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Still Waters

Blue tooth reveals artist from medieval times

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Still Waters

The weird habit of licking the end of a paintbrush has revealed new evidence about the life of an artist more than 900 years after her death.

Scientists found tiny blue paint flecks had accumulated on the teeth of a medieval German nun.

The particles of the rare lapis lazuli pigment likely collected as she touched the end of her brush with her tongue.

The researchers say it shows women were more involved in the illumination of sacred texts than previously thought.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46783610

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third_eye

precursor of Bluetooth or Blue Nuns I wonder ...

~

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freetoroam
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They set out to examine the bones of corpses at a medieval monastery in Dalheim, Germany.

The discovery indicates that women were playing a far more significant role in the writing and illustration of manuscripts at this time than has previously been recognised.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46783610

Considering they were examining the remains at a monastery where nuns were, it would not really be odd that the nuns were asigned to writing and illustrations. 

Nuns did similar work to monks, ok this is in England, but can not see why it would be any difference in Germany. 

 

Quote

Nuns, like monks, lived a very structured day in Medieval England. 

After this service, nuns would occupy themselves with work within the convent. This would be similar to what monks did in that nuns would work in the fields, the kitchen, the washroom or workshops.

https://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/medieval-england/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-nun/

Nice to see there was no discrimination because they were women, women were skilled back then too, so it would only seem right that they would be entrusted to use this pigment, at the end of the day, if you can not trust a nun!!!!!

Quote

The researchers say that only scribes and painters of exceptional skill would have been entrusted with the use of this highly prized pigment

.https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46783610

 

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Stubbly_Dooright
2 hours ago, Still Waters said:

The weird habit of licking the end of a paintbrush 

I wouldn't  :huh:  *shudder*

Quote

has revealed new evidence about the life of an artist more than 900 years after her death.

So yeah, despite my 'thoughts' on that, I think this is good, for it has revealed more in our ancient history. And thus, we learn more. :yes:  

And I agree with @freetoroam

16 minutes ago, freetoroam said:

Nice to see there was no discrimination because they were women, women were skilled back then too, so it would only seem right that they would be entrusted to use this pigment,

I agree and am glad to see it. And again, glad for this 'interesting' habit to help us unearth that women's roles can and have varied as much as men's. 

I initially read this during my usual news input online at breakfast this morning. I swore, from the article I was reading from, it mentioned how this woman showed no signs of having done hard work at all in her life, and I also thought it mentioned about how there were no signs of either suicide or homicide, ..........( ok, I may have hallucinated, blame the exotic coffee I was drinking. :w00t: ) so, I wondered how she died. Was it from licking the blue paint brush!?!?  :o  

Yeah, exotic coffee and hallucinations was my breakfast this morning. *shrugs* 

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freetoroam
5 minutes ago, Stubbly_Dooright said:

I wouldn't  :huh:  *shudder*

So yeah, despite my 'thoughts' on that, I think this is good, for it has revealed more in our ancient history. And thus, we learn more. :yes:  

And I agree with @freetoroam

I agree and am glad to see it. And again, glad for this 'interesting' habit to help us unearth that women's roles can and have varied as much as men's. 

I initially read this during my usual news input online at breakfast this morning. I swore, from the article I was reading from, it mentioned how this woman showed no signs of having done hard work at all in her life, and I also thought it mentioned about how there were no signs of either suicide or homicide, ..........( ok, I may have hallucinated, blame the exotic coffee I was drinking. :w00t: ) so, I wondered how she died. Was it from licking the blue paint brush!?!?  :o  

Yeah, exotic coffee and hallucinations was my breakfast this morning. *shrugs* 

Her age and lifetime  fell between 

Quote

According to radiocarbon dating, the woman had lived between 997 and 1162AD and was between 45-60 years old when she died. According to the authors, the woman was average in almost every aspect - except for what was stuck to her teeth.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46783610

 

60ish is not a bad age for them days.

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Stubbly_Dooright
1 hour ago, freetoroam said:
1 hour ago, Stubbly_Dooright said:

I wouldn't  :huh:  *shudder*

So yeah, despite my 'thoughts' on that, I think this is good, for it has revealed more in our ancient history. And thus, we learn more. :yes:  

And I agree with @freetoroam

I agree and am glad to see it. And again, glad for this 'interesting' habit to help us unearth that women's roles can and have varied as much as men's. 

I initially read this during my usual news input online at breakfast this morning. I swore, from the article I was reading from, it mentioned how this woman showed no signs of having done hard work at all in her life, and I also thought it mentioned about how there were no signs of either suicide or homicide, ..........( ok, I may have hallucinated, blame the exotic coffee I was drinking. :w00t: ) so, I wondered how she died. Was it from licking the blue paint brush!?!?  :o  

Yeah, exotic coffee and hallucinations was my breakfast this morning. *shrugs* 

Her age and lifetime  fell between 

Quote

According to radiocarbon dating, the woman had lived between 997 and 1162AD and was between 45-60 years old when she died. According to the authors, the woman was average in almost every aspect - except for what was stuck to her teeth.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46783610

 

60ish is not a bad age for them days.

I agree.

So, that is what I read, and then the exotic coffee wrote the rest....................................... :blush:  

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Impedancer

Is this the new Harald Bluetooth king over Denmark and Norway reign 958 -  986 . The Bluetooth wireless spec was named after him it even has a little younger futark bind rune as its logo

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