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Earth's magnetic field was once near to collapse

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EBE Hybrid

Makes you realize how many variables have to line up to produce an ecosystem that can sustain life as we know it!

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Piney
1 hour ago, EBE Hybrid said:

Makes you realize how many variables have to line up to produce an ecosystem that can sustain life as we know it!

Our planet is so unusual it makes you wonder if we are it in technological life. 

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bison

That's pretty close to the start of the Cambrian Explosion, about 541 million years ago. This was when the diversity of life forms increased greatly, and most of the varieties of life we see today had their origin. I wonder if there could be any connection. 

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bison
3 minutes ago, Piney said:

Our planet is so unusual it makes you wonder if we are it in technological life. 

Out of an estimated 40 billion possibly habitable planets in our galaxy, I wouldn't be surprised if there were a still- large number that actually host technologically advanced civilizations. Earth is special to us, of course, but in the larger view it could be one of a great many. 

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Piney
1 minute ago, bison said:

Out of an estimated 40 billion possibly habitable planets in our galaxy, I wouldn't be surprised if there were a still- large number that actually host technologically advanced civilizations. Earth is special to us, of course, but in the larger view it could be one of a great many. 

The moon as our "rudder" kept the spin stable enough for higher life forms to develop.  

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Nnicolette

^personally i think detecting the magnetic field is a better approach to sniffing out planets with habitable surfaces, although the interiors may be more commonly habitable.
Hasnt there been a bit of fluctuation going on with our magnetic field currently? Has anyone ever seen the movie "the Core"?

Edited by Nnicolette
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bison
16 minutes ago, Piney said:

The moon as our "rudder" kept the spin stable enough for higher life forms to develop.  

Very true, it seems. Given the rain of planetesimals early in the history of our solar system, the sort of collision that gave rise to Earth's relatively large moon may not be such a rare thing elsewhere. We even have a second example in our own system, in Pluto and Charon.  

Edited by bison
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bison
16 minutes ago, Nnicolette said:

^personally i think detecting the magnetic field is a better approach to sniffing out planets with habitable surfaces, although the interiors may be more commonly habitable.
Hasnt there been a bit of fluctuation going on with our magnetic field currently? Has anyone ever seen the movie "the Core"?

I don't believe it's currently possible to detect habitable-planet-sized magnetic fields at interstellar distance. We might be able to have indirect evidence of them, such as auroras, once telescopes large enough to scrutinize planetary atmospheres come on line.

Edited by bison
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Doug1o29

We may be able to find planets with life by analyzing their atmospheres.  The James Webb Telescope is supposed to have that capacity.  It's something like two or three years from launch.

Doug

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bison

The weakening of Earth's magnetic field was apparently fairly brief, since it did not seem to cause the wholesale destruction of the atmosphere. The extra radiation that got through to the surface at that time could have been enough to cause a higher rate of genetic mutation. This might have led to the huge diversifying of life seen at about this time, which is called the Cambrian Explosion.  

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Jon the frog

So frail our existence is...

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