Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
trevor borocz johnson

creating AC current with a fan

47 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

trevor borocz johnson

 

 

In an AC current the motion of the electrons is back and forth between the copper atoms in the wire as opposed to a direct current where the electrons pass along in one direction between the cathode and the anode. It would make since that the back and forth motion of the electrons between atoms in an AC current is cause by the circulating magnet in the generator. While North faces one direction it pushes out like a fans wind on the copper atoms, when it rotates 180 degrees and south is facing that direction the pull or draw on the electrons in the copper wiring brings the electrons back. This active electricty continues to do this. 

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
and then

The oscillation of the current creates a "pulsing" effect that pushes the rotor of the motor.  In other kinds of circuits where DC is needed, they simply insert rectification.  I'm not sure what your point is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
XenoFish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson
Just now, and then said:

The oscillation of the current creates a "pulsing" effect that pushes the rotor of the motor.  In other kinds of circuits where DC is needed, they simply insert rectification.  I'm not sure what your point is?

oscillation is a sine wave and making shapes in the wave. It's how guitar pedals are built. I'm not sure how it incorporates to a generator creating AC current.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
and then
Just now, trevor borocz johnson said:

oscillation is a sine wave and making shapes in the wave. It's how guitar pedals are built. I'm not sure how it incorporates to a generator creating AC current.

The pulse is created by the motion of the rotor against the stator coil of the generator.  That current from the "pulse" is sent down the line then creates motion in the fan's rotor assembly.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson
Posted (edited)

Anyways my point is if you spun a fan around inside a loop of plastic balls you would push on and pull on the plastic balls similar as a magnet does to the electrons in an an AC current. You could probably fuel and build a computer this way as well, a mechanical one anyways. Gate in a computer

 

Edited by trevor borocz johnson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson
On 4/24/2019 at 12:51 PM, and then said:

The oscillation of the current creates a "pulsing" effect that pushes the rotor of the motor.  In other kinds of circuits where DC is needed, they simply insert rectification.  I'm not sure what your point is?

what I'm saying is a magnet is like a fan, for example if you placed two fans facing each other they would push apart, much the way two north or south ends of a magnet would. And if you attached two fans together facing the same direction they would stick together, just like the north and south ends of a magnet would.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BorizBadinov

While it's good to explore new ideas one also has to consider how useful a device of that nature would be. As a computer made up of millions of fans and balls how big do you imagine it would be? 

Each fan must start from null or reverse thrust to push or pull the gate. 

Instead of switching incredibly fast as alternating current does it would take far longer to open and close a gate. Plus you have friction to account for and gravity. 

Also you are creating a magnet effect (kind of) with fans which use multiple magnets to achieve the effect and use many times the wattage. So you are really doing double work and you could create the same gate easier with just electromagnets without fans or balls.

I don't see any economy in that way. One gate would be the size of a pc. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson
6 hours ago, BorizBadinov said:

While it's good to explore new ideas one also has to consider how useful a device of that nature would be. As a computer made up of millions of fans and balls how big do you imagine it would be? 

Each fan must start from null or reverse thrust to push or pull the gate. 

Instead of switching incredibly fast as alternating current does it would take far longer to open and close a gate. Plus you have friction to account for and gravity. 

Also you are creating a magnet effect (kind of) with fans which use multiple magnets to achieve the effect and use many times the wattage. So you are really doing double work and you could create the same gate easier with just electromagnets without fans or balls.

I don't see any economy in that way. One gate would be the size of a pc. 

What if the balls were really tiny and could operate an amplifier that looks like a horn using a tuning fork in the process, it's all about conversion of electrical components into mechanical ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson

Here's a mechanical rectifier for our fan driven plastic ball AC. The plate between the balls moves back and forth spinning the two wheels on right and left, but at opposing times, and opposite directions. The rectifier belt changes the direction of the wheel so that both wheels are spinning in the same direction and giving a continuous output. Can anyone explain how an electronic rectifier works similar to this mechanical one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson

Welp it took me till 4:30 am but I came up with an amplifier for my plastic ball fan AC current. The weak current caused by the small balls at (A) causes the effort on the lever at (B) to travel up and down the lever depending on how much power is applied through the gear system at (A). If the effort moves up the lever the weight at (C) begins to fall. The powerful weight releases pressure from the power source at (D). The turbine in the pipe at (E) spins the gears at (F) which creates an amplified signal current for the bigger balls. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rlyeh

What would be a benefit of this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson
Posted (edited)

Here's a mechanical TV I came up with. The photovoltaic cell in the tube sends out a current based on how bright it is in the tube and on any part of the screen in this case the corner. The current it sends out powers the fan sending current to B. The torque in the gears balances with the energy in the spring at C and the effort rod moves up and down the lever in accordance with the current from the cell. This causes the weight to drop at D and like a faucet the water is released spinning the turbine at F. The spinning then powers a paper roll that reflects the brightness of the TV screen in the tube. The paper roll starts off dark then as it raveled by the power from F it gets brighter. The spring at G keeps balances with the torque from F and when calibrated correctly will reflect the brightness in the tube. The one square of color then adds to many squares to make an image on the screen at H.

Edited by trevor borocz johnson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson

here is a picture of the world's smalles motor, important if I want to convert weak electronic signals into mecanical one's to be amplified mechanically.

maxresdefault.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson

world's tiniest spring as well

bantam2010_medium.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson

Here would be a more final version of the mechanical amplifier. The input signal from the microphone at (A) causes the very small motor at B to spin.. The spin of the motor pulls up on the lever and is balanced by the energy of the spring pushing back. The weight at D falls and pulls up one E allowing water to flow past (G). The spring power supply at F balances with the amount of pressure in the hose from F to E. When that pressure falls The turbine at F adds more from the spring power supply. The spinning at G then operates a generator at H which operates the speaker at I.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
moonman
Posted (edited)

This makes no sense. You can't just plug a microphone into a motor and expect it to power it to do useful work. If it even works at all, the microscopic amount of spin you get from that motor wouldn't scale up to do close to what you propose - and that's just step one. Nothing in that drawing has any basis in the reality of physics.

What's the point of any of it?

Edited by moonman
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson
Posted (edited)

https://sciencing.com/materials-carry-sound-waves-8342053.html

 

this article explains that elasticity and density of a substance carry sound waves the best. 

 

picture of a mechanical microphone. vibrations in the elastic are converted into mechanical current through the gears at the top. The long thin alluminum needle sways back and forth at the top like a tree in the wind. The longer side to side motion at the top spins the gears. the gears could then be used to operate the amplifier pictured in the previous post.

Edited by trevor borocz johnson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
moonman
Posted (edited)
32 minutes ago, trevor borocz johnson said:

It's a motor. So what? It doesn't magically run on the power of voice any more than any other motor.

Edited by moonman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson
On 5/1/2019 at 2:35 PM, moonman said:

It's a motor. So what? It doesn't magically run on the power of voice any more than any other motor.

Alright here's my answer. Convert the vibrations into two dimensional waves like in a record player. Instead of using a needle which vibrates, a small wheel goes up and down on the waves. It's up and down motion operates the lever sending a varying current through the amplifier system. the varying current is converted back to vibrations by the cap at (G) which opens and closes slightly depending on the pressure put on from the wheel at (B). The vibrations in the cap at (G) are then sent along as an amplified signal to the speaker.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson

Related image

 

picture of the waves are tiny wheel would go up and down, I suppose at the speed this record was recorded it would be a pretty bumpy ride, but if you spun the record faster as you were recording it those bumps would become longer in wavelength and more traversible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RabidMongoose
On ‎24‎/‎04‎/‎2019 at 5:47 PM, trevor borocz johnson said:

 

 

In an AC current the motion of the electrons is back and forth between the copper atoms in the wire as opposed to a direct current where the electrons pass along in one direction between the cathode and the anode. It would make since that the back and forth motion of the electrons between atoms in an AC current is cause by the circulating magnet in the generator. While North faces one direction it pushes out like a fans wind on the copper atoms, when it rotates 180 degrees and south is facing that direction the pull or draw on the electrons in the copper wiring brings the electrons back. This active electricty continues to do this. 

AC is a Sin wave meaning the direction the electricity wants to flow in rotates by 360 degrees every hertz.

A wind turbine (or fan in your case) can generate either AC or DC depending on the generator.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevor borocz johnson
1 minute ago, RabidMongoose said:

AC is a Sin wave meaning the direction the electricity wants to flow in rotates by 360 degrees every hertz.

A wind turbine (or fan in your case) can generate either AC or DC depending on the generator.

I'm comparing a magnet to a fan not curious about wind turbines.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.