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Still Waters

Dogs that pose highest risk of biting children

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Still Waters

New research at The Ohio State University College of Medicine and The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center identifies dog breeds and physical traits that pose the highest risk of biting with severe injury. Doctors want parents of young children to use this information when deciding which dog to own.

The study, published in the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, explores the risks of dog bite injuries to the face in children and bite severity by breed, size and head structure. Researchers found pit bulls and mixed breed dogs have the highest risk of biting and cause the most damage per bite. The same goes for dogs with wide and short heads weighing between 66 and 100 pounds.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190522141825.htm

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Sir Smoke aLot

I believe that it's the owners, not dogs who are to be blamed. So many pit bulls i had pleasure to see were among most well behaved and sensitive dogs but when the owner mistreats them and is not positioned as authority.

Any dog kind can be lethal weapon. Imagine if lamb likes to bite people :D or if it can be made aggressive well i would not like to approach it lol Or cow.

 

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Not A Rockstar

This won't help if you do not also teach the kids to respect an animal's space, keep your hands out of his food and chewies and when he's asleep call him or let him alone to take his nap. Relationships work two ways. If it is not your own family dog, stay away from it unless invited and then follow the rules twice as much. Many of the dogs put down for biting don't deserve it, and many cases are with ridiculous breeds that should never have been left alone with a child. Owners are at fault in many of the cases, IMO. 

One of the best dogs with the longest fuses I have is our great pyrenes coyote killer. Safe for people but if you are wild anything, forget about it. Second best was my Catahoula cur/pit bull mix. I will still miss her when I pass over. 

I have strong opinions about this, admittedly, but, we have rescued and rehomed or kept dozens of dogs over my daughter's life, from all backgrounds and breeds and trauma in some cases in our home or on the property here. I own not one kennel or cage. No one, lastly her, has ever been bitten. Only two of those dogs did I put down because it was not trustworthy. Both were, ironically, german shepherds, though one was a wolf hybrid. 

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Orphalesion

Personally I do think breed can be a factor in a dog's aggression....in cases where the owner doesn't know how to (or is unwilling to) properly care and train that specific breed. However then it's not really the fault of dog but that of the owner getting a dog they think is pretty or trendy and getting more than they can handle or, more likely, willing to care care of. Can't expected a Caucasian Shepherd to have the same needs and lifestyle as a Pug...

And yeah, I agree fully with Not A Rockstar that teaching children the proper behaviour with animals and that you don't touch a strange dog unless the owner said that it's alright.
 

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quiXilver

Dogs that pose the highest risk of biting are those who feel insecure, those who have no human in their pack whom they view as a competent alpha and therefor are always on guard, trying to fulfill a role they inherently understand they should not.

 

Second is in humans, particularly children who never endeavor to learn an animal's language and miss cues and signals to avoid putting the animal in positions where they feel they must defend themselves.

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acute

People who say that "the owners are at fault" are unaware of the history.

Dogs have been selectively bred to accentuate their traits for 15,000 years. Look at the Pit-Bull incidents vs. Labrador incidents, and you will see that certain dog breeds are dangerous and others are docile.

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Orphalesion
58 minutes ago, acute said:

People who say that "the owners are at fault" are unaware of the history.

Dogs have been selectively bred to accentuate their traits for 15,000 years. Look at the Pit-Bull incidents vs. Labrador incidents, and you will see that certain dog breeds are dangerous and others are docile.

Yes different breeds were created for different purposes and many of them have a general, breed-specific temperament and as such they can have tendencies towards certain behaviors or traits, as well as different levels of energy and strength, that's true. But it's not as simple as to say Breed X is dangerous, Breed Y is docile.
A Pittbull isn't born dangerous. When a person knows how to raise them properly and how to cater to their needs, they can be incredibly sweet dogs:
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The problem is just that a Pittbull is stronger than many other breeds and has a strong instinct to defend, so it's a bigger issue when they have clueless owners who don't know how to raise and socialize their dogs. A improperly raised pittbull can hurt a person, an improperly raised Chihuahua can not really do that. And what's gotta be factored into this is also that a lot of people buy Pittbulls in order to brutalize them and raise them as attack or fighting dogs, due to their strength. But again, that's not the dog's fault, that's the human deliberately screwing up the dog. 

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