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OverSword

Death and Valor on an American Warship

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OverSword

 

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It’s the dead of night, and the USS Fitzgerald is on a secret mission to the South China Sea.

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Link to an amazing website and story

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Hankenhunter

Bookmarked for later. Very riveting.

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third_eye

Hmmmmm ...

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~

Vice Admiral Joseph Aucoin was commander of the 7th Fleet at the time of the collisions. A Naval aviator who fought in the Balkans and Iraq, he made repeated pleas to his superiors for more men, more ships, more time to train. He was ignored, then fired.

...

Chapter 3. The Bridge

“The Only Way for Things to Get Better Here Is for Us to Have a Serious Accident or Someone to Die.”

~

 

Something is seriously wrong somewhere everywhere

~

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Vlad the Mighty

It's not just the Americans ... Norway warship Helge Ingstad

I can';t help suspecting that there's an attitude among some naval captains that they own the sea and that everyone else should automatically give way to them. The attitude going back to the days of sail when naval vessels expected merchant ships to dip their colours to them, or they'd get a cannonball across their bows. 

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third_eye
Just now, Vlad the Mighty said:

It's not just the Americans ... Norway warship Helge Ingstad

I can';t help suspecting that there's an attitude among some naval captains that they own the sea and that everyone else should automatically give way to them. The attitude going back to the days of sail when naval vessels expected merchant ships to dip their colours to them, or they'd get a cannonball across their bows. 

I only managed to get to the mid part of the read, ran out of memory as the maps is a monstrous memory hog. So far what I managed to peek at is that the Fitzgerald on the night was undermanned /crew failing and outdated equipment, inexperienced officers and a Captain that was out of the sync

A perfect storm that started with the Captain issuing orders to speed on busy waters and then going to bed with a 'Call me if anything goes wrong' There wasn't time

~

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Peter B
55 minutes ago, third_eye said:

I only managed to get to the mid part of the read, ran out of memory as the maps is a monstrous memory hog. So far what I managed to peek at is that the Fitzgerald on the night was undermanned /crew failing and outdated equipment, inexperienced officers and a Captain that was out of the sync

A perfect storm that started with the Captain issuing orders to speed on busy waters and then going to bed with a 'Call me if anything goes wrong' There wasn't time

~

Yep, third_eye pretty much nailed it.

But the scary thing is how much the accident, tragic as it was, appears to have been only a symptom of a bigger problem affecting the whole of the US 7th Fleet, with its causes stretching through the US Department of Defense, multiple administrations, and Congress. There's a related article on the propublica website which delves into that side of things, and it's ugly reading.

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third_eye
1 hour ago, Peter B said:

Yep, third_eye pretty much nailed it.

But the scary thing is how much the accident, tragic as it was, appears to have been only a symptom of a bigger problem affecting the whole of the US 7th Fleet, with its causes stretching through the US Department of Defense, multiple administrations, and Congress. There's a related article on the propublica website which delves into that side of things, and it's ugly reading.

I liked the part about honesty and trust being the currency of communication on a ship ... they were running the ship on a huge debt considering the almost disasters in the weeks leading up to the big one

~

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aztek
5 hours ago, Vlad the Mighty said:

It's not just the Americans ... Norway warship Helge Ingstad

I can';t help suspecting that there's an attitude among some naval captains that they own the sea and that everyone else should automatically give way to them. The attitude going back to the days of sail when naval vessels expected merchant ships to dip their colours to them, or they'd get a cannonball across their bows. 

 

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Myles
19 hours ago, OverSword said:

I know they are different, but I couldn't stop this from playing in my head.

 

 

 

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Hankenhunter

Wow, That was incredibly well done. Thanks, OverSword for this gem of history. 

Edited by Hankenhunter

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Peter B
22 hours ago, aztek said:

yes i knew it is a joke,  very observant of you, lamo,  now you know it too. 

btw did you actually had to google it? lol

Oh, get over yourself, aztek. I knew the lighthouse story was a joke decades ago.

But seeing as we were discussing a serious issue affecting the readiness of the largest fleet in the US Navy, I was giving you credit for intending to post a serious response to the thread, and wasn't sure whether you realised it was a joke.

So I included the link in case you decided to argue with me.

Edited by Peter B

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