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Still Waters

Human speech sounds evolved from our diets

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Still Waters

Although languages around the world vary greatly, some share similar speech sounds. A new study suggests that labiodental sounds like "f" and "v" are included in about half of the world's languages due to a change in our diet that relies on softer foods.

This contradicts the theory that the range of human sounds has remained unchanged since Homo sapiens emerged 300,000 years ago. The study was inspired by the hypothesis of linguist Charles Hockett, a leading figure in the field to help define linguistics as a science between the 1930s and the 1960s.

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/03/14/health/diet-changed-speech-sounds-study/index.html

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/363/6432/eaav3218

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Piney

Interesting.

There is no "V" or "F" in Northern or Central Algonquian or Oglala Lakota. Borrowed words from English replace the "F" with a "P".  The "V' is replaced with "G''.  

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Piney

@third_eye  I don't remember those sounds in Quipchak either.... But I'm only "conversational", not "fluent" so I can't say for sure. 

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third_eye
Just now, Piney said:

@third_eye  I don't remember those sounds in Quipchak either.... But I'm only "conversational", not "fluent" so I can't say for sure. 

No, not that I'm aware of. Bear in mind that 'Linguists' usually study the 'authentic' aspects which usually means the really old school speak. I've encountered Westerners that speaks a form of 'Classical' Mandarin that I can only barely understand, kinda like someone speaking Shakespearean English today

~

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Piney
2 minutes ago, third_eye said:

No, not that I'm aware of. Bear in mind that 'Linguists' usually study the 'authentic' aspects which usually means the really old school speak. I've encountered Westerners that speaks a form of 'Classical' Mandarin that I can only barely understand, kinda like someone speaking Shakespearean English today

~

I call it "Arthur Waley Mandarin". 

Quipchak is loaded with Mandarin, Rouran, Jurchen and Eastern Iranian loanwords. They are all the words that concern, building, farming and animal husbandry. So I would imagine they lack the sounds for the same reason. 

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third_eye
Just now, Piney said:

I call it "Arthur Waley Mandarin". 

Quipchak is loaded with Mandarin, Rouran, Jurchen and Eastern Iranian loanwords. They are all the words that concern, building, farming and animal husbandry. So I would imagine they lack the sounds for the same reason. 

Pretty much the similar tunes that makes English what 'English' is today too, come to think of it ... Isn't Iranian a bit too early to be loaning to quipchak ? Persian maybe ?

~

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Piney
6 minutes ago, third_eye said:

Pretty much the similar tunes that makes English what 'English' is today too, come to think of it ... Isn't Iranian a bit too early to be loaning to quipchak ? Persian maybe ?

~

Sarmatian-Scythian. (Saka) It's who they learned metallurgy and horsemanship from. 

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Piney

@third_eye  They had a Western Turkish "backflow" during the Muslim expansion. Their Islamic terms are Persian. 

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third_eye
Just now, Piney said:

Sarmatian-Scythian. (Saka) It's who they learned metallurgy and horsemanship from. 

Can't say anything about horsemanship but I suspect metallurgical History references will be needing plenty of titles getting reprinted considering what modern archeology is digging up regarding what is being learned from the Mesolithic / Bronze and Iron Age

If I am not mistaken, there are no longer categorized as time spans but more as a regional characteristic when as applied as 'technological' in relation to human evolution. As a characteristic of human Civilizations it is still somewhat relevant though, one can also say also almost and barely.

Metallurgy may not be widespread back in the Mesolithic / Paleolithic but I believe it was not unknown, after all , it all had to start from somewhere, its not all that outrageous to believe that it started way back further back in time than presently believed.

~

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Piney
24 minutes ago, third_eye said:

Can't say anything about horsemanship but I suspect metallurgical History references will be needing plenty of titles getting reprinted considering what modern archeology is digging up regarding what is being learned from the Mesolithic / Bronze and Iron Age

We do know now that metallurgy had nothing to do with urbanization and was started by nomadic herders. Whether or not they spoke Uralic, Proto Indo-European or Altaic is still a heavily racial driven debate. 

 One of the things I had to deal with while studying the Yellow Path was "Turanists", or as I like to say "Turkic-Mongolian Nazis"

 

Edited by Piney

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third_eye
3 minutes ago, Piney said:

We do know now that metallurgy had nothing to do with urbanization and was started by nomadic herders. Whether or not they spoke Uralic, Proto Indo-European or Altaic is still a heavily racial driven debate. 

 One of the things I had to deal with while studying the Yellow Path was "Turanists", or as I like to say "Turkic-Mongolian Nazis"

 

I'm not that invested with Languages as reflective of Nationalism or even multiculturalism, I don't believe things work like that back in those old ancient days. One thing is for certain though, the knowledge would have been a heavily guarded secret and inherited through generations, I don't even believe that even if the knowledge were to be made widely and readily available it would have worked, it does take specific skill sets to be able to understand and grasp the process, be it taught as magic or the primitive form of science that it was.

Thor's Hammer was not for making Thunder , its for making magic over the anvil ...

There's a great set of documentary about an archeology experiment about building a Castle. Everything from scratch. All old school and as authentically accurate as possible. a real eye opener, this biggest archeological experiment in the world shows clearly that It takes more than just gold and money ...
~

Quote


Secrets of the Castle: Why Build A Castle? | Episode 1 | (Medieval Documentary) | Timeline - YouTube

THis is just part one of five ...

:lol:

~

 

 

   

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Piney
16 minutes ago, third_eye said:

Thor's Hammer was not for making Thunder , its for making magic over the anvil ...

I understand that.

Perun, Indra, all a name for the first Proto-Indo European Blacksmith-Priest.

The same occurred here during the entire Archaic. Knappers were specialists and Shamans who had ceremonies along with their stone tempering and working processes.  A Koens Crispin  or Piedmont knapping site is fascinating.

 

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third_eye
1 minute ago, Piney said:

Piedmont knapping site is fascinating.

What boggles my mind is the years they kept at it ... and here we are barely 2500 years of so called 'intelligent' living ... really does makes me wonder

~

Edited by third_eye
something sumpthang
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Piney
45 minutes ago, third_eye said:

What boggles my mind is the years they kept at it ... and here we are barely 2500 years of so called 'intelligent' living ... really does makes me wonder

Is it truly "intelligent"? Or a laziness that looks for a easier and cheaper way? 

We didn't smelt copper because we didn't know how to. We didn't smelt copper because it was poisonous to do so.

Let me quote a Miidewiin teaching.

"When making "pain bracelets" you never let it melt. Only grow soft. To let it melt brings the wrath of the Horned Serpent and his venom"

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