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Still Waters

Sword found 30 yrs ago ID as 'Knights Templar'

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Still Waters

A sword discovered 30 years ago in Shropshire’s mysterious Caynton caves has been identified as a precious 13th Century weapon potentially belonging to a member of the Knights Templar.

Mark Lawton found the rusty blade in the man-made underground chambers near Beckbury in the late 1980s, taking it home with him and keeping it on his windowsill.

He only discovered its true origins when he decided to send the unusual object to local auctioneers to have it evaluated.

https://www.anglenews.com/sword-found-in-shropshires-mysterious-caynton-caves-actually-belongs-to-13thc-knights-templar/

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South Alabam

I think the price it could fetch is relatively low. Seems it would bring a lot more.

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Stiff
41 minutes ago, South Alabam said:

I think the price it could fetch is relatively low. Seems it would bring a lot more.

I thought the same. That doesn't seem a lot of money for something which many would find so revered.

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Seti42
Posted (edited)

Yeah, you'd think it'd bring in more money...Especially seeing the photo in the link. The condition actually seems pretty good for such an old sword. I've seen swords in museums from that time period in worse shape, ie: no pommel, no quillon, etc. 

Edit: Just read the linked article. Apparently, some people tried to 'clean it up' so there's new file marks, etc. on it. That probably devalued it significantly. 

Edited by Seti42
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South Alabam
Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, Seti42 said:

Yeah, you'd think it'd bring in more money...Especially seeing the photo in the link. The condition actually seems pretty good for such an old sword. I've seen swords in museums from that time period in worse shape, ie: no pommel, no quillon, etc. 

Edit: Just read the linked article. Apparently, some people tried to 'clean it up' so there's new file marks, etc. on it. That probably devalued it significantly. 

You'd think just by the number in existence, which has to be low, even with file marks it would bring more. Kind of weird the way they value stuff, not to mention the Historical, and religious and legendary significance of it.

Edited by South Alabam
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hetrodoxly

I live in Shropshire but never heard of this cave, you can see by this video why they were forgotten.

 

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AllPossible

$1900. ??? Wow you can't say fetch in & $1900 in the same sentence. Just doesn't correlate right lol

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DirtyDocMartens

I'd pay $1900 for it, and I'm dead broke.

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godnodog

You want templar swords, come to Portugal, we've got plenty of these

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Piney
On 6/22/2019 at 6:23 PM, godnodog said:

You want templar swords, come to Portugal, we've got plenty of these

In better shape. Which is probably why it isn't worth much. 

It could of belonged to any hedge knight or man-at-arms. The whole "Templar" part is purely a guess. 

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qxcontinuum

A samurai sword from WW2 would fetch more money at auction

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hetrodoxly

I don't think they're that rare, here's an interesting one, The sword was discovered in the 19th century in the River Witham near Lincoln in northern England.

While the sword’s design is similar to others found and depicted in illuminated manuscripts from the same period, it has several distinctive features, namely an inscription down the length of the blade. Written in gold wire inlaid on one side of the blade, the inscription has baffled scholars for more than a century. It appears to read “+NDXOXCHWDRGHDXORVI+” and experts believe it has religious significance, writes Harrison. However, the language it was written in is still a mystery, making it impossible to translate.
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/swords-inscription-800-year-old-mystery-180956147/

 

 

https://ashleycowie.com/new-blog/the-encoded-crusaders-sword

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skliss
Posted (edited)

Thanks for adding the link with the picture of the 2nd sword. The bit at the end about the cross potent was interesting.

As for the inscription...maybe it's the knights name in Welsh..isn't that what Welsh looks like? Just kiddin'.....  :D 

Edited by skliss
Replaced a word

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hetrodoxly
Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, skliss said:

Thanks for adding the link with the picture of the 2nd sword. The bit at the end about the cross potent was interesting.

As for the inscription...maybe it's the knights name in Welsh..isn't that what Welsh looks like? Just kiddin'.....  :D 

“+NDXOXCHWDRGHDXORVI+” is a bit short for a Welsh word :D  it could be a Welsh village i think i've visited ;'LLANDXOXCHWDRGHDXORVI' :D

It says in the article 'X' could be a symbol for the Christian Cross, ND O CHWDRGHD ORVI, when i get the time i'll have to do some research 'ORVI' sounds familiar.

Edited by hetrodoxly
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