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World's largest Tyrannosaurus rex unveiled

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AllPossible
Posted (edited)

Wow.. Cool discovery, I read an article years ago that said the reason land animals maybe even sea creatures were much larger was because of the Nitrogen content in the atmosphere. It contained so much Nitrogen that it caused rapid growth, I assume even trees were very tall and thick. Probably build an entire apartment building in 1 tree alone lol. Earth is a complex beautiful place to have amazing creatures millions of years ago before we were even a thought.

Edited by AllPossible

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Carnoferox
1 hour ago, AllPossible said:

Wow.. Cool discovery, I read an article years ago that said the reason land animals maybe even sea creatures were much larger was because of the Nitrogen content in the atmosphere. It contained so much Nitrogen that it caused rapid growth, I assume even trees were very tall and thick. Probably build an entire apartment building in 1 tree alone lol. Earth is a complex beautiful place to have amazing creatures millions of years ago before we were even a thought.

Animals growing to large sizes in the past had nothing to do with atmospheric nitrogen, sorry to say.

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AllPossible
2 hours ago, Carnoferox said:

Animals growing to large sizes in the past had nothing to do with atmospheric nitrogen, sorry to say.

Don't be sorry but at least back it up with some knowledge. Kind of stupid that you got a trophy for just denying something without a reason.

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Carnoferox
1 minute ago, AllPossible said:

Don't be sorry but at least back it up with some knowledge. Kind of stupid that you got a trophy for just denying something without a reason.

Nitrogen already makes up a majority of the atmosphere's composition, so for there to be much higher levels of nitrogen there would have to be much less oxygen. Anoxic conditions are deadly for life, not beneficial, and certainly wouldn't result in organisms attaining larger sizes. I'd like to see what articles you've been reading.

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Alien Origins

Damn! Thats a huge T Rex! 

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Not A Rockstar
48 minutes ago, Alien Origins said:

Damn! Thats a huge T Rex! 

LOL exactly what I said! 13 meters and you know it is probable there were larger we haven't found or never will. 

I can't even really imagine standing on the ground and looking at one in real life. Like having a 2 story building coming at you ...

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Alien Origins
32 minutes ago, Not A Rockstar said:

LOL exactly what I said! 13 meters and you know it is probable there were larger we haven't found or never will. 

I can't even really imagine standing on the ground and looking at one in real life. Like having a 2 story building coming at you ...

They had a mock up of one here at one of the local now defunct malls....This thing was huge even for a mock up.

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Not A Rockstar

@Carnoferox do we have any idea how long a T Rex may have lived? Were they sort of like elephants or crocs maybe in age and maturing? 

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Carnoferox
1 hour ago, Not A Rockstar said:

@Carnoferox do we have any idea how long a T Rex may have lived? Were they sort of like elephants or crocs maybe in age and maturing? 

There have been a few studies of Tyrannosaurus growth/lifespan. Erickson et al. (2004) found Sue to be the oldest specimen at 28 years old, and the slightly larger Scotty would have been of a similar age.

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Myles

Took them 18 years to announce this.    They found it in 1991.

 

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Carnoferox
1 hour ago, Myles said:

Took them 18 years to announce this.    They found it in 1991.

Well, 18 years to publish it in the scientific literature. Sadly paleontology can take a lot of time to get published results.

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