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Eldorado

English schools begging for Charity

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Eldorado

A desperate school in financial trouble has asked BBC Children in Need for money to support its disadvantaged pupils.

It follows a pattern of schools reaching out to charities and crowdfunding initiatives to back them financially.

At Wales' Daily Post: https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/cash-strapped-school-approaches-bbc-16417320

"School funding has climbed up the political agenda in recent months, with reports of schools closing early, parents being asked for donations, teachers using their own money to buy basic supplies, and headteachers taking on additional roles including catering, safeguarding and cleaning to save money."

Full report at the UK Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/education/2019/jun/12/school-asks-bbc-children-in-need-to-cover-funding-gap?

 

"More than 1,000 English schools turn to online donations to raise funds"

April report at the Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/education/2019/apr/09/cash-strapped-english-schools-turn-to-online-donations-to-close-funding-gap

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ethereal_scout
Posted (edited)

What did a school classroom (incl teacher) cost in the 1930s, the 1950s, the 1970s, the 1990s. In the 1930s it would have been a single leaf brick building, rudimentary heating, tables, chairs, books and a teacher on basic wage. Fast forward to today and they'll be feeling 'underfunded' if the specification of a typical school can't have a plasma screen TV, along with a couple of computers with the full MS Office suite on it. The buildings are a work of art at millions a piece and the teachers salaries are through the roof. My old high school is looking for a couple of deputies at £70k a piece. Multiply that up for the district where each school needs a headmaster and some deputies and you get to a bill of over a £1M for head masters alone.

Quote

and headteachers taking on additional roles including catering, safeguarding and cleaning to save money

Didums. A typical small business director is on £40k in the 'private sector' - half the headmasters pay and you could get 3 to 4 auxiliary workers to do the cooking and cleaning (usually around £10k pro rata as they're part time). Basically schools are specifying themselves out of affordability and sending their districts an increasingly unaffordable bill.

Basic schooling is now becoming unaffordable and something needs to break.

Edited by ethereal_scout
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itsnotoutthere
Posted (edited)

We've had a poplulation increase of approximately 2.5million in the last 5 years...that alone would have a serious impact on schools, housing and healthcare, as indeed it does.

Edited by itsnotoutthere

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Setton
Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, ethereal_scout said:

What did a school classroom (incl teacher) cost in the 1930s, the 1950s, the 1970s, the 1990s. In the 1930s it would have been a single leaf brick building, rudimentary heating, tables, chairs, books and a teacher on basic wage. Fast forward to today and they'll be feeling 'underfunded' if the specification of a typical school can't have a plasma screen TV, along with a couple of computers with the full MS Office suite on it. The buildings are a work of art at millions a piece and the teachers salaries are through the roof. My old high school is looking for a couple of deputies at £70k a piece. Multiply that up for the district where each school needs a headmaster and some deputies and you get to a bill of over a £1M for head masters alone.

Didums. A typical small business director is on £40k in the 'private sector' - half his pay and you could get 3 to 4 auxiliary workers to do the cooking and cleaning (usually around £10k pro rata as they're part time). Basically schools are specifying themselves out of affordability and sending their districts an increasingly unaffordable bill.

Basic schooling is now becoming unaffordable and something needs to break.

Yes, how dare teachers expect to be paid for their work. It's not like education is important, right? 

Also, the average head teacher salary is £55k. I don't know where you're getting your numbers but perhaps someone should have paid your teachers better. 

Edited by Setton

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ethereal_scout
Posted (edited)
Quote

Also, the average head teacher salary is £55k. I don't know where you're getting your numbers

https://www.myjobscotland.gov.uk/councils/midlothian-council/jobs/head-teacher-strathesk-primary-school-158661?from=org

That's £61.5k for a primary school head.

https://www.myjobscotland.gov.uk/categories/education?salary=28349&changing=salary

That's £84k for a Coatbridge Headmaster.

Edited by ethereal_scout

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L.A.T.1961

I don't think fund raising is a new phenomenon. I remember being given raffle tickets to sell and going on sponsored walks to raise school funds. This was back in the 60's/70's. School trips would often require contributions from parents.

Some of the problems now being felt date back to Blair's time in government.  Despite the Education-Education-Education mantra schools were sold off for their land and turned into housing. Many teachers left the profession during this time as schools closed. The school buildings were irreplaceable in towns, as few other new sites exist in built up areas.

Now there is shortage of, not just teachers but schools to put pupils in.  

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Setton
2 hours ago, ethereal_scout said:

The key word, of course, being 'average'. 

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Setton
13 minutes ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

I don't think fund raising is a new phenomenon. I remember being given raffle tickets to sell and going on sponsored walks to raise school funds. This was back in the 60's/70's. School trips would often require contributions from parents.

Did you ever have to raise £10000 in a term to fix a leaking roof? Because we did when I was teaching. 

Quote

Some of the problems now being felt date back to Blair's time in government.  Despite the Education-Education-Education mantra schools were sold off for their land and turned into housing. Many teachers left the profession during this time as schools closed. The school buildings were irreplaceable in towns, as few other new sites exist in built up areas.

Now there is shortage of, not just teachers but schools to put pupils in.  

To some extent, maybe. The majority of problems though stem from the current government's chronic underfunding of education and its woeful mismanagement of the sector. 

If they actually listened to teachers they might be able to retain more than half the ones they train (yes, half leave into he first 5 years) without having to offer extra money. 

Unfortunately, the simple truth is that, even with wages where they are, most teachers at the lower end of the scale are effectively paid below minimum wage. 

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