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Javelin found embedded in mammoth's rib

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Hammerclaw
3 minutes ago, Piney said:

The bow wasn't brought in until the Dine' migrated across the Bering Strait during the Early Woodland.  

The Mesoamericans along with the Algonquians have "Clovis genes". 

It's not surprising they brought legacy technologies with them, whenever they came. Weaving is an ancient technology arising in the old stone age, thus, they brought the backstrap loom with them, too. 

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Piney
1 minute ago, Hammerclaw said:

It's not surprising they brought legacy technologies with them, whenever they came. Weaving is an ancient technology arising in the old stone age, thus, they brought the backstrap loom with them, too. 

Windover Pond proved the Archaic folk were way more advanced then they first though.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windover_Archeological_Site

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Hammerclaw
10 minutes ago, Piney said:

Windover Pond proved the Archaic folk were way more advanced then they first though.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windover_Archeological_Site

The Americas were as well populated as the Old World, too. The relatively small tribes encountered by the English were remnants of great nations almost obliterated by Europeans diseases. Had that not been the case, history would have been quite different and European footholds in the New World much more difficult to establish and maintain. It would have been more like the British experience in India.

Edited by Hammerclaw
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Piney
11 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

The Americas were as well populated as the Old World, too. The relatively small tribes encountered by the English were remnants of great nations almost obliterated by Europeans diseases. Had that not been the case, history would have been quite different and European footholds in the New World much more difficult to establish and maintain. It would have been more like the British experience in India.

Read Charles Mann.

I'm more than familiar with the Great Dying and the Columbian Exchange. 2/3rds of my people died off in 5 waves of diseases. 3 recorded by the Swedes and South Jersey Quakers. 

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Hammerclaw
6 minutes ago, Piney said:

Read Charles Mann.

I'm more than familiar with the Great Dying and the Columbian Exchange. 2/3rds of my people died off in 5 waves of diseases. 3 recorded by the Swedes and South Jersey Quakers. 

That was the most recent devastation. It had been going on for a century or more prior. Spanish incursions in the Southeast reported a populous land full of villages and towns with fertile fields everywhere, crisscrossed by well established roads. This was wiped in a generation. The great mound building cultures abandoned their cities to wander and slowly rebuild their numbers only to be taken down again by the next disease. Only nuclear war could ravage human life so completely.

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Piney
15 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

That was the most recent devastation. It had been going on for a century or more prior. Spanish incursions in the Southeast reported a populous land full of villages and towns with fertile fields everywhere, crisscrossed by well established roads. This was wiped in a generation. The great mound building cultures abandoned their cities to wander and slowly rebuild their numbers only to be taken down again by the next disease. Only nuclear war could ravage human life so completely.

Since 1492, like the title of Mann's book. 

Savannah Island was a trading center with people from as far away as Ontario and Puerto Rico residing and trading there. Diseases wiped that out before the first English settlers.

Another group, The Shenks Ferry Culture, a possible Siouian people of Pennsylvannia  died out before contact. 

But the "vast wilderness" theory is still well liked in public schools.

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Hammerclaw
11 minutes ago, Piney said:

Since 1492, like the title of Mann's book. 

Savannah Island was a trading center with people from as far away as Ontario and Puerto Rico residing and trading there. Diseases wiped that out before the first English settlers.

Another group, The Shenks Ferry Culture, a possible Siouian people of Pennsylvannia  died out before contact. 

But the "vast wilderness" theory is still well liked in public schools.

A European concept. Most of what greeted Europeans on arrival was a human managed landscape. 

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Piney
1 minute ago, Hammerclaw said:

A European concept. Most of what greeted Europeans on arrival was a human managed landscape. 

Rutgers still can't reproduce our agro-forestry and land management techniques.

Mast trees followed tthe Early Archaic people as they traveled North. Water lotus was carried in by the Meadowood Culture. Maygrass by the Adena-Middlesex, Tomatillos and bottle gourds by the Piedmont Culture. 

 

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hetrodoxly

This video gives us a clue on how efficient  the spear can be, killing the elephant is at about the 4:30 mark, the video comes with a warning it's not very pleasant and might upset some people but this is what our ancestors had to do to survive.

 

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Hammerclaw
2 hours ago, Piney said:

Rutgers still can't reproduce our agro-forestry and land management techniques.

Mast trees followed tthe Early Archaic people as they traveled North. Water lotus was carried in by the Meadowood Culture. Maygrass by the Adena-Middlesex, Tomatillos and bottle gourds by the Piedmont Culture. 

 

Indians as did most Stone age peoples, groomed the land with fire, spreading grassland and keeping the forests open and park like. Whereever white people went, dense tanglewoods followed, because this practiced ceased.

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Piney
1 minute ago, Hammerclaw said:

Indians as did most Stone age peoples, groomed the land with fire, spreading grassland and keeping the forests open and park like. Whereever white people went, dense tanglewoods followed, because this practiced ceased.

You can walk through and camp in the old growth cedar swamps. They are quite a pleasure to wilderness camp in. 3rd and 4th gen swamps are impassable briar patches loaded with poison ivy and greenbriars.

But we burned our patch of Piney Woods when we were still allowed. Along with our pasture. 

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jmccr8
6 hours ago, Piney said:

Windover Pond proved the Archaic folk were way more advanced then they first though.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windover_Archeological_Site

Hi Piney

These people and this site were one of the first I ever looked into and it started a new curiosity about A American history for me. For those that are not familiar with the site, I am just adding this link for photos and other links with the pics.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=pictures+of+artifacts+from+the+Windover+Pond+site&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiwxbSfhYXgAhUAITQIHXEyBCcQsAR6BAgFEAE&biw=1264&bih=556

jmccr8

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Piney
22 minutes ago, jmccr8 said:

These people and this site were one of the first I ever looked into and it started a new curiosity about A American history for me. For those that are not familiar with the site, I am just adding this link for photos and other links with the pics.

 

We pulled a Middle Archaic canoe out of a cedar swamp with a wave breaking prow. The same design used on USCG interceptor boats. Which means the Piedmont Culture had ocean going canoes. Not those hollowed logs seen in Europe. 

It's on display at the Cumberland County Prehistory Museum but I don't think the pictures are online yet. 

 

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