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Still Waters

Ancient dogs weren’t the workhorses we thought

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Still Waters

Dogs and humans have been buddies for at least 20,000 years. For most of that time, it was thought that the relationship had been primarily about work—not belly rubs and games of fetch. Early dogs had jobs, like pulling sleds in the tundra or hunting with early humans in Jordan. At least, that’s what archaeologists suspected based on a spinal condition in ancient canine bones called spondylosis deformans, which for decades has been interpreted as a sign that a dog engaged in carrying or pulling.

But a new study published in the journal PLOS One calls that idea into question, suggesting that the spine issues are a sign the dogs lived long, healthy lives.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/ancient-dogs-werent-workhorses-we-thought-180972429/

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Piney
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Still Waters said:

But a new study published in the journal PLOS One calls that idea into question, suggesting that the spine issues are a sign the dogs lived long, healthy lives.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/ancient-dogs-werent-workhorses-we-thought-180972429/

We had the skeleton of a female Carolina dog on display at the Cumberland Prehistory Museum who was about 12 years old and buried with full honors. ( a Funeral Feast). 

Edited by Piney
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jaylemurph

Yeah, Our Past Basset Masters didn’t create humans so they could work /more/. Sheesh. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Hammerclaw

Humans have always had a predilection for keeping pets and a lot of animals seem genuinely captivated by the young of other species. It's as if they're wire that way to respond to the cute and cuddly of their own young  and sometimes react to the young of other species. I suspect the young of other species taken in, were the gateway to domestication by humans.

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