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Still Waters

9,000 year-old settlement found in Israel

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Still Waters

Thousands of pieces of tools, jewellery, figurines, seeds and other objects have been found at the site of a huge 9,000-year-old settlement from the Neolithic period uncovered in Israel.

Archaeologists believe that the site, located near Motza Junction, 5km (3 miles) west of Jerusalem, was once a city housing as many as 3,000 residents.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-49002046

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RoofGardener

A city of 3000 people 9000 years ago ? That's surely extraordinary ? 

How did they manage to supply water (and sanitation) to such a large number of people ? 

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Still Waters
49 minutes ago, RoofGardener said:

A city of 3000 people 9000 years ago ? That's surely extraordinary ? 

How did they manage to supply water (and sanitation) to such a large number of people ? 

From a different source link:

Quote

In the ancient, unrecorded past as well as today, the site is situated on the banks of Nahal Sorek and other water sources. The fertile valley is on an ancient path connecting the Shefela (foothills) region to Jerusalem, said the IAA. “These optimal conditions are a central reason for long-term settlement on this site, from the Epipaleolithic Period, around 20,000 years ago, to the present day,” according to the press release.

https://www.timesofisrael.com/vast-and-developed-9000-year-old-settlement-uncovered-near-jerusalem/

 

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RoofGardener

It begs the question; why did it disappear ? Why didn't it thrive, and remain as a major city (such as Jerusalem or Baghdad) today ? 

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Not A Rockstar

It is close to Jerusalem it says and a highway runs through it with a large buildup across the river so it seems still populated a good bit.

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jaylemurph
5 hours ago, RoofGardener said:

It begs the question; why did it disappear ? Why didn't it thrive, and remain as a major city (such as Jerusalem or Baghdad) today ? 

Because according to legend, the neighbors’ new god got all uppity and on his commands they started killing anybody who wasn’t Hebrew. 

—Jaylemurph 

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RoofGardener
9 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

Because according to legend, the neighbors’ new god got all uppity and on his commands they started killing anybody who wasn’t Hebrew. 

—Jaylemurph 

Truly ? Well, that was JOLLY rude of them ! 

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docyabut2
Posted (edited)
On ‎7‎/‎16‎/‎2019 at 8:46 AM, Still Waters said:

Thousands of pieces of tools, jewellery, figurines, seeds and other objects have been found at the site of a huge 9,000-year-old settlement from the Neolithic period uncovered in Israel.

Archaeologists believe that the site, located near Motza Junction, 5km (3 miles) west of Jerusalem, was once a city housing as many as 3,000 residents.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-49002046

wonder if the articles were from Moses :) or could have been a culture out of Africa 200,00 years ago   

Edited by docyabut2

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Manwon Lender
On 7/16/2019 at 10:48 PM, Still Waters said:

From a different source link:

 

This will be a game changer, a lot of what we thought knew will be thrown out the window. 

Great thread, thanks for sharing.

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jaylemurph
On 7/28/2019 at 7:16 PM, Manwon Lender said:

This will be a game changer, a lot of what we thought knew will be thrown out the window. 

Great thread, thanks for sharing.

What exactly is it going ti change?

—Jaylemurph 

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Manwon Lender
4 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

What exactly is it going ti change?

—Jaylemurph 

This is the oldest known settlement found, anywhere in the world.

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jaylemurph
33 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

This is the oldest known settlement found, anywhere in the world.

So what, exactly, is so totally changed? What is "going out the window"?

And it's not the oldest settlement found, it's the oldest city. Big, big difference.

--Jaylemurph

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Manwon Lender
9 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

So what, exactly, is so totally changed? What is "going out the window"?

And it's not the oldest settlement found, it's the oldest city. Big, big difference.

--Jaylemurph

Thanks for the correction, city.  The dates and time frame of when cities were first built and inhabited, will be a major change to our knowledge. This will cause much history to be rewritten.

sorry if you don't agree.

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jaylemurph
9 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

Thanks for the correction, city.  The dates and time frame of when cities were first built and inhabited, will be a major change to our knowledge. This will cause much history to be rewritten.

sorry if you don't agree.

I guess I can't make myself any clearer asking what exactly is going to be different. And apparently you can't or won't answer the question. 

--Jaylemurph 

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Manwon Lender
2 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

I guess I can't make myself any clearer asking what exactly is going to be different. And apparently you can't or won't answer the question. 

--Jaylemurph 

You obviously have an opinion on this subject please post it. 

I know you don't agree with mine, it will save time.

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jaylemurph

I’m asking you something specific, which you seem unable or unwilling to answer. 

For example:

You: The color of this table has changed! This will rewrite history!

Me: In what way?

You: It changes history.

Me: That’s not an answer to what I asked. If everything is going to change, you should be able to describe one, specific, exact change. 

You: Everything we know about tables will change!

Me: You’ve already said that.

You: Change!

Me: What a table is has not changed. How we make tables has not changed. How we use them has not changed. The change in this particular table has not changed very much. So little in fact you cannot demonstrate anything has changed. 

You: You obviously don’t understand  

Me: Yep, I clearly have learned nothing from this exchange.

—Jaylemurph 

 

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Manwon Lender
Posted (edited)
48 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

I’m asking you something specific, which you seem unable or unwilling to answer. 

For example:

You: The color of this table has changed! This will rewrite history!

Me: In what way?

You: It changes history.

Me: That’s not an answer to what I asked. If everything is going to change, you should be able to describe one, specific, exact change. 

You: Everything we know about tables will change!

Me: You’ve already said that.

You: Change!

Me: What a table is has not changed. How we make tables has not changed. How we use them has not changed. The change in this particular table has not changed very much. So little in fact you cannot demonstrate anything has changed. 

You: You obviously don’t understand  

Me: Yep, I clearly have learned nothing from this exchange.

—Jaylemurph 

 

Thanks your right I don't  understand.

i am done with thread.

Edited by Manwon Lender

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Mellon Man
Posted (edited)

It is a game changer and will rewrite history. 

This is the first evidence which demonstrates Judea was not uninhabited during this period, as previously thought. This is not just a small site, but a large complex one. To sustain such a large population, varied economic means much have existed, which is also significant. 

Ali in all, this site is an important discovery and will help with tremendously Neolithic Revolution research. 

Edited by Mellon Man
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jaylemurph
Posted (edited)
On July 31, 2019 at 2:51 AM, Mellon Man said:

It is a game changer and will rewrite history. 

This is the first evidence which demonstrates Judea was not uninhabited during this period, as previously thought. This is not just a small site, but a large complex one. To sustain such a large population, varied economic means much have existed, which is also significant. 

Ali in all, this site is an important discovery and will help with tremendously Neolithic Revolution research. 

I'm not saying it isn't an important discovery. I jut wanted to know what specifically it would change, and your post provides some of that, which I appreciate. 

--Jaylemurph 

Edited by jaylemurph

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