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Will Due

Building the Pyramid by floating the blocks

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Will Due

 

Anybody see this video? It's an interesting idea of how they built the Great Pyramid using water and floating the blocks up to the top without using cranes or pulling them on rollers. As well as how they got everything level.

 

 

 

Edited by Will Due

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Likely Guy

Geyser?

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Will Due
19 minutes ago, Kenemet said:

They couldn't build a successful dam, but somehow managed to pump and direct water uphill? 

And they invented hydraulic pumps capable of lifting a column of water higher than 32 feet...but still got water to their fields by using the shadouf and continued using the shadouf for thousands of years after?

shaduf1.jpg

Seems to me that if they actually had that technology, they would have used it then to do a lot of other things, like bringing water to individual houses and to fields without resorting to human labor.

 

Did you watch the video? It isn't long. About 22 minutes. It tells what their theory is of how they got the water to the top of the pyramid near the end of the video.

 

 

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Sir Wearer of Hats

I would NOT want to be the poor sod standing in stagnating Nile Water while transferring the blocks from A to B.

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Golden Duck
7 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

I would NOT want to be the poor sod standing in stagnating Nile Water while transferring the blocks from A to B.

Why not? It was pleasant. YouTube says so.

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Sir Wearer of Hats
31 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

I've seen this 'solution' before. The problem comes with a misunderstanding the weight and pressure of water. First getting the water up that far and the amount of weight it would generate on the 'intermediate' gates - the video shows the gates moving magically out and in - with no indication of how that would be done. Their would be a heck of a lot of weight on that gate before it moved. Nor is there a method to determine where the block would be at any given point.

Interestingly I am not aware of any record of the Romans - or the Chinese who were great hydrologist doing this. Perhaps the OP could provide us information on where this type of system was used before?

At 138 meters a column of water that high would generate a bit over 200 PSI or 1400 kPa at the bottom.

No stinky footed bumpkin could do something like that. 

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Kenemet
3 hours ago, Will Due said:

Did you watch the video? It isn't long. About 22 minutes. It tells what their theory is of how they got the water to the top of the pyramid near the end of the video.

That's 22 minutes of my life that I won't get back.  Limestone does not "harden" when it's exposed to the CO2 in the atmosphere... and the rest of the statements there are equally absurd.  The limestone isn't from Tura... that's only the bright casing stone.  The rest of the stone came from right there on Giza.

And the method they're describing would take quite a bit longer than 20 years.

Plus, there'd be traces of it all around and they'd have used it to build other things.  And they wouldn't have used bucket lifters to water their fields (as they've done for thousands of years.)

Edited by Kenemet
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Noteverythingisaconspiracy
9 hours ago, Will Due said:

 

Anybody see this video? It's an interesting idea of how they built the Great Pyramid using water and floating the blocks up to the top without using cranes or pulling them on rollers. As well as how they got everything level.

 

 

 

Building the infrastructure would be a massive engineering accomplishment, yet we have no piece of evidence or a single mention of this

In any event the vast majority of the stones came from quarries next to the pyramids, not transported from the Nile as the video suggests.

Khafre-quarry-EgyptArchive.jpg

I think that the ending of the video shows us the real purpose: "For a deeper look into the water shaft theory please read the book" So all you have to do is pay $ 52,96. (Amazon):whistle:

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Will Due
16 minutes ago, Noteverythingisaconspiracy said:

Building the infrastructure would be a massive engineering accomplishment, yet we have no piece of evidence or a single mention of this

In any event the vast majority of the stones came from quarries next to the pyramids, not transported from the Nile as the video suggests.

Khafre-quarry-EgyptArchive.jpg

I think that the ending of the video shows us the real purpose: "For a deeper look into the water shaft theory please read the book" So all you have to do is pay $ 52,96. (Amazon):whistle:

 

Yeah I noticed that too, and thought the same thing lol.

 

 

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Earl.Of.Trumps

A lot of things look good "on paper".

Floating 2 ton blocks of stone with 5 timbers...?  Sincerely doubt it!    Look at 1/100 scale. A 40 lb. block of stone being floated by 5 halves of a broom handle.  NYET!

The proof is always in the pudding.  If you'd like a little humor in your all-things-egyptology life, read up how Nissan of Japan funded teams of 100 men to cut stone at giza, transport it, and erect a 60 foot high pyramid. After they got the stones to the nile, they fell flat on every aspect of the job henceforth. In the account I read, they could not move the ONE ton blocks one inch over the sand.

Ya, everything looks simple "on paper". :wacko:

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Kenemet
2 hours ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

A lot of things look good "on paper".

Floating 2 ton blocks of stone with 5 timbers...?  Sincerely doubt it!    Look at 1/100 scale. A 40 lb. block of stone being floated by 5 halves of a broom handle.  NYET!

The proof is always in the pudding.  If you'd like a little humor in your all-things-egyptology life, read up how Nissan of Japan funded teams of 100 men to cut stone at giza, transport it, and erect a 60 foot high pyramid. After they got the stones to the nile, they fell flat on every aspect of the job henceforth. In the account I read, they could not move the ONE ton blocks one inch over the sand.

Ya, everything looks simple "on paper". :wacko:

Agree with your statements, but am curious about the story of Nissan and the pyramid.  My google-fu turned up only one reference to this and the site didn't seem very reliable.  Also... the Egyptians didn't get most of the stone from elsewhere; they simply had to haul it across the plateau rock to the pyramid itself, not a quarter mile away.

Got a link for me?

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Kenemet
6 hours ago, Noteverythingisaconspiracy said:

Building the infrastructure would be a massive engineering accomplishment, yet we have no piece of evidence or a single mention of this

In any event the vast majority of the stones came from quarries next to the pyramids, not transported from the Nile as the video suggests.

Khafre-quarry-EgyptArchive.jpg

I think that the ending of the video shows us the real purpose: "For a deeper look into the water shaft theory please read the book" So all you have to do is pay $ 52,96. (Amazon):whistle:

I also forgot to comment about the use of sun-dried mud bricks as retainers/foundation for pools of water.  Because that doesn't work for very long.  

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Earl.Of.Trumps
1 hour ago, Kenemet said:

Agree with your statements, but am curious about the story of Nissan and the pyramid.  My google-fu turned up only one reference to this and the site didn't seem very reliable.  Also... the Egyptians didn't get most of the stone from elsewhere; they simply had to haul it across the plateau rock to the pyramid itself, not a quarter mile away.

Got a link for me?

I have no link. Max Toth was the speaker. Am I thrown out of the parade? lol

He claims the Japanese teams needed a boat to get the blocks across the nile,  a truck to haul them over the sand, and a heavy lift vehicle to lift them into place.

Edited by Earl.Of.Trumps

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jmccr8

Hi Will

Seems to me that we had a thread about this topic a few years ago.

jmccr8 

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kmt_sesh
7 hours ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

A lot of things look good "on paper".

Floating 2 ton blocks of stone with 5 timbers...?  Sincerely doubt it!    Look at 1/100 scale. A 40 lb. block of stone being floated by 5 halves of a broom handle.  NYET!

The proof is always in the pudding.  If you'd like a little humor in your all-things-egyptology life, read up how Nissan of Japan funded teams of 100 men to cut stone at giza, transport it, and erect a 60 foot high pyramid. After they got the stones to the nile, they fell flat on every aspect of the job henceforth. In the account I read, they could not move the ONE ton blocks one inch over the sand.

Ya, everything looks simple "on paper". :wacko:

I would question Mr. Nissan's entire project, then. Mark Lehner assembled a team many years ago to build a miniature pyramid from start to finish for a TV program called "This Old Pyramid." The special showed around fourteen Arabic men moving a two- or three-ton-block all over the place. This included up a hill to approximate ramps. They did encounter a number of problems, but it was an interesting special. They even addressed how to move the block around the corner of their rising pyramid, which was one of the trickiest problems.

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy
1 hour ago, kmt_sesh said:

I would question Mr. Nissan's entire project, then. Mark Lehner assembled a team many years ago to build a miniature pyramid from start to finish for a TV program called "This Old Pyramid." The special showed around fourteen Arabic men moving a two- or three-ton-block all over the place. This included up a hill to approximate ramps. They did encounter a number of problems, but it was an interesting special. They even addressed how to move the block around the corner of their rising pyramid, which was one of the trickiest problems.

One might even think that the ancient Egyptian learned a few tricks as they built the older pyramids.

Nah that just crazy talk, they were clearly too stupid to learn anything........:rolleyes:

Edited by Noteverythingisaconspiracy
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Harte
8 hours ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

A lot of things look good "on paper".

Floating 2 ton blocks of stone with 5 timbers...?  Sincerely doubt it!    Look at 1/100 scale. A 40 lb. block of stone being floated by 5 halves of a broom handle.  NYET!

The proof is always in the pudding.  If you'd like a little humor in your all-things-egyptology life, read up how Nissan of Japan funded teams of 100 men to cut stone at giza, transport it, and erect a 60 foot high pyramid. After they got the stones to the nile, they fell flat on every aspect of the job henceforth. In the account I read, they could not move the ONE ton blocks one inch over the sand.

Ya, everything looks simple "on paper". :wacko:

You read wrong. They managed to construct about half of it using only ancient methods, but gave up and brought in some equipment to help finish it.

Lehner did about the same - but wasn't trying to actually build a big one, just demonstrate quarrying and moving and piling.

Harte

 

Edited by Harte
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Harte
6 hours ago, Kenemet said:

Agree with your statements, but am curious about the story of Nissan and the pyramid.  My google-fu turned up only one reference to this and the site didn't seem very reliable.  Also... the Egyptians didn't get most of the stone from elsewhere; they simply had to haul it across the plateau rock to the pyramid itself, not a quarter mile away.

Got a link for me?

Harte

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Kenemet
19 minutes ago, Harte said:

You read wrong. They managed to construct about half of it using only ancient methods, but gave up and brought in some equipment to help finish it.

Lehner did about the same - but wasn't trying to actually build a big one, just demonstrate quarrying and moving and piling.

Harte

 

That makes sense.  Probably lacked the manpower.

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kmt_sesh
59 minutes ago, Noteverythingisaconspiracy said:

One might even think that the ancient Egyptian learned a few tricks as they built the older pyramids.

Nah that just crazy talk, they were clearly too stupid to learn anything........:rolleyes:

Such is the fate of stinky-footed bumpkins.

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Tatetopa

No physical evidence  or mention of the causway infrastructure, yet the physics of water is still with us to vex college engineering students   even as it did the Egyptians. It is a  mistake to use scale models instead of calculations.  Hanslune is so correct. in his statements on pressure.  What looks easy in a 10 foot plastic pipe takes on a whole new dimension of difficulty when the pipe is 100 feet long or 400 feet long.  Consider the gates.  Think about it for a second, if the shaft is filled with water, water pressure will be equal on both sides of a gate.  Intermediate gates will not reduce the pressure at the bottom since water is in-compressible and transmits the pressure wonderfully.    A wooden sluice gate would be unable to withstand the pressure.  The video talks about the heavy roofing slabs.  The gates would need to be equally heavy.  Consider the weight of water on top of that gate,  If the shaft were 10' square, in addition to the weight of a 3' slab gate, there would be 1400 tons of water weight on top of the slab.  Reducing friction by putting grease on the slab is minor help.  How many oxen or men would it take to pull a 1400 ton gate open?  About the same number as it would take to pull 700 2 ton blocks up an incline I guess.

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Tatetopa

Also, I might add that atmospheric pressure is capable of supporting a water column  33 feet high if the top is sealed (turning over the glass in water, you see the air bubble on top, looks easy, as with a small model.)  Atmospheric pressure will not support a column of water 100 feet tall  even if the top is sealed perfectly.  What you get is 33 feet of water in the bottom of the tube and very low pressure air of near vacuum level in the top 66 feet of the tube.

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