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Kenemet

Muldjewangk and Fabulous Night Panther

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Kenemet

While hunting up material for a "Fantastic Beasts" presentation, I came across a mention of the Muldjewangk of Australia, an interesting mythical creature that seems to be used as an enforcer of a taboo (don't play near the water after dark.)  Descriptions vary wildly, and it's not clear if there's just one of them or a whole tribe of them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muldjewangk

The Fabulous Night Panther of North America (Mishipeshu) is another of these taboo-enforcing creatures that keeps people away from dangerous waters... though the name suggests that it has a lot better sense of fashion and style than the poor old Muldjewangk who probably wanders around dressed in old seaweed.

 

Do you have a favorite taboo-enforcing mythological creature?

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Kenemet

My personal favorite is the Urmahluhllu (which I can never spell right), the proud and fastidious lion centaurs who guard the bathroom.

...as in the sacred chamber where you bathe before going into the temples.

They punished people who talked in the bathroom... which makes me wish we had them guarding the restrooms today, where everybody seems to think it's the best place to chat on a phone (honestly, who wants to listen to you pee?)

http://warriorsofmyth.wikia.com/wiki/Urmahlullu

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freetoroam

Bigfoot.

Given me a whole lot of fun on here. ;)

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Earl.Of.Trumps

Unlike other creatures held mythical by locals,, the elders say that Muldjewangk no longer inhabits the river system.

Very interesting.

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Kenemet
49 minutes ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

Unlike other creatures held mythical by locals,, the elders say that Muldjewangk no longer inhabits the river system.

Very interesting.

I think it got tired of the touists and the trash, personally.  

Or else it went off to consult with Fabulous Night Panther to see if it can get some snazzier outfits.

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sci-nerd

Little Red Riding Hood & The Big Bad Wolf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Riding_Hood#Interpretations

The wolf (probably) represents becoming a sexually active adult woman, and the story is also about who to trust.

It is an intriguing metaphor, because it leaves room for a wide variety of interpretations, besides the one I just made.

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Piney
1 hour ago, Kenemet said:

Do you have a favorite taboo-enforcing mythological creature?

Me. :yes:

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Piney
2 hours ago, Kenemet said:

The Fabulous Night Panther of North America (Mishipeshu) is another of these taboo-enforcing creatures that keeps people away from dangerous waters... though the name suggests that it has a lot better sense of fashion and style than the poor old Muldjewangk who probably wanders around dressed in old seaweed.

The personification of a river.

He could be a Water Panther or Horned Serpent depending on the tribe. His scales were mica which was put in a clam shell and buried on the riverside as a offering during a drought. He was the "Keeper of Copper" and all copper belonged to him we just "borrowed" it. 

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Kenemet
38 minutes ago, Piney said:

The personification of a river.

He could be a Water Panther or Horned Serpent depending on the tribe. His scales were mica which was put in a clam shell and buried on the riverside as a offering during a drought. He was the "Keeper of Copper" and all copper belonged to him we just "borrowed" it. 

Thank you!  People will love hearing that tidbit!

 

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Piney
27 minutes ago, Kenemet said:

Thank you!  People will love hearing that tidbit!

Once again telling outsiders and putting online things I'm not suppose to. :whistle:

2 hours ago, Piney said:

Me. :yes:

and that's why I'm not anymore. :yes:

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openozy
5 hours ago, sci-nerd said:

 

The wolf (probably) represents becoming a sexually active adult woman, and the story is also about who to trust.

 

5 hours ago, sci-nerd said:

Little Red Riding Hood & The Big Bad Wolf

What, did it have a granny fetish.

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openozy

The Mo-Fo of Menindee,guardian of the greatest Taboo.

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DebDandelion
6 hours ago, Piney said:

Me. :yes:

Dude. My new creature is you! Gonna use that . (with your blessing ) that was sooooo funny

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Carnoferox

@Piney

What do you think of the idea that the horns of the water panther/horned serpent were based on mammoth/mastodon tusks?

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Piney
1 minute ago, Carnoferox said:

@Piney

What do you think of the idea that the horns of the water panther/horned serpent were based on mammoth/mastodon tusks?

That's possible. I remember it had mica scales and quartz crystal eyes, but I don't remember any horn material. 

I have old Swedish and Quaker accounts from the 1630s to 1660s in the Salem Quarter archives describing "horned" rattlesnakes on Mantua Creek. Mantua Creek was his center of worship for the Southern Unami so I always though he was considered a larger version of them made from lithic material.

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Carnoferox
37 minutes ago, Piney said:

That's possible. I remember it had mica scales and quartz crystal eyes, but I don't remember any horn material. 

I have old Swedish and Quaker accounts from the 1630s to 1660s in the Salem Quarter archives describing "horned" rattlesnakes on Mantua Creek. Mantua Creek was his center of worship for the Southern Unami so I always though he was considered a larger version of them made from lithic material.

If you ever find mentions of ivory as horn material in these stories, let me know.

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