Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
trevor borocz johnson

why electrons have weight but not light

5 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

trevor borocz johnson

If light is a wave passing by, it wouldn't have weight accept briefly as it passes by, for example a single water wave passing by would add weight briefly to the surface of the water then it would return to normal. If you trapped that wave in one place it would continuously add weight to the surface at that point. Same is true for an electron trapped in place by an atom giving it the effect of 'weight'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Rlyeh

How's your cat?

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson
1 minute ago, Rlyeh said:

How's your cat?

I'll ask her

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Inn Spectre
1 hour ago, trevor borocz johnson said:

If light is a wave passing by, it wouldn't have weight accept briefly as it passes by, for example a single water wave passing by would add weight briefly to the surface of the water then it would return to normal. If you trapped that wave in one place it would continuously add weight to the surface at that point. Same is true for an electron trapped in place by an atom giving it the effect of 'weight'.

The word you should be using is 'mass' not 'weight'.  A wave traveling on the surface of water only causes distortions; it does not affect the mass of the water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson
Posted (edited)
On 4/18/2019 at 1:45 PM, Inn Spectre said:

The word you should be using is 'mass' not 'weight'.  A wave traveling on the surface of water only causes distortions; it does not affect the mass of the water.

The weight of a wave on water pushes down on the surface, and like when you jump on an air mattress and everything on it flies up, The wave pushes up the water in the direction its moving. That's why the water and things don't move with the wave they just bob up and down. The wave starts out from density changes in the water from currents.

Edited by trevor borocz johnson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.