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Still Waters

Woolly rhino teeth among finds in Welsh cave

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Still Waters

Woolly rhino teeth were among finds discovered in an archaeological dig at a cave in Denbighshire.

The prehistoric fangs were discovered in the Ffynnon Beuno cave in Tremeirchion.

The site has been dubbed one of the UK's most important as it is one of only three where early modern humans and late Neanderthals lived.

Along with other animal teeth and bone fragments, a piece of flint worked by early humans was also found.

The team, led by Dr Rob Dinnis, was excavating a previously unexplored fissure in the cave, and examining discarded material left by Victorian archaeologists.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-48968780

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DieChecker

I didn't know the rhinos got that far West. I thought they were more central Europe and into Asia.

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Tatetopa
Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, DieChecker said:

I didn't know the rhinos got that far West. I thought they were more central Europe and into Asia.

You know they found a woolly rhino cast in an ash field on the Washington side of the Colombia only a couple hundred miles upriver from Portland.  Body, legs, and part of the head  formed a little cave.   Kinda like the humans and animals preserved in Pompeii. 

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In July 1935, two Seattle couples hiking near Blue Lake in Grant County in Eastern Washington clamber into a cave of basalt. They notice it has an unusual shape, sort of like the mold of large, upside down animal. They also find a few bones. Word of the bones soon reaches geologist George Beck at Washington State Normal School (now Central Washington University), who examines the bones and the cave and determines that the cave is a mold of a rhinoceros that  died 15 million years ago. A basalt flow had covered the dead and bloated beast, preserving a mold of its body in stone. It is one of the most unusual fossils known.

https://historylink.org/File/9409

 

Edited by Still Waters
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Carnoferox
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Tatetopa said:

You know they found a woolly rhino cast in an ash field on the Washington side of the Colombia only a couple hundred miles upriver from Portland.  Body, legs, and part of the head  formed a little cave.   Kinda like the humans and animals preserved in Pompeii. 

In July 1935, two Seattle couples hiking near Blue Lake in Grant County in Eastern Washington clamber into a cave of basalt. They notice it has an unusual shape, sort of like the mold of large, upside down animal. They also find a few bones. Word of the bones soon reaches geologist George Beck at Washington State Normal School (now Central Washington University), who examines the bones and the cave and determines that the cave is a mold of a rhinoceros that  died 15 million years ago. A basalt flow had covered the dead and bloated beast, preserving a mold of its body in stone. It is one of the most unusual fossils known.

The Blue Lake rhino isn't a woolly rhino (Coelodonta antiquitatis), it's a Diceratherium. Woolly rhinos are only found in Eurasia and they never migrated to North America.

https://sci-hub.tw/10.1130/0016-7606(1951)62[907:moarib]2.0.co;2

http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/pdf_files/130/1301006236.pdf

Edited by Carnoferox
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Tatetopa
1 hour ago, Carnoferox said:

The Blue Lake rhino isn't a woolly rhino (Coelodonta antiquitatis), it's a Diceratherium. Woolly rhinos are only found in Eurasia and they never migrated to North America.

Thank you so much.  At the time I postred, I was thinking it was way too old by about 14+ million years too.  Thanks for catching.

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Manwon Lender
2 hours ago, Carnoferox said:

The Blue Lake rhino isn't a woolly rhino (Coelodonta antiquitatis), it's a Diceratherium. Woolly rhinos are only found in Eurasia and they never migrated to North America.

https://sci-hub.tw/10.1130/0016-7606(1951)62[907:moarib]2.0.co;2

http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/pdf_files/130/1301006236.pdf

Thanks very much for your input, it's great to have people like you contributing information here. It certainly helps a great deal to  make sure the correct information is posted.

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