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Still Waters

Sensor can detect spoiled milk before opening

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Still Waters

Expiration dates on milk could eventually become a thing of the past with new sensor technology from Washington State University scientists.

Researchers from the Department of Biological Systems Engineering (BSE), the WSU/UI School of Food Science and other departments have developed a sensor that can 'smell' if milk is still good or has gone bad.

The sensor consists of chemically coated nanoparticles that react to the gas produced by milk and the bacterial growth that indicates spoilage, according to Shyam Sablani, professor in BSE. The sensor doesn't touch the milk directly.

https://phys.org/news/2019-05-sensor.html

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danydandan
16 hours ago, Still Waters said:

Expiration dates on milk could eventually become a thing of the past with new sensor technology from Washington State University scientists.

Researchers from the Department of Biological Systems Engineering (BSE), the WSU/UI School of Food Science and other departments have developed a sensor that can 'smell' if milk is still good or has gone bad.

The sensor consists of chemically coated nanoparticles that react to the gas produced by milk and the bacterial growth that indicates spoilage, according to Shyam Sablani, professor in BSE. The sensor doesn't touch the milk directly.

https://phys.org/news/2019-05-sensor.html

On a similar news article, they have developed milk that won't soil for up to sixty days.

https://m.independent.ie/business/farming/dairy/gamechanging-technology-keeps-milk-fresh-for-60-days-38071945.html

 

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Pettytalk

A good sensitive nose, when calibrated correctly will easily tell bad milk. However, if in doubt, by taking a small sample and heating in a microwave, can easily distinguish the good from the bad. If the sample curdles than it's bad. However I can still make use of a bad thing. I take that bad milk ,and by mixing in a proper ratio with fresh milk in a large pot, add a little salt, bring the whole to around 190 degrees Fahrenheit, then add an appropriate amount of citric acid, and we have fresh ricotta cheese at the top, and milk whey below it.  

We are becoming too dependent on machines.

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