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Aaron2016

9/11 State of Mind Finally Over?

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Aaron2016

Is 9/11 still with us, or has that phase and state of mind finally passed into history?  We thought the world would never feel the same again after 9/11 and there was a weird feeling that everything that happened before and after 9/11 was like two different eras and states of mind.  Whenever I watch a film, TV show, or hear a song from the 1990's I immediately think - "that was before 9/11 and how innocent those times were".  However I no longer feel that emotional divide anymore.  Is this a sign that things are changing?  Are times much better today or has the passage of time simply blurred out the negative impact that 9/11 had on all of us?

 

 

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Gromdor

It's almost been two decades.  Enough time for children that weren't even born yet to almost reach adulthood.  I think that phase and mindset has faded.

Heck, we are actively trying to do a peace treaty with the Taliban and are happily selling Saudi Arabia nuclear technology.

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sci-nerd

9/11 might be over, but look what we got instead: Political correctness!

9/11 may have smothered our rights, but PC is smothering our daily lives and our minds.

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Big Jim

I have to agree with Gromdor, a fair percentage of the population was either born after it or was too young to remember it.  Either way, it's not part of their history.  But those of us who lived through it will always bear some scars from it.  The shock and pain has subsided, as it does with any tragedy, but the trust and sense of security is gone forever.  Once something like that happens then you will always have in the back of your mind that it is possible.  Before, it was unthinkable.

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Big Jim
1 hour ago, Aaron2016 said:

Whenever I watch a film, TV show, or hear a song from the 1990's I immediately think - "that was before 9/11 and how innocent those times were".

It hits home sometimes when I see a film with the Twin Towers as part of the New York skyline.  

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susieice

I can remember that day clearly. Everything about it. I don't think I'll ever be able to forget it. It was our generation's Pearl Harbor. I can also remember the assassination of JFK clearly and I was just a young child then. I remember watching the news breaks when Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy were assassinated.

I do hope the younger generation has been given some teaching on that day but I doubt it will be to them what it was for us.

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Big Jim
1 hour ago, susieice said:

I can remember that day clearly. Everything about it. I don't think I'll ever be able to forget it. It was our generation's Pearl Harbor. I can also remember the assassination of JFK clearly and I was just a young child then. I remember watching the news breaks when Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy were assassinated.

I do hope the younger generation has been given some teaching on that day but I doubt it will be to them what it was for us.

We must be close to the same age.   9/11 was especially strange for me.  I was working in a room with 4 or 5 others, all doing mindless clerical work.   I had just written down the date for the first time that day and said to the room "this is an emergency day -911."  Five minutes later someone came running in with the news.

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susieice
Posted (edited)

I was working the 3-11 shift and had that Tuesday off. I was still sleeping when the first plane hit and my brother woke me up to tell me. Only left the TV when I went to the grocery store. Just so shaken, but I remember everything clearly from the second tower to the pentagon to the collapses and when I started hearing the names of the corporations that were beginning to list how many people they had missing. We had it on at work and I think the TV in my room was on all night for at least two weeks as more information came in. I remember the service at the National Cathedral too. All the living Presidents and First Ladies were there except Ronald Reagan. He was really sick by then but Nancy was there. I'll never forget that day.

Edited by susieice
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Impedancer

I was in Stockholm and shopping grocery, while i heard it on the radio. first i thought it was some kind of bad joke until we arrived to our apartment and turned on the TV. Just seeing the plane fly into the one  towers was shocking.

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Susanc241

I had just turned on the TV here in the U.K. to watch while I did the ironing (on my day off from work).  Couldn’t believe what I was seeing.  I picked up the broadcast just minutes after they started it and watched right through the day (and beyond).

I am old enough to remember the moon landings, JFK's assassination, etc.  My first TV memory of note is the coronation of our current monarch.  We do tend to mark our lives with these memorable events, whether they be good or bad.  Unfortunately the current run (over the last decade or so) of terrorist atrocities I feel will end up being a period in history rather than remembered necessarily as individual events, especially to those not personally involved.

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Kismit

It hasn’t left any of us who are old enough to have lived through it, The world changed for me,

i know since that moment I have never truly believed that life is as simple as we like to think it is. And, it really can change in a heartbeat.

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Raptor Witness
Posted (edited)

 A few months ago, I went through a real binge of many of the audio recordings of the people that were trapped in those buildings. I became fascinated with the stories of those who escaped, versus those who perished.  I wasn’t at all interested in the hijackers or their motive’s, or anything to do with them, whatsoever. So if the motive was to spread an ideology, it certainly failed with me.

I became far more focused on the humanitarian aspects of the whole mess. The dead and dying cried out for revenge, but the living did not, they were just simply grateful to be alive. 

I’m left with the clear concern that it really is imperialism, which the United States has engaged in, and as far as fairness, I’m not sure that I can take a side when it comes to fairness. I can always take a side when it comes to nationalism, but if nationalism leads to more 9/11’s, then sorry, I think I can do without imperialism.

 

Edited by Raptor Witness

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Myles

I was working at a plant in their parts storeroom.   A delivery guy, Nick from Kendall Electric, asked me if I had heard.    Watched for a while on the breakroom TV.   

Although I was only 10 at the time, I remember clearly the day John Lennon was killed.   

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aztek

i was there as it happened, i watched plains hit, and towers collapse, my buildings were 2 blocks away, i was involved in clean out right after.  the only thing that i feel "before and after" is how access to the city changed. security check points,  all  that made getting truck deliveries much more complicated, other than that city has not changed. much, 

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Ashotep

The aftereffects of 9/11 may always be with us, TSA, expanded surveillance.  So even if you weren't alive at that time you still feel the effects of it.

I will never forget what I was doing on that day.  When I heard about it on the radio I thought it was a joke at first, then reality and the horror of it set in.

 

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Big Jim

I remember the pervasive sense of fear afterwards.  No one was sure what was coming next.  We were all wondering if this was just the first wave of a major war.  I went out the next day and planted grass seed in my yard, a chore I was already planning to do, and I was aware of wondering if I would be around next spring to see it grow.

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F3SS

I was in tech school at the time. I stayed home that day. More likely slept in.

My mom woke me up, said a plane just hit the twin towers and to come check it out. I remember trying to figure out exactly what the twin towers were and if it was Chicago or New York. What can I say!

I watched the second plane hit live as I exclaimed to my mom that we were under attack and everything that followed all day. The collapse, the people covered in dust, the speculation, the misinformation, the assumed death toll upwards of 20k people and the concern that there were still a dozen planes not grounded heading for cities across the country. I remember LA being a huge concern.

Later that morning I grabbed a small American flag and tied it to my car's antenna and soon realized literally almost everybody had thought to do the same. It remained until it was tattered threads.

I remember all the thoughts and confusion I had along with an instant realization that the world just changed. It was so silent that day. The erriness of it and the lack of planes in the sky that we normally tune out was impossible not to notice.

I had work that day. I worked for a telemarketing company and I sucked at it and that was no day to cold call people. They never called me off. Even though I had a hunch I decided to go in about 5 o'clock. There was zero traffic and that was the heart of rush hour. I arrived and the building was closed. These two other people my age were there too in the same situation and asked me for a ride downtown which was about 5 miles away. I didn't know them and didn't know how they got there in the first place but I couldn't resist a reason to see the city (Pittsburgh) on that day. Again, rush hour, no traffic, zipped into and out of the city in record time. The entire city was vacant except for a few stragglers walking around here and there. That was nuts.

I remember watching the news and seeing ground zero smoldering for weeks and the radio banning of lynrd skynrd's Tuesdays Gone. So yeah, I still see two different times in history and I still think about it quite a bit though it's not nearly as consuming as it once was. 

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F3SS
Posted (edited)

Oh, and the telemarketing job opened 3 days later and let me tell you how awkward it was and how mad people were when they answered the phone to my not so eloquent verbatim script about the weather and their magazine subscriptions and it lasted. My last day was 2 weeks later and my last call was to an old lady in Seattle. I lent her my ear for 45 minutes, and my bosses never caught on, while she vented about 911 and the state of current affairs. She was really nice, just wanted to go off a bit and in the end apologized for keeping me so long and that she wouldn't be renewing her magazine subscriptions lol. My shift was over and I told them I quit. I couldn't sell for anything and they we're going to fire me for it soon anyhow but I always remembered that as the end of my immediate thoughts of 911 as fresh news.

Edited by F3SS
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susieice
6 hours ago, Big Jim said:

I remember the pervasive sense of fear afterwards.  No one was sure what was coming next.  We were all wondering if this was just the first wave of a major war.  I went out the next day and planted grass seed in my yard, a chore I was already planning to do, and I was aware of wondering if I would be around next spring to see it grow.

I live a little over an hour from NYC and our first responders headed out right away to see if they could help. I don't remember feeling fear, only numb. I wasn't functioning clearly. I do remember hearing the first plane flying over heading to the airport near me a couple of days later. It's strange, because I swear, I took a bus trip with some people from the area to the memorial and the museum. A plane flew over nearby and guess what we all did. We all looked up. Going through the museum was almost as emotional as the month after the attack. I've heard most Americans showed symptoms of shock during that time.  

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Big Jim
9 hours ago, F3SS said:

Later that morning I grabbed a small American flag and tied it to my car's antenna and soon realized literally almost everybody had thought to do the same. It remained until it was tattered threads.

I had a flag that I put out on holidays and I did the same thing, I put it on my front porch and left it up for weeks.  It was partly out of pride and partly out of defiance.  Strange how that same idea spring up everywhere.

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Podo

I didn't think about it when it happened, and I rarely thought about it after it happened. The only thing I remember actively changing in my life afterwards is that suddenly I needed a passport to go to the States, which we didn't always need before 11/9/2001. Granted, I was 11 when it happened, so it wasn't something I really heard about until a ways afterward.

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Aaron2016
Posted (edited)

It happened around 2pm here in the UK.  I came home early from college and was playing the new PS2 demo of Metal Gear Solid 2.  I normally would turn on the TV and first watch the top of the hour news coverage.  I should be thankful that I didn't that day because the 2nd plane hit live on TV during the headlines around 2.03pm GMT.  When I turned off the game around 2.15 I saw a replay of the fire ball and explosion on the BBC.  I told my mother that a big skyscraper in China was on fire.  She was ironing in the living room.  I began to flick through the channels and I soon realized it was New York city, and then came word that Washington was being attacked as well.  It was hard to believe what was happening and understand the human death toll because the buildings were so enormous and the news cameras were so far away from the scene that it was hard to imagine thousands of people were in the buildings.  Although I remember at one point we saw a live close up which showed people hanging out of the windows and one person was waving a white towel, and sadly soon after this the towers fell.  It is strange to say, but I never felt any emotion that day.  I was just too stunned to react in any way to what I had just witnessed.  It was so hard to accept that I remained in emotional denial for some time and it wasn't until the first anniversary in 2002 that I finally felt the emotional impact and I gained a terrific sense of patriotism towards America and bought a huge American flag.

 

 

Edited by Aaron2016
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Likely Guy
On 3/18/2019 at 4:24 PM, Aaron2016 said:

Is 9/11 still with us, or has that phase and state of mind finally passed into history?  We thought the world would never feel the same again after 9/11 and there was a weird feeling that everything that happened before and after 9/11 was like two different eras and states of mind.  Whenever I watch a film, TV show, or hear a song from the 1990's I immediately think - "that was before 9/11 and how innocent those times were".  However I no longer feel that emotional divide anymore.  Is this a sign that things are changing?  Are times much better today or has the passage of time simply blurred out the negative impact that 9/11 had on all of us?

 

 

9/11 is still very much with us and essentially changed the world. It's just that now, having lived in that world for the last 17+ years we don't recognize the differences. While there were terrorist attacks prior to and after the event, it was 9/11 that brought it 'home' for the average person. Since then, the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan and the subsequent rise of ISIS wouldn't have happened , nor the retributive attack on the mosque in NZ last week.

Yes, 9/11 is still very much with us. We just don't know how life might have been different had it not happened.

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EnderOTD
Posted (edited)

Peace out man

Edited by EnderOTD

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