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Asteroids are harder to shatter than we thought

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Jon the frog

Deviation with a rocket thug... still need to be done far away and it would take time and good fuel reserve.

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bison

Asteroids are likelier to resist disruption by explosions than expected. Simply increasing the size of the explosion, as the article seems to suggest, still doesn't solve the problem of the pieces. Some could be quite large, and still strike the Earth.  It seems better to detonate an explosion farther away from the asteroid, giving it a nudge away from its Earth-bound path. We're already pretty good at putting bombs on the tops of rockets. This would only need a bigger rocket, for which we already have plans.   

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DieChecker

I've been a fan of the "push" idea. As long as we catch it soon enough to make a difference. 

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AllPossible

Interesting... Nasa did a computer model collision 20 years ago right after the movie Armageddon came out.

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Rolltide

Good thing Nasa has got these boys on standby..

GettyImages-51095228.jpg

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Waspie_Dwarf
17 hours ago, bison said:

It seems better to detonate an explosion farther away from the asteroid, giving it a nudge away from its Earth-bound path.

You seem to be forgetting that space is essentially a vacuum. What exactly is going to nudge the asteroid given that there is no shock-wave?

It has been suggested that nuclear weapons could be detonated at a distance from an asteroid in order to deflect them, but even this isn't given them a "nudge" as such. The heat and radiation from the blast would vaporise some of the surface material of the asteroid. This material would work like a thruster, changing the orbit of the asteroid.

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Jon the frog
1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

You seem to be forgetting that space is essentially a vacuum. What exactly is going to nudge the asteroid given that there is no shock-wave?

It has been suggested that nuclear weapons could be detonated at a distance from an asteroid in order to deflect them, but even this isn't given them a "nudge" as such. The heat and radiation from the blast would vaporise some of the surface material of the asteroid. This material would work like a thruster, changing the orbit of the asteroid.

Like using a big laser to heat it. still need to be prepared a long time before it come near.

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