Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
UM-Bot

Mystery surrounds hunt for methane on Mars

Recommended Posts

 
RoofGardener

Perhaps somebody opened a window ? :unsure2:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bison

We know of microorganisms on Earth, which consume methane as food. Perhaps there's a whole ecology on Mars. Some organisms produce methane, and others consume it. We may have detected methane at one time, because its production got a bit ahead of consumption, for a while. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tmcom
7 hours ago, RoofGardener said:

Perhaps somebody opened a window ? :unsure2:

Probably explains all of those green things the rover keeps passing?
^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cyclopes500

I'm wondering if its oil and natural gas causing it. In the beginning 2-3 billion years ago Earth had a methane atmosphere. Life started in it. I'm wondering if the same happened on Mars. The primitive bacteria lived and died in the seas of Mars. When they died they took the material they were made up of to the Marsian sea bed. Over the eons it mounted up, but unlike Earth, the planet Mars died because the volcanism stopped and the magnetic field protecting the planet and its atmosphere went with it. Probably after life that could photosynthise CO2 appeared. The oxygen released turned the iron content of the rock rust red as happened on Earth. Meanwhile the material left over from the bacteria now trapped in the rock changed and became what we call oil and natural gas. OK there isn't the amount there like you'd find on Earth but if small geological movements occurred the gas could be coming from a tiny natural gas well or two. It goes into the atmosphere and gets detected. I also say this. Mars is closer to the asteroid belt and it's 1/10th Earth Mass with a much lower gravity. It gets hit more because its closer to that belt. I picture an asteroid hitting Mars a now dying freezing planet at the right angle, blasting rock off the surface of Mars, the rock travels quickly to Earth with the life forms trapped inside. It survives atmospheric entry leaving a trail of smoke behind it and then BAM it explodes releasing the colder inner contents of the meteor. The bits land in the primative seas of Earth and the Marsians find a new home, evolve, and eventually became us. So in a way. When we go to Mars a part of us could be really going back home to see our ancestors. Marsian bacteria. If Venus had turned out different the same could have happened there too. Pity really. Perhaps they're the radically genetically different plants or Fungi and we're the Earthlings who now take part in a natural symbiotic relationship with them.




Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.