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ExpandMyMind

Germany's Angela Merkel seen shaking again

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Helen of Annoy
13 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

Get a sense of humour, how did you think the Germans lost theirs.

I'm quite certain this thread has shown you're not the right person to advise anyone on matters of humour.  

You keep trying, though, it is funny only not in the way you'd hope. 

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A rather obscure Bassoon
On 6/28/2019 at 12:20 PM, Helen of Annoy said:

She'd be perfect for that job so I hope whatever it is (I'm thinking fluctuating blood sugar and being simply so tired and so stressed for such a long time), will go away after she takes a break. 

Or maybe like Juncker she likes a little tipple either way Herr Merkel in charge of the EU Brexit can't come fast enough.

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Helen of Annoy
Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, A rather obscure Bassoon said:

Or maybe like Juncker she likes a little tipple either way Herr Merkel in charge of the EU Brexit can't come fast enough.

Actually, weird grammar and lack of punctuation, like in that sentence of yours, are far more typical for alcohol abuse. Of course, for a whole host of other possible problems as well. 

While Merkel obviously didn't like this heat wave, as most of us didn't, she still was absolutely coherent as ever. So I doubt she shares any of your most likely problems.

 

Regarding Brexit, the EU is waiting for the Brexiters to finally get out. It really does start to look like either they're stalling on purpose, either they need help to get out an opened door. 

Edited by Helen of Annoy
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A rather obscure Bassoon
39 minutes ago, Helen of Annoy said:

Actually, weird grammar and lack of punctuation, like in that sentence of yours, are far more typical for alcohol abuse. 

Too much Punctuation means you have way too much time on your hands.

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RabidMongoose
9 hours ago, Helen of Annoy said:

Actually, weird grammar and lack of punctuation, like in that sentence of yours, are far more typical for alcohol abuse. Of course, for a whole host of other possible problems as well. 

While Merkel obviously didn't like this heat wave, as most of us didn't, she still was absolutely coherent as ever. So I doubt she shares any of your most likely problems.

Regarding Brexit, the EU is waiting for the Brexiters to finally get out. It really does start to look like either they're stalling on purpose, either they need help to get out an opened door. 

lol

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aztek

lmao, grammar nazis strike again.

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Helen of Annoy
17 hours ago, A rather obscure Bassoon said:

Too much Punctuation means you have way too much time on your hands.

It's a little illogical that you have no time for proper punctuation, but you do have time for unnecessary capitalisation. 

In English, common nouns are not capitalised. (Just because certain reality show 'celebrity' is prone to random capitalisation in his tweets does not mean the rules have changed, it only means that this person is not exactly literate.)  

 

   

4 hours ago, aztek said:

lmao, grammar nazis strike again.

You're excused. I only hope you're not butchering Russian the way you butcher English.

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RabidMongoose
Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, Helen of Annoy said:

It's a little illogical that you have no time for proper punctuation, but you do have time for unnecessary capitalisation. 

In English, common nouns are not capitalised. (Just because certain reality show 'celebrity' is prone to random capitalisation in his tweets does not mean the rules have changed, it only means that this person is not exactly literate.)  

You're excused. I only hope you're not butchering Russian the way you butcher English.

The . comes after the ) lol.

Edited by RabidMongoose

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Helen of Annoy
35 minutes ago, RabidMongoose said:

The . comes after the ) lol.

It's a complete, independent sentence. So it ends with full-stop, naturally, and only then I close the brackets I've opened before I started the sentence. 

If it was just a part of a sentence that was inside the brackets, not a full sentence, then you would be right.   

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RabidMongoose
2 hours ago, Helen of Annoy said:

It's a complete, independent sentence. So it ends with full-stop, naturally, and only then I close the brackets I've opened before I started the sentence. 

If it was just a part of a sentence that was inside the brackets, not a full sentence, then you would be right.   

Back to English grammar school for you!

You have much to learn before you become a grammar Nazi again lmao.

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Helen of Annoy
14 minutes ago, RabidMongoose said:

Back to English grammar school for you!

You have much to learn before you become a grammar Nazi again lmao.

I'm afraid it's you who has to attend English grammar school. Apparently for the first time. 

 

Literally the first link that popped up: 

https://www.turnerink.co.uk/punctuation-tips/full-stops-inside-or-outside-of-brackets/

 

 

Quote

 

k, this is a short answer. A full stop appears inside the brackets, if the bracket contains a complete sentence.

She wore the red dress that evening. (Her sister wore the gold one.)
John needed the answer for question 7. (Jeff was struggling with question 1.)

The full stop appears outside of the brackets if the brackets don’t contain a complete sentence.

She wore the red dress that evening (and her sister wore the gold one).
John needed the answer for question 7 (however Jeff was struggling with question 1).

Simple, no?

 

Apparently, not simple enough for everyone :lol: 

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RabidMongoose
2 minutes ago, Helen of Annoy said:

I'm afraid it's you who has to attend English grammar school. Apparently for the first time. 

Literally the first link that popped up: 

https://www.turnerink.co.uk/punctuation-tips/full-stops-inside-or-outside-of-brackets/

Apparently, not simple enough for everyone :lol: 

I have just checked this out and I never....

You are actually right. Wow. I only ever used it the other way.

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Helen of Annoy
5 minutes ago, RabidMongoose said:

I have just checked this out and I never....

You are actually right. Wow. I only ever used it the other way.

To be honest, sane people usually do put only parts of sentences in the brackets. Whole sentences in the brackets are not seen that often. It's just us, the longwinded ones, that end up with whole sentences in the brackets.    

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A rather obscure Bassoon
5 hours ago, Helen of Annoy said:

It's a little illogical that you have no time for proper punctuation, but you do have time for unnecessary capitalisation. 

In English, common nouns are not capitalised. (Just because certain reality show 'celebrity' is prone to random capitalisation in his tweets does not mean the rules have changed, it only means that this person is not exactly literate.)  

 

   

You're excused. I only hope you're not butchering Russian the way you butcher English.

I stand corrected but sometimes I really can't be bothered too much when I'm typing.

Enough of this already and back on topic before the Mods jump on us from a great height.

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hetrodoxly
7 hours ago, Helen of Annoy said:

In English, common nouns are not capitalised. (Just because certain reality show 'celebrity' is prone to random capitalisation in his tweets does not mean the rules have changed, it only means that this person is not exactly literate.)  

why have you put that sentence in brackets?

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Helen of Annoy
18 hours ago, A rather obscure Bassoon said:

I stand corrected but sometimes I really can't be bothered too much when I'm typing.

Enough of this already and back on topic before the Mods jump on us from a great height.

:yes:

Only I'd say we pretty much exhausted the topic... looks like Merkel's health is fine, she's not taking any EU functions yet... all in all, nothing really. 

 

 

16 hours ago, hetrodoxly said:

why have you put that sentence in brackets?

Because it's rather off topic, therefore not that important, but still, I considered it worth mentioning. Brackets are there to make it clear it's only a side remark.  

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hetrodoxly
24 minutes ago, Helen of Annoy said:

:yes:

Only I'd say we pretty much exhausted the topic... looks like Merkel's health is fine, she's not taking any EU functions yet... all in all, nothing really. 

 

 

Because it's rather off topic, therefore not that important, but still, I considered it worth mentioning. Brackets are there to make it clear it's only a side remark.  

It's a statement not extra information within your first sentence.

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Helen of Annoy
13 minutes ago, hetrodoxly said:

It's a statement not extra information within your first sentence.

Don't act so desperately in public.

If a part of the sentence is in the brackets, there will be no full-stop before the closing bracket, even if there are no other parts of the sentence after the bracket.

If it's a whole sentence in the brackets, you end it with the full-stop, absolutely, and then you close the bracket. Because you opened it before the first letter of the sentence. 

It can't be any more logical. Any attempt to imagine a mistake in the way I wrote it only makes you seem incapable of understanding extremely simple bracket rules.

The quality, intention or tone of the sentence does not play a role here, all that matters is if the whole sentence or a part of it is within the brackets.

Also, my first sentence was statement, my second sentence, the bracketed one, was additional, marginal comment. Not that it matters, as I just explained it to you, but the additional contents is in the brackets. 

 

So, any thoughts on topic? 

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hetrodoxly
28 minutes ago, Helen of Annoy said:

Don't act so desperately in public.

If a part of the sentence is in the brackets, there will be no full-stop before the closing bracket, even if there are no other parts of the sentence after the bracket.

If it's a whole sentence in the brackets, you end it with the full-stop, absolutely, and then you close the bracket. Because you opened it before the first letter of the sentence. 

It can't be any more logical. Any attempt to imagine a mistake in the way I wrote it only makes you seem incapable of understanding extremely simple bracket rules.

The quality, intention or tone of the sentence does not play a role here, all that matters is if the whole sentence or a part of it is within the brackets.

Also, my first sentence was statement, my second sentence, the bracketed one, was additional, marginal comment. Not that it matters, as I just explained it to you, but the additional contents is in the brackets. 

 

So, any thoughts on topic? 

Utter nonsense.

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RabidMongoose
32 minutes ago, Helen of Annoy said:

Don't act so desperately in public.

If a part of the sentence is in the brackets, there will be no full-stop before the closing bracket, even if there are no other parts of the sentence after the bracket.

If it's a whole sentence in the brackets, you end it with the full-stop, absolutely, and then you close the bracket. Because you opened it before the first letter of the sentence. 

It can't be any more logical. Any attempt to imagine a mistake in the way I wrote it only makes you seem incapable of understanding extremely simple bracket rules.

The quality, intention or tone of the sentence does not play a role here, all that matters is if the whole sentence or a part of it is within the brackets.

Also, my first sentence was statement, my second sentence, the bracketed one, was additional, marginal comment. Not that it matters, as I just explained it to you, but the additional contents is in the brackets. 

 

So, any thoughts on topic? 

When the UK leaves the EU and doesnt implode economy your dream of being a German satellite state will start to unravel. I predict, Italy will be the 2nd to leave.

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Helen of Annoy
1 hour ago, hetrodoxly said:

Utter nonsense.

You've got link up there. Or find your own. It's your language. 

How can you refuse to learn your own language?! 

Your own language... respect it, do not butcher it just because you want to 'win' special Olympics - which is what most of Internet threads are. It turns out I appreciate and protect your language more than you do. Because it doesn't ****ing matter who was right and who was wrong, what matters is that now we've learnt to use brackets properly. 

Those of us capable of learning, that is.  

 

1 hour ago, RabidMongoose said:

When the UK leaves the EU and doesnt implode economy your dream of being a German satellite state will start to unravel. I predict, Italy will be the 2nd to leave.

That's not exactly on topic, but I'll humour you.

Contrary to what you've been lead to believe, your country is not that, what keeps the EU together. It's the patient and intelligent people, from each member state, who care about the future that keep it together.  

Italy is going through rather pitiful to watch experiment with 'amateur' politicians whose radical anti-EU rhetoric in the campaign was realised in zero amount. Similar to other 'populists', they use the phrases their base likes, but they take great care not to actually carry out any of the idiotic promises they made. 

To take this back on topic, president of the EU Parliament, Antonio Tajani, who happens to be an Italian, made some hilariously inappropriate, pro-fascist and expansionist remarks. It's not a problem just because it was ridiculously extreme right-wing, it's a problem because he displayed immaturity and irresponsibility that should be impossible for a person in his position. 

I can't imagine Angela Merkel, for example, blathering in highly incendiary fashion, in public, like he regularly does. 

The EU needs people like Merkel in top positions. Experienced, capable of staying calm, dedicated. These top positions are protocolary, but they send message both about us and to us. 

Are we a bunch of neglected children, breaking toys in egotist rage or are we adults able to create our own future?         

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hetrodoxly
Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, Helen of Annoy said:

You've got link up there. Or find your own. It's your language. 

How can you refuse to learn your own language?! 

Your own language... respect it, do not butcher it just because you want to 'win' special Olympics - which is what most of Internet threads are. It turns out I appreciate and protect your language more than you do. Because it doesn't ****ing matter who was right and who was wrong, what matters is that now we've learnt to use brackets properly. 

Those of us capable of learning, that is.  

You're not English so i'll forgive the bad grammar but you're just plain wrong (you're not the only one) about brackets, admit it.

Edited by hetrodoxly

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RabidMongoose
Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, Helen of Annoy said:

You've got link up there. Or find your own. It's your language. 

How can you refuse to learn your own language?! 

Your own language... respect it, do not butcher it just because you want to 'win' special Olympics - which is what most of Internet threads are. It turns out I appreciate and protect your language more than you do. Because it doesn't ****ing matter who was right and who was wrong, what matters is that now we've learnt to use brackets properly. 

Those of us capable of learning, that is.  

That's not exactly on topic, but I'll humour you.

Contrary to what you've been lead to believe, your country is not that, what keeps the EU together. It's the patient and intelligent people, from each member state, who care about the future that keep it together.  

Italy is going through rather pitiful to watch experiment with 'amateur' politicians whose radical anti-EU rhetoric in the campaign was realised in zero amount. Similar to other 'populists', they use the phrases their base likes, but they take great care not to actually carry out any of the idiotic promises they made. 

To take this back on topic, president of the EU Parliament, Antonio Tajani, who happens to be an Italian, made some hilariously inappropriate, pro-fascist and expansionist remarks. It's not a problem just because it was ridiculously extreme right-wing, it's a problem because he displayed immaturity and irresponsibility that should be impossible for a person in his position. 

I can't imagine Angela Merkel, for example, blathering in highly incendiary fashion, in public, like he regularly does. 

The EU needs people like Merkel in top positions. Experienced, capable of staying calm, dedicated. These top positions are protocolary, but they send message both about us and to us. 

Are we a bunch of neglected children, breaking toys in egotist rage or are we adults able to create our own future?         

Precisely, the UK are adults able to create their own future.

We dont need to sell out to the EU because we are the greatest people that have ever lived. We just need to get back to doing what we are good at. Using our own ingenuity to build our own future for our own people. Merkel is not some kind of saviour, she will flood the EU with ridiculous numbers of migrants.

In the UK we are proper men, we dont give up our freedom out of fear of war. We make difficult choices when needed and thats why we will be great again. There are no scared men here.

Edited by RabidMongoose

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Helen of Annoy
54 minutes ago, hetrodoxly said:

You're not English so i'll forgive the bad grammar but you're just plain wrong (you're not the only one) about brackets, admit it.

Of course my grammar is bad, I'm not a native speaker. But yours is much worse. That's unnatural. Especially since you wish to pose as a nationalist. A nationalist must have perfect command of their own language. 

Besides, post #36. I gave the link to the blog where native speaker explains these very simple rules.

You are wrong. 

That's not a problem. Anyone can be and is wrong, daily. The problem is that you refuse to accept that, which leads into even bigger problem: you will never learn how to do it right. 

 

38 minutes ago, RabidMongoose said:

Precisely, the UK are adults able to create their own future.

We dont need to sell out to the EU because we are the greatest people that have ever lived. We just need to get back to doing what we are good at. Using our own ingenuity to build our own future for our own people. Merkel is not some kind of saviour, she will flood the EU with ridiculous numbers of migrants.

In the UK we are proper men, we dont give up our freedom out of fear of war. We make difficult choices when needed and thats why we will be great again. There are no scared men here.

Morbidly funny, certainly, but it's boring already. 

 

 

Well, bye, guys. 

It was an outright pleasure to see you do this to yourself again.  

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RabidMongoose

Right now Helen of Annoy is sat at home thinking...

Those English people, they are all crazy lol

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