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Huge fireball exploded in Earth's atmosphere

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Black Red Devil

:blink: GULP

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Seti42

This probably happens a lot more than we realize. The earth is ~70% water-covered, most of humanity lives in small areas called cities, and we aren't watching everywhere.

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and then
17 hours ago, Seti42 said:

This probably happens a lot more than we realize. The earth is ~70% water-covered, most of humanity lives in small areas called cities, and we aren't watching everywhere.

I guess the reason we notice more that occur over the Russian landmass is that the Russian territory is so vast.  If a Chelyabinsk strength object detonated over Manhattan, it could kill people and cause millions in damage. Not to mention adding hundreds of thousands in extra sales of laundry detergent  :w00t:

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bison
Posted (edited)

 A worldwide chart of sizable meteorite impacts is included in the complete BBC News article.  Judging by this, the Center for Near Earth Object Studies, a part of NASA, has a pretty good network of sensors for detecting these strikes, wherever in the world they may happen, even over the oceans, and remote land areas.  

Edited by bison

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Raptor Witness

Here's a .gif of the thing, if it will post properly.  

Nice find ...

him8-meteor-44706.gif

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