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Eldorado

Neglect of US elders still not being reported

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Eldorado
Posted (edited)

"Nursing facilities have failed to report thousands of serious cases of potential neglect and abuse of seniors on Medicare even though it's a federal requirement for them to do so, according to a watchdog report released Wednesday that calls for a new focus on protecting frail patients."

"Auditors with the Health and Human Services inspector general's office drilled down on episodes serious enough that the patient was taken straight from a nursing facility to a hospital emergency room."

Full report at the ABC: https://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/watchdog-neglect-abuse-unreported-nursing-facilities-63652888

"Health Workers Still Aren't Alerting Police About Likely Elder Abuse, Reports Find"

At NPR (radio): https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/06/12/731820729/reports-find-health-workers-still-arent-alerting-police-regarding-likely-elder-a?t=1560359969862

 

"Elder abuse is a critical social, health, and economic problem. Approximately 10 percent of adults age 60 and older have experienced physical abuse, psychological or verbal abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, or financial exploitation. Older Americans lose an estimated $2.9 billion a year as a result of financial exploitation. In the most heartbreaking cases, it means the complete loss of savings earned through decades of hard work. "

Full report at the US Dept of HHS: https://www.hhs.gov/blog/2018/06/15/elder-abuse-public-health-issue-affects-all-us.html

Edited by Eldorado
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Desertrat56

Yep, because their employees are often the ones doing the neglect and abuse.  One physical rehab center my dad was in was being paid by medicare to help him walk again.  They gave him one hour of physical therapy a day and kept him so drugged up he couldn't move the other 23 hours a day.  The facility was clean and quiet (too quiet).  Since he never was able to walk on his own he ended up in a nursing home that was falling apart.  I don't have guardianship over him, an attorney does because of legal issues he caused, so I complained and the attorney went to visit him.  She agreed it was a horrible place.  The person in charge of his medical care had chosen that place, and works for one of those companies that is supposed to  manage someone's care when they need help.  It irks me that he is so careless, but I am the "estranged daughter" so I have no say and he does not return my calls.

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aztek

of course they do not report themselves, kinda naive to expect them to

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Tatetopa

It is a nightmare for all of us still healthy and able to live on our own.  If we live another 10 or 20 years, will we wind up as a comatose resource for a care facility corporation draining our dollars and benefits and keeping us alive as long as possible?  Or at least until the money runs out.

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Desertrat56
13 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

It is a nightmare for all of us still healthy and able to live on our own.  If we live another 10 or 20 years, will we wind up as a comatose resource for a care facility corporation draining our dollars and benefits and keeping us alive as long as possible?  Or at least until the money runs out.

Good question.  I took care of my mother for 2 years before she died.  Because of that she got to stay in her own home, but it was very hard because I had very little backup until the last 2 months.  I don't want either of my daughters to go through that so I plan on making some kind of arrangements and I am seriously thinking of taking a long trip to the "outback" and not coming home if I get in the shape my mother was in.   Her sister, who is now 86, has expressed the same wish, to just walk out into the desert and not come back, rather than letting her daughter find her dead one day.  I think U.S. Americans are very afraid of death as a culture, which makes it very difficult to be reasonable in the face of it.

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Grandpa Greenman

I don't even have to read the article, I have been in rehabs which doubled as nursing homes.  I've had loved ones in nursing homes.  It can be a nightmare, even if you have the cognitive ability to talk.   If you have a loved one in care, you have to be johnny on the spot.  Visit often and just show up when you can, without telling them you are coming. 

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Imaginarynumber1

Nursing homes are a disgusting scam. Constantly rebranding and high turnover

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Grandpa Greenman
3 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

Good question.  I took care of my mother for 2 years before she died.  Because of that she got to stay in her own home, but it was very hard because I had very little backup until the last 2 months.  I don't want either of my daughters to go through that so I plan on making some kind of arrangements and I am seriously thinking of taking a long trip to the "outback" and not coming home if I get in the shape my mother was in.   Her sister, who is now 86, has expressed the same wish, to just walk out into the desert and not come back, rather than letting her daughter find her dead one day.  I think U.S. Americans are very afraid of death as a culture, which makes it very difficult to be reasonable in the face of it.

Not as easy as to plan that as you think it is. From my experience, things don't usually happen as planned. You can be going along just fine, then BOOM, you are flat on your back on a gurney for any number of reasons and you're not walking anywhere.  You also don't always know what the outcome is going to be.  I have seen people come back from strokes who the doctors thought wouldn't. Hats off to you taking care of your mother.  Not everybody can do that, I did it, I went from taking care of my wife, to my mother, all while being disabled myself. It is an act of love to do.  It is to bad the homes and their workers can't do it with love and honor.  This is one case where you get what you pay for.

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Desertrat56
Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Grandpa Greenman said:

Not as easy as to plan that as you think it is. From my experience, things don't usually happen as planned. You can be going along just fine, then BOOM, you are flat on your back on a gurney for any number of reasons and you're not walking anywhere.  You also don't always know what the outcome is going to be.  I have seen people come back from strokes who the doctors thought wouldn't. Hats off to you taking care of your mother.  Not everybody can do that, I did it, I went from taking care of my wife, to my mother, all while being disabled myself. It is an act of love to do.  It is to bad the homes and their workers can't do it with love and honor.  This is one case where you get what you pay for.

Yes, that is true, there is no planning some things.  In the case of getting what you pay for, that is not always the case either.  My uncle had his wife in the most expensive nursing home in the city and one night he went to visit her and she was screaming in pain.  That morning someone had lifted her to change the sheets and dropped her on the floor breaking her hip, they just put her back in bed as if nothing happened and when the nurse checked on her she wrote in the chart "complaining of pain but nothing wrong".  When my uncle got her to the emergency room they ER staff were horrified to find that mold was growing all over her body from not being cleaned properly.  He took her home when they had her ailments taken care of and he just fixed his house up to be wheelchair accessible, then he took on the care of his sister and brother in law, so he was caring for 3 invalids in his house.   It is an act of love and I do not regret taking care of my mother, as my uncle never regretted the commitment of the three he took care of.   As for my father, even if one of his children were willing to take care of him in his home he would not let them.  He is a narcissist who treats family like the enemy and strangers like family.  He is in the best place he can be in now.

Edited by Desertrat56
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and then
2 hours ago, aztek said:

of course they do not report themselves, kinda naive to expect them to

When my father-in-law was in such a facility, we'd come at odd hours to check on him and I made it clear to them that mistreating him would be a really bad move.  Sometimes you have to act like an ass to get people's attention and he was one that was worth it, for sure.  

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Tatetopa
4 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

Good question.  I took care of my mother for 2 years before she died.  Because of that she got to stay in her own home, but it was very hard because I had very little backup until the last 2 months.  I don't want either of my daughters to go through that so I plan on making some kind of arrangements and I am seriously thinking of taking a long trip to the "outback" and not coming home if I get in the shape my mother was in.   Her sister, who is now 86, has expressed the same wish, to just walk out into the desert and not come back, rather than letting her daughter find her dead one day.  I think U.S. Americans are very afraid of death as a culture, which makes it very difficult to be reasonable in the face of it.

I really respect you for that.  My wife's mom had Alzheimer and got to be pretty dependent on a care facility for the last years of her life.  It was a bad way to go.  At 85 my mom decided it was time and stopped eating. Her three kids  and a bunch of the grandkids  gt to spend time with her on the last couple of days.  She was funny, alert, cheerful, and certain it was time for her.  She passed peacefully  just a couple of minutes after the last of us , my sister and I left the room.  If I could choose, that would be the way.  It was the best passing of my parents and my wife's parents.

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