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Still Waters

'Giant lion' fossil found in museum drawer

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Still Waters

A new species of giant mammal has been identified after researchers investigated bones that had been kept for decades in a Kenyan museum drawer.

The species, dubbed "Simbakubwa kutokaafrika" meaning "big African lion" in Swahili, roamed east Africa about 20 millions years ago.

But the huge creature was part of a now extinct group of mammals called hyaenodonts.

The discovery could help explain what happened to the group.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-47976205

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Myles

I'm sure the SyFy channel is already in production of the movie.

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Jon the frog

That's a huge predator, imagine the size of the territory needed for one of these beast !

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Myles
26 minutes ago, Jon the frog said:

That's a huge predator, imagine the size of the territory needed for one of these beast !

We can clone them and mammoths and release them in northern Canada.     

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oldrover
18 minutes ago, Myles said:

We can clone them and mammoths and release them in northern Canada.     

A bit like Jurrasic Park, but with interesting animals instead of dinosaurs. 

I don't mean it Carneferox. 

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Dark_Grey
28 minutes ago, Myles said:

We can clone them and mammoths and release them in northern Canada.     

Let's not get too carried away here...

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Myles
22 minutes ago, Dark_Grey said:

Let's not get too carried away here...

But seriously, I thought if we cloned mammoths and were to release them in the wild, the northern tundra of Canada might be an ideal location.   

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Dark_Grey
12 minutes ago, Myles said:

But seriously, I thought if we cloned mammoths and were to release them in the wild, the northern tundra of Canada might be an ideal location.   

That or Siberia. I believe Siberia more closely matches their original habitat. There is even talk of cloning mammoths in Siberia to reduce climate change....something to do with the way mammoths interact with grasses or something...

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freetoroam
1 hour ago, Myles said:

We can clone them and mammoths and release them in northern Canada.     

What about all those bigfoot hunters out there? they could be eaten by these roaming beast, but more importantly,  bigfoot could get eaten. :o

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Myles
1 hour ago, Dark_Grey said:

That or Siberia. I believe Siberia more closely matches their original habitat. There is even talk of cloning mammoths in Siberia to reduce climate change....something to do with the way mammoths interact with grasses or something...

I thought about Siberia too.    A big issue, if we ever got to that point, will be the poaching for the ivory.  

Heck, looks like you can currently buy it.

https://www.boonetrading.com/collections/mammoth-ivory-bone

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freetoroam
1 hour ago, Myles said:

I thought about Siberia too.    A big issue, if we ever got to that point, will be the poaching for the ivory.  

Heck, looks like you can currently buy it.

https://www.boonetrading.com/collections/mammoth-ivory-bone

We know these traders did not poach them, but yes, reckon they would if these animals were around, then they would not sell things in halves

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Earl.Of.Trumps
Posted (edited)

Some vindication here, although I doubt others will recall.

^ months or so ago, a scientific article was released saying that 86% of all species on earth still not found  Link  - to wit "

Even after centuries of effort, some 86 percent of Earth's species have yet to be fully described, according to new study that predicts our planet is home to 8.7 million species.

 
 
 
 
 
 

That means scientists have cataloged less than 15 percent of species now alive—and current extinction rates mean many unknown organisms will wink out of existence before they can be recorded.---------------------

 

 
So I used this info to demonstrate that BigFoot could be one such species of millions that simply are unfound. Immediately I was hit with "THAT'S NOT THE LARGE SPECIES OF ANIMALS". 

Vindication is SWEET  :)

Edited by Earl.Of.Trumps
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Carnoferox
8 hours ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

Some vindication here, although I doubt others will recall.

^ months or so ago, a scientific article was released saying that 86% of all species on earth still not found  Link  - to wit "

Even after centuries of effort, some 86 percent of Earth's species have yet to be fully described, according to new study that predicts our planet is home to 8.7 million species.

 
 
 
 
 
 

That means scientists have cataloged less than 15 percent of species now alive—and current extinction rates mean many unknown organisms will wink out of existence before they can be recorded.---------------------

 

 
So I used this info to demonstrate that BigFoot could be one such species of millions that simply are unfound. Immediately I was hit with "THAT'S NOT THE LARGE SPECIES OF ANIMALS". 

Vindication is SWEET  :)

What does this discovery have anything to do with undiscovered living species?

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Myles
39 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

What does this discovery have anything to do with undiscovered living species?

I was thinking the same thing.   Using the finding of a large species from 20 million years ago as support for bigfoot existing is kind of silly.   In fact, it is quite the opposite.   We can find proof of an animal from 20 million years ago, but not of a large species that supposedly lives in many places on the planet.

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Carnoferox
7 minutes ago, Myles said:

I was thinking the same thing.   Using the finding of a large species from 20 million years ago as support for bigfoot existing is kind of silly.   In fact, it is quite the opposite.   We can find proof of an animal from 20 million years ago, but not of a large species that supposedly lives in many places on the planet.

Irrelevant comparisons are typical crypto rhetoric so I can't say I'm surprised.

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freetoroam
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Myles said:

I was thinking the same thing.   Using the finding of a large species from 20 million years ago as support for bigfoot existing is kind of silly.   In fact, it is quite the opposite.   We can find proof of an animal from 20 million years ago, but not of a large species that supposedly lives in many places on the planet.

Thought the same thing.

Finding animsl fossils from 20 million years ago is not the easiest thing to do, but they do find them. And yet some (alleged)  bigfoot waltzing about in numerous states seems to be impossible to find. 

What more proof do the bigfooterions need that there is no bigfoot?

 

Yes, i just invented the word  bigfooterions. 

Edited by freetoroam
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