Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Daughter of the Nine Moons

Hong Kong Protests

15 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Daughter of the Nine Moons
 
ExpandMyMind

Around 15% of their entire population marching.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dumbledore the Awesome
Posted (edited)

Mmmm. Anyone suspect the fingerprints of the State Department/CIA? It's the usual tactics. Stir up "protests" in whichever country you've selected as your current preferred Adversary, in the hope that it will prompt the government to crack down. Works every time.

Well, it didn't in Venezuela, but we don't talk about that any more. :whistle:

Edited by Dumbledore the Awesome
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
and then

Or maybe it's just people that know what this bill will mean to their future and they aren't yet too gutless to fight for that freedom - like so many others fail to do?  Hmmm...

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Great Old Man

 

Very big issues in S-Korea too, while some Korean mass media which got money from China is afraid to discuss that "protest".

Even some media calls that protest as "riots", really shocking.

It seems clear that If Hong Kong, Taiwan bow their heads to china, next target is ROK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
and then
8 hours ago, Great Old Man said:

 

Very big issues in S-Korea too, while some Korean mass media which got money from China is afraid to discuss that "protest".

Even some media calls that protest as "riots", really shocking.

It seems clear that If Hong Kong, Taiwan bow their heads to china, next target is ROK.

Hong Kong was unexpected but if they give up now, they're done, there will be no coming back.  I hope that the Chinese realize that the Tiananmen approach isn't going to help them here.  OTOH, if they bend to such pressure in the open, what happens if their citizens in China, proper, get rowdy?  This could get ugly.  Capitalism is a tiger they're having to ride and they might not know how to dismount.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Black Red Devil
12 hours ago, Great Old Man said:

 

Very big issues in S-Korea too, while some Korean mass media which got money from China is afraid to discuss that "protest".

Even some media calls that protest as "riots", really shocking.

It seems clear that If Hong Kong, Taiwan bow their heads to china, next target is ROK.

Well, it would have been 'big issues' if instead of the S you had a N in front of Korea.  South Korea has never had it so good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
spartan max2
On 6/9/2019 at 4:42 PM, Dumbledore the Awesome said:

Mmmm. Anyone suspect the fingerprints of the State Department/CIA? It's the usual tactics. Stir up "protests" in whichever country you've selected as your current preferred Adversary, in the hope that it will prompt the government to crack down. Works every time.

Well, it didn't in Venezuela, but we don't talk about that any more. :whistle:

You haven't been paying attention to Hong Kong Chinese relations for the last decade.

The protest is not a suprise. 

I think it's pretty faulty to try to give the U.S credit/blame for the  work of activist in China. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Black Red Devil

How about the Chinese media propaganda machine? :lol:

Chinese state media has been slammed for “blatant Orwellian lying” about the Hong Kong protests after China Daily reported more than 800,000 people had pledged support for the extradition reforms.

link

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
and then
16 minutes ago, spartan max2 said:

I think it's pretty faulty to try to give the U.S credit/blame for the  work of activist in China. 

He can't help himself.  He sees U.S. or Israeli fingerprints on nearly every nefarious action on the planet.  The law of averages will mean he's correct part of the time.  The rest...not so much.  This simmering problem in Hong Kong has been growing quietly for years.  The youth (an undersized population %) are afraid of China's plans and want their freedom.  I'm afraid the only thing that will keep them from being crushed will be the force of international PR against China.  I wish them well in their struggle.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sir Wearer of Hats
Posted (edited)

This is nothing, China already “invites” people from Hong Kong etc to the Mainland to discuss issues, they don’t need new laws in order to do so further. I predict within two years China will be demanding the extradition of a Chinese National who has become a legal citizen of another nation (probably Australia) over “crimes against China”. 

Edited by Sir Wearer of Hats
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
spartan max2
Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

This is nothing, China already “invites” people from Hong Kong etc to the Mainland to discuss issues, they don’t need new laws in order to do so further. I predict within two years China will be demanding the extradition of a Chinese National who has become a legal citizen of another nation (probably Australia) over “crimes against China”. 

Yeah I'm happy about the protest but sadly I do not expect it will do much to stem the flow of China's control over them.

China made it very clear how protest will not do anything with Tiananimen Square.

Edited by spartan max2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fred_mc
Posted (edited)
On 2019-06-14 at 2:48 AM, Black Red Devil said:

Well, it would have been 'big issues' if instead of the S you had a N in front of Korea.  South Korea has never had it so good.

Well, it depends on what you mean with good. People in South Korea are studying/working from early in the morning to late at night, to at least some degree even on Saturdays, and in case there is much to do also on Sundays (at least on a Samsung development center in South Korea that we had contacts with at my job some years ago they were normally working on Saturdays and during periods with much work also on Sundays). It doesn't seem to be much of a life if you ask me, to study/work that much and have so little spare time so I wouldn't want to live in South Korea. I've also understood that society in South Korea is very hierarchical, which I think is not very good, I like flat organizations where everyone can make their voice heard. In that regard, it is similar to North Korea, which is also a hierarchical society.

Edited by fred_mc
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
spartan max2
Posted (edited)

Some more news

The Hong Kong leader rejected the extridition law and apologized for it.  

However the protesters are still growing in numbers because the apology was not good enough. They are mad.

 

Quote

the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday with renewed determination and a lengthening list of demands, rejecting the government’s retreat on a contentious extradition bill and extending the political crisis gripping the semiautonomous territory.

Hong Kong’s embattled leader, Carrie Lam, shelved the bill on Saturday and followed that up with a rare apology the next day, actions that pro-democracy activists dismissed as too little, too late.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/16/world/asia/carrie-lam-hong-kong-protests.html

Edited by spartan max2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Great Old Man
On 2019. 6. 16. at 6:00 PM, fred_mc said:

Well, it depends on what you mean with good. People in South Korea are studying/working from early in the morning to late at night, to at least some degree even on Saturdays, and in case there is much to do also on Sundays (at least on a Samsung development center in South Korea that we had contacts with at my job some years ago they were normally working on Saturdays and during periods with much work also on Sundays). It doesn't seem to be much of a life if you ask me, to study/work that much and have so little spare time so I wouldn't want to live in South Korea. I've also understood that society in South Korea is very hierarchical, which I think is not very good, I like flat organizations where everyone can make their voice heard. In that regard, it is similar to North Korea, which is also a hierarchical society.

Indeed, It makes me sad when I had to work in late night. Too much chicken race.  Hierarchical culture is very common among Asian countries.

Can you believe ROK is the least hierarchical society among China, Japan, DPRK?

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.