo

Water is a very good blocker of radiation...sooo maybe what did it was other species it preyed on that were maybe more surface/land-based being affected which had the effect of depriving the Megalodon of its food source...

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy
42 minutes ago, RabidMongoose said:

That is highly alarming because Betelguese is an estimated 600-1000 light years away, is 2 million times the mass of the sun, and is on the verge of supernova.

Betelgeuse isn't 2 million times the mass of the Sun, more likely about 20 times (So you are slightly off :whistle:), its estimated to go supernova "within the next million years" and it is unlikely that it will be powerfull enough to do any damage, merely a spectacular lightshow.

I don't think you need to be highly alarmed about Betelguese.

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Ares_Zeusson
46 minutes ago, Noteverythingisaconspiracy said:

Betelgeuse isn't 2 million times the mass of the Sun, more likely about 20 times (So you are slightly off :whistle:), its estimated to go supernova "within the next million years" and it is unlikely that it will be powerfull enough to do any damage, merely a spectacular lightshow.

I don't think you need to be highly alarmed about Betelguese.

Right? We should be much more concerned about the death star orbiting our planet & whatever the heck The Black Knight Satellite is. Space junk my ass.

Edited by Kid_Marx

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RabidMongoose
1 hour ago, Noteverythingisaconspiracy said:

Betelgeuse isn't 2 million times the mass of the Sun, more likely about 20 times (So you are slightly off :whistle:), its estimated to go supernova "within the next million years" and it is unlikely that it will be powerfull enough to do any damage, merely a spectacular lightshow.

I don't think you need to be highly alarmed about Betelguese.

Why do people post replies here telling others they are wrong without even checking the facts? Here is a link to some information on Betelgeuse https://www.reference.com/science/hot-betelgeuse-compared-sun-efc0d976d8b621cb

It says Betelgeuse is 600 million miles wide which is 965 million kilometres. Just to put that into perspective Jupiter is 800 million kilometres away from our sun so if it was switched with Betelgeuse Jupiter would be swallowed up. That is an absolutely humongous star.

In fact the you can see Betelgeuse outside with your naked eye (its one of the stars in the Orion Constellation) and the reason why you can see it despite it being an estimated 600-1000 light years away is because of its absolutely humongous size. It is one of the largest stars in the universe.

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cyclopes500

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/81/Betelgeuse_Plume_eso0927d.jpg/800px-Betelgeuse_Plume_eso0927d.jpg

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L.A.T.1961

Minimum safe distance from a SN is thought to be 50 - 100 Light years. If they are further away than that effects would be limited on Earth. So a SN that caused an extinction would have to be within this range. It should not be too difficult to find the smoking gun if true? 

https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/supernove-distance 

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy
3 hours ago, RabidMongoose said:

Why do people post replies here telling others they are wrong without even checking the facts? Here is a link to some information on Betelgeuse https://www.reference.com/science/hot-betelgeuse-compared-sun-efc0d976d8b621cb

It says Betelgeuse is 600 million miles wide which is 965 million kilometres. Just to put that into perspective Jupiter is 800 million kilometres away from our sun so if it was switched with Betelgeuse Jupiter would be swallowed up. That is an absolutely humongous star.

In fact the you can see Betelgeuse outside with your naked eye (its one of the stars in the Orion Constellation) and the reason why you can see it despite it being an estimated 600-1000 light years away is because of its absolutely humongous size. It is one of the largest stars in the universe.

Maybe you should read what I responded to before you get all upset about it ?

You said the mass of Betelgeuse was 2 million times the Sun. What you are refering to here is the physical size of the Sun. Those are two different things aren't they ?

Btw your link says nothing about the mass of Betelguese.

The reason why a star can be 2 million times larger than the Sun and yet "only" 20 times as massive is because red super giant stars are much less dense than yellow dwarfs like our Sun. Betelguese is massive in size, but very low in density, except for the core.

The most massive star we know about is about 315 times the mass of the Sun, not anywhere near 2 million. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betelgeuse

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_supergiant_star

So either you know little of the subject or you meant size instead of mass.

If it is the latter why not just say you made mistake instead of attacking me for responding to what you actually  wrote?

If it is the former I suggest you do a little research before commenting.

Edited by Noteverythingisaconspiracy
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Tatetopa
4 hours ago, Noteverythingisaconspiracy said:

I don't think you need to be highly alarmed about Betelguese.

Just don't call out his name three time or he will appear in your study.

 

image.jpeg

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy
2 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

Just don't call out his name three time or he will appear in your study.

 

image.jpeg

Betelguese

Betelguese

Betelguese

Edit: Gotta go, someone is knocking on the door.

Edited by Noteverythingisaconspiracy
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Jaded1
5 hours ago, Kid_Marx said:

Right? We should be much more concerned about the death star orbiting our planet & whatever the heck The Black Knight Satellite is. Space junk my ass.

I don't normally comment but you surely are on some kind of hard drug.

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Amanda Evans

But was it wiped out?

 

runs away giggling...

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pbarosso

how does radiation penetrate the ocean depths?

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Impedancer

More or less the lack of food that killed a large predator as such.

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Ell

The Pliocene-Pleistocene Boundary

Published:
January 01, 1965

 

Quote

In natural exposures and drill cores from rocks and oceanic sediments at several localities throughout the world, the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary is based on evidence of climatic cooling followed by conspicuous fluctuation. The data consist mainly of marine-invertebrate fossil faunas, oxygen-isotope thermometry ratios, and terrestrial plant remains. At most localities there is evidence for transition from warmer to cooler climate rather than an abrupt break.

Maybe the amount of heat produced by either the Sun or Earth was affected by an effect of a star going supernova. Or maybe not.

 

In my opinion, though, the extinction event was a direct consequence of cold, not of a higher incidence of cancer - which latter I consider to be a ridiculous idea.

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RoofGardener

Hmm.... I'm really not convinced. A radiation blast of that magnitude would have had a devastating effect on land mammals... and possibly even plants. There would have been many other signs of such a catastrophe. But - so far as I am aware - no such signs have been detected ? 

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Seti42

Interesting. I'd never thought that larger creatures would be more susceptible to radiation...But it makes sense now that I think about it. It also makes cheesy 50's and 60's sci-fi where radiation makes things bigger even more ironic and funny.

Edited by Seti42

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cyclopes500

Its a double edged sword. On one side you've got the cancer causing effects. On the other it also causes mutations which are the driving force of evolution. Even more when a mutant retro virus gets jammed in egg and sperm DNA. Also where that virus came from there are others. Billions of them all being sniffed up by the same spieces of animals. They all get trapped in the right place in their dna and in one breeding season a new species is born. One with enough genetic variation from the different parents already to boost its survival chances.

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MindfulInquirer

huh... that, I wouldn't have thought of.

Either way that thing was a monster. It probably could've eaten Chthulu.

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Sameerr

And for that film 'The Meg', i didn't really much felt like seeing a Megalodon movie. Jason Statham is a good hero but the movie didn't seemed much interesting. It's a known thing that in movies, the large animals gets exaggerated. The Megalodon is 75 ft in the film and perhaps they killed 2 big megalodon easily made me lose some interest and i thought the music which played after the movie ended was not suitable for a thriller movie. I think someone should make a good movie or documentary for Megalodon.I would say that the film about white sperm whale,"In the heart of the sea" is better than 'The Meg'.

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