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Still Waters

Undiscovered Merlin tale fragments found

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Daughter of the Nine Moons

Hopefully they will publish the findings

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sci-nerd

It's interesting that the Brits in the 7th century, where Arthur is supposed to have lived and ruled, were not Christians. It took another 100 years, before the new religion had a firm grip on the general population.
And then, 100 years after Christianity had become standard, the viking raids started.

Only 100 years separates the mindset of the Brits and the Norsemen. They could have gotten along fine, if just the timing had been better!

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weneversolvedanything

I do hope they publish it! Arthurian literature is so interesting to me because the mindset is so different from, as said, the christian mindset that set too long after and then began to be thrown into almost all british lit.

Not that I have anything against Christianity! I just love the perspective without it.

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Captain Risky

I love Arthurian legends. I read somewhere that it’s the basis for the Knights Templar and other quasi religious orders.

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third_eye

This one is a good one too, something truly of the Isles before the Saxons, Normans and Vikings ....
 

Quote

 

~

Completed in 800 AD, the Book of Kells is the world's most famous and oldest book. The book is Ireland's most lavish and glorious of Ireland's illuminated ...
 
~
 
The Cathach is the oldest surviving manuscript written in Ireland and the second ... The name of the book derives from the Irish Gaelic word cath (pronounced ...

 

~

The oldest of all these books of miscellaneous literature is the Lebar-na-Heera, or the Book of the Dun Cow,* now in the Royal Irish Academy. By "the oldest" is meant that it was transcribed at an earlier time than any other remaining: but some books of later transcription contain pieces quite as old, or older.

 

~

 

 

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skliss
11 hours ago, third_eye said:

This one is a good one too, something truly of the Isles before the Saxons, Normans and Vikings ....
 

 

We saw the Book of Kells at Trinity College. The illustrations are beautiful. I bought postcards from their gift shop and put them in frames that I hung in my foyer.

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third_eye
43 minutes ago, skliss said:

We saw the Book of Kells at Trinity College. The illustrations are beautiful. I bought postcards from their gift shop and put them in frames that I hung in my foyer.

One of Ireland's greatest treasure ... I can totally understand why ...

THis Documentary on youtube might be of interest to you LINK

I enjoyed it immensely - Irelands Treasures Uncovered Alan Medeiros Espada • 107K views

It's about an hour long :)

~

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Ozymandias
15 hours ago, sci-nerd said:

It's interesting that the Brits in the 7th century, where Arthur is supposed to have lived and ruled, were not Christians. It took another 100 years, before the new religion had a firm grip on the general population.
And then, 100 years after Christianity had become standard, the viking raids started.

Only 100 years separates the mindset of the Brits and the Norsemen. They could have gotten along fine, if just the timing had been better!

Arthur, if he was a real individual, lived in either the late 5th or early 6th century, most likely the latter. First Viking raids on Britain occurred in 793. They are separated by 250 years.

Great find. As a young man I went through an Arthurian phase in which I studied all the theories about King Arthur. In the end I had to accept there was/is no evidence of any significance attesting to his reality. :( The Arthurian stories were the Game of Thrones of the early medieval period.

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PrisonerX
On 1/30/2019 at 8:55 PM, Captain Risky said:

I love Arthurian legends. I read somewhere that it’s the basis for the Knights Templar and other quasi religious orders.

Knights Templar were "quasi"? Check out the various historical accounts of the Cathars, you may think differently thereafter. 

tenor.gif

 

Edited by PrisonerX

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Captain Risky
54 minutes ago, PrisonerX said:

Knights Templar were "quasi"? Check out the various historical accounts of the Cathars, you may think differently thereafter. 

tenor.gif

 

Cathar history is pretty cool too. 

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PrisonerX
31 minutes ago, Captain Risky said:

Cathar history is pretty cool too. 

giphy.gif

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jaylemurph
On 1/30/2019 at 2:23 PM, sci-nerd said:

It's interesting that the Brits in the 7th century, where Arthur is supposed to have lived and ruled, were not Christians. It took another 100 years, before the new religion had a firm grip on the general population.
And then, 100 years after Christianity had become standard, the viking raids started.

Only 100 years separates the mindset of the Brits and the Norsemen. They could have gotten along fine, if just the timing had been better!

Nope. 

The Romans brought Christianity with them in the first/second century CE. The religion waned, esp. in the central and Eastern areas of the island, but was maintained in the Celtic-speaking areas. A sixth-century sermon by a Welsh monk of the is the first reference to Arthur. 

The area was famously re-converted by missionaries sent by St Gregory the Great later in the sixth century. (“Non angeli sunt, sed Angli,” he said, seeing British slaves for sell in the Roman Forum.)

—Jaylemurph 

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sci-nerd
13 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

Nope. 

The Romans brought Christianity with them in the first/second century CE. The religion waned, esp. in the central and Eastern areas of the island, but was maintained in the Celtic-speaking areas. A sixth-century sermon by a Welsh monk of the is the first reference to Arthur. 

The area was famously re-converted by missionaries sent by St Gregory the Great later in the sixth century. (“Non angeli sunt, sed Angli,” he said, seeing British slaves for sell in the Roman Forum.)

—Jaylemurph 

Yes, it's a bit more complicated than I made it sound. I was referring to Augustine's mission in 597 AD.

Quote

We tend to associate the arrival of Christianity in Britain with the mission of Augustine in 597 AD. But in fact Christianity arrived long before then, and in the 1st Century AD, there wasn't an organised attempt to convert the British.

It began when Roman artisans and traders arriving in Britain spread the story of Jesus along with stories of their Pagan deities.

Christianity was just one cult amongst many, but unlike the cults of Rome, Christianity demanded exclusive allegiance from its followers.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/history/uk_1.shtml

 

Edited by sci-nerd
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