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Still Waters

Loch Ness skipper captures 25ft image on sonar

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ScotDeerie

115' is very, very deep. Lots of pressure. Little oxygen for a creature that surfaces and is able to breath air according to legend. This doesn't make much sense.

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Earl.Of.Trumps
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ScotDeerie said:

115' is very, very deep. Lots of pressure. Little oxygen for a creature that surfaces and is able to breath air according to legend. This doesn't make much sense.

Whales are known to dive down to 10,00 feet. It's possible. Whale dive

The new records indicate behavior that is much more varied and extreme than scientists expected for this species, says Simone Baumann-Pickering, a marine mammal biologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. One exceptional whale dove to 9,816 feet (2,992 meters), while a second stayed down for 138 minutes.

Edited by Earl.Of.Trumps
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ScotDeerie
1 minute ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

Whales are known to dive down to 1000 feet. It's possible. 

Whales, yes, because their body size is capable of withstanding the pressure, something smaller would feel greater pressure at a lesser level.  It's also quick.  They're not actually existing down there.

 

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Trelane
On ‎8‎/‎6‎/‎2019 at 9:20 AM, RoofGardener said:

Could be a shoal of fish. 

Could be a thermocline. 

(I'm an expert on sonar. I've watched The Hunt For Red October three times !)

 

One ping only...

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RoofGardener
1 hour ago, Trelane said:

One ping only...

.. but.. Captain ? 

"One ping... only"

Brilliant ! 

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Jon the frog
On 8/6/2019 at 3:34 PM, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

1960's…? yikes.

More so because within 27 years of discovery by Europeans in 1741, it was hunted into extinction for its meat, fat, and hide...

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MrBene

I am not familiar with the tech, does a school of fish look like that on a sonar?

 

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kapow53

This guy is looking to increase business.

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darkmoonlady

Off to watch the episode about a lake monster on the X Files, Quagmire. 

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the13bats
23 minutes ago, darkmoonlady said:

Off to watch the episode about a lake monster on the X Files, Quagmire. 

one of my favs is that flukeman episode.

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ScotDeerie
15 hours ago, MrBene said:

I am not familiar with the tech, does a school of fish look like that on a sonar?

 

On the one we had, it looked like a lot of fish. No high-tech equipment for us -- lotsa fish looked like lotsa fish.

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ScotDeerie
On 8/5/2019 at 12:19 PM, Robotic Jew said:

I've seen logs move.

So have I. Sort of. Snorkeling in the Niagara River (USA) one time, I saw a very large log on the bottom below me in 25' of water. All of a sudden it took off -- FAST. Scared the living **** out of me.  It was a sturgeon. They are making a comeback in this area and can be VERY large.  A 16' one surfaced in Lake Erie not long ago as it was dying.  (That one was somewhat bigger than average but, still, not a log and damn scary when it's under you.)

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Robotic Jew
9 minutes ago, ScotDeerie said:

So have I. Sort of. Snorkeling in the Niagara River (USA) one time, I saw a very large log on the bottom below me in 25' of water. All of a sudden it took off -- FAST. Scared the living **** out of me.  It was a sturgeon. They are making a comeback in this area and can be VERY large.  A 16' one surfaced in Lake Erie not long ago as it was dying.  (That one was somewhat bigger than average but, still, not a log and damn scary when it's under you.)

Well I was drunk when I saw it happen. VERY drunk.

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ScotDeerie
2 minutes ago, Robotic Jew said:

Well I was drunk when I saw it happen. VERY drunk.

I wasn't. Not that time, at least. Since I'm familiar with how many corpses get plucked out of that river every year I try not to mix drinking into the snorkeling.  On land, however, I may have mixed alcohol with moving log sightings on occasion... but I was too drunk to remember.

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stereologist
On 8/5/2019 at 6:26 PM, papageorge1 said:

First it looks more like a plesiosaur than a whale. Whales in fresh water? Apparently entering the loch from the open ocean is possible but limited particularly for a large animal. Also someone I respect with psychic insight says it is more like a cousin species of the plesiosaur.

I don't claim to know with certainty.

You ask whales in fresh water and then say plesiosaur. Guess you know nothing about plesiosaurs.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plesiosauria

There is an important word there, 'marine'. That means in salt water, not fresh water.

I guess when you rely on some psychic nonsense then you will get the fiction from someone that has no idea that plesiosaurs have been extinct for 66 million years and lived in marine environments.

I don't think it is a whale. Whales and the extinct plesiosaurs are air breathing and would be spotted as they regularly return to the surface to breath. No dead animals have washed up on shore - ever.

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papageorge1
5 hours ago, stereologist said:

You ask whales in fresh water and then say plesiosaur. Guess you know nothing about plesiosaurs.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plesiosauria

There is an important word there, 'marine'. That means in salt water, not fresh water.

I guess when you rely on some psychic nonsense then you will get the fiction from someone that has no idea that plesiosaurs have been extinct for 66 million years and lived in marine environments.

I don't think it is a whale. Whales and the extinct plesiosaurs are air breathing and would be spotted as they regularly return to the surface to breath. No dead animals have washed up on shore - ever.

If you really looked I said 'cousin species' of the Plesiosaur. Ever heard of fresh water river dolphins in South America for example? 

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stereologist
24 minutes ago, papageorge1 said:

If you really looked I said 'cousin species' of the Plesiosaur. Ever heard of fresh water river dolphins in South America for example? 

I've seen fresh water dolphins in Asia and South America. Of course, I am well aware of dolphins in fresh water.

Let's go back and take a look at what you wrote.

You wrote "Whales in fresh water? " Here is a hint. A dolphin is a whale.

All large marine reptiles died off by the end of the Cretaceous. The evolutionary line went dead 66Mya. You got this idea from some psychic kook who probably has no idea that happened. These folks are story tellers and don't understand reality and probably don't care.

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Carnoferox
On 8/5/2019 at 4:26 PM, papageorge1 said:

First it looks more like a plesiosaur than a whale. Whales in fresh water? Apparently entering the loch from the open ocean is possible but limited particularly for a large animal. Also someone I respect with psychic insight says it is more like a cousin species of the plesiosaur.

I don't claim to know with certainty.

Psychic paleontology is my favorite field of study. :lol:

You might want to do some research on actual plesiosaurs before making claims with such certainty.

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papageorge1
Just now, Carnoferox said:

Psychic paleontology is my favorite field of study. :lol:

You might want to do some research on actual plesiosaurs before making claims with such certainty.

You might first need to show where I have said anything here with 'such certainty'. I do though have 'such certainty' that my friends here will exaggerate anything I say if it helps their case.

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Carnoferox
1 minute ago, papageorge1 said:

You might first need to show where I have said anything here with 'such certainty'. I do though have 'such certainty' that my friends here will exaggerate anything I say if it helps their case.

Well you continue to support this assertion without any evidence, which I think takes a fair amount of certainty. 

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Jon the frog
On 8/7/2019 at 8:54 PM, MrBene said:

I am not familiar with the tech, does a school of fish look like that on a sonar?

 

Bigfoot in scuba gear too!

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SD455GTO

I still say Steller's Sea Cow, Northern climates, first sighted in the Aleutians, it all adds up. Northern climes go all around the polar circle. We have polar bears in Canada (in Churchill, Polar Bear capital of the world) just as much as others have polar bears in Russia correct? It makes sense that if there was something still sticking around in the world it just might find itself searching a nice place like a nice little warm spot such as Loch Ness etc to live.

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Matt221

Big old school of fish,but just maybe ......

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Earl.Of.Trumps
2 hours ago, Matt221 said:

Big old school of fish,but just maybe ......

I'm similarly thought, "but"...  And I have my reservations because of what I already stated in an earlier post that no one had comment on.

If you use the meters scale on the side of the sonar screen, that long mass seems to be 20 meters or 65 feet long. Skipper says "10 to 25 feet" 

So begets the question, do known fish in the loch have schools of such size?

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