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Still Waters

Colourized footage of the last Tasmania Tiger

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Still Waters

Colourised footage of the last known Tasmanian tiger has emerged online, allowing a rare glimpse at how the animal looked before it became extinct.

The animal officially became extinct in Australia when the last known member of the species - named Benjamin - died at Hobart Zoo in 1936.

Benjamin was filmed walking through his enclosure at the zoo by biologist David Fleay in 1933.

The historic footage has since been colourised and was shared to Reddit on Wednesday.  

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7335179/Incredible-footage-emerges-known-Tasmanian-tiger.html

https://www.reddit.com/r/australia/comments/cn2mhb/colourized_footage_of_the_last_known_tasmanian/

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'Walt' E. Kurtz

Some people clame that they have spotted them after they became extinct. 

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Orphalesion
34 minutes ago, Impedancer said:

Some people clame that they have spotted them after they became extinct. 

Those supposed sightings usually, unfortunately, later turn out to be mangy foxes or dingos :-(

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the13bats
45 minutes ago, Impedancer said:

Some people clame that they have spotted them after they became extinct. 

to me its possible they did last a while even possible a few remain but then i start thinking breeding numbers needed and realize its super unlikely

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Iilaa'mpuul'xem
22 minutes ago, Piney said:

It's actually saddening to watch. :hmm:

Agreed, it was sad to see that footage in black and white never mind bringing it to life in colour. :(

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Earl.Of.Trumps
2 hours ago, Impedancer said:

Some people clame that they have spotted them after they became extinct. 

I wouldn't be surprised. Look how long ago they said the panther went extinct in N.Carolina - and again,, in some central US states. NOw they are seeing them. Where I live, the wild turkey was thought to be extinct. Now they are a booming breed again. 

People are under the silly impression that if humans don't find them, they can't exist. 

 

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Brassboy86

Earl.Of.Trumps, you're so very right. I live in Western North Carolina and two years ago I did indeed see a black panther just on the other side of my back yard's fence-gate, which is chain link and doesn't hide much. I saw it plainly, clearly and it watched me with those neon green/yellow eyes for what seemed like minutes. When it realized I was watching back, it backed away, turned into the bush and disappeared. There is no mistake or alternate explanation, you know a panther when you see one and this one was easily 80-100lbs of glistening power packed muscle, claws and teeth. It stood almost two feet tall, was about a foot wide and around four feet long not including the tail. The tail I saw the least of, as the animal turned to return to obscurity, it flicked it's thick tail in the air before disappearing. That's something I won't be forgetting any time soon. I think the Tasmanian Tiger is no different, I believe there is a pocket population somewhere down there

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Piney
4 hours ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

I wouldn't be surprised. Look how long ago they said the panther went extinct in N.Carolina - and again,, in some central US states. NOw they are seeing them. Where I live, the wild turkey was thought to be extinct. Now they are a booming breed again. 

They were re-introduced. I helped with the turkeys and was told about the panthers.

 

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Earl.Of.Trumps
3 hours ago, Carnoferox said:

A population of still-living animals moving into a different area is not comparable to a population of extinct animals suddenly re-appearing.

True that!  Here is a link that shows animals (12) thought to once be extinct  Link 12 erstwhile extinct animals

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Earl.Of.Trumps
1 hour ago, Piney said:

They were re-introduced. I helped with the turkeys and was told about the panthers.

 

you helped reintroduce turkeys in Massachusetts? you're a NJ devil, though. I don't think they were introduced here, they just showed up. And what pests!! Don't feed them, you'll never get rid of them LOL

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Piney
Just now, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

you helped reintroduce turkeys in Massachusetts? you're a NJ devil, though. I don't think they were introduced here, they just showed up. And what pests!! Don't feed them, you'll never get rid of them LOL

Parks and Forestry let them go from Maryland to Maine. We even tossed some into Central Park for a chuckle and a reaction.

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Jon the frog

A strange looking beast with thin and long jaws.

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Vox
9 hours ago, Orphalesion said:

Those supposed sightings usually, unfortunately, later turn out to be mangy foxes or dingos :-(

You never know, you’d be surprised how resilient animal species are.  In 2005 it was thought that there were only 80 Iberian Lynxes left in the world.  They are now bouncing back (albeit with the help of scientists) and the number of Iberian Lynxes stand at nearly 700 in 2019. 

My point is, the bounce back is real and in a continent as vast as Australia, potentially there could be pockets of Thylacines that are evading human presence.  

Here’s hoping anyhow.

 

 

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Orphalesion
1 minute ago, Vox said:

You never know, you’d be surprised how resilient animal species are.  In 2005 it was thought that there were only 80 Iberian Lynxes left in the world.  They are now bouncing back (albeit with the help of scientists) and the number of Iberian Lynxes stand at nearly 700 in 2019. 

My point is, the bounce back is real and in a continent as vast as Australia, potentially there could be pockets of Thylacines that are evading human presence.  

Here’s hoping anyhow.

 

 

But you'd think by now one would have at least been caught on a fence somewhere, or run over by a car, etc. It's been over 80 years.

 

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Don Caesar

Interesting footage. The same vintage as King Kong (1933).

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DirtyDocMartens
8 hours ago, Brassboy86 said:

 I think the Tasmanian Tiger is no different, I believe there is a pocket population somewhere down there

Why do you think that?

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Myles
5 hours ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

True that!  Here is a link that shows animals (12) thought to once be extinct  Link 12 erstwhile extinct animals

Take a look at your link and you will see the issue.

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openozy
12 hours ago, Iilaa'mpuul'xem said:

Agreed, it was sad to see that footage in black and white never mind bringing it to life in colour. :(

I think it was needed to highlight and bring closer to home that this was a real and awesome Aussie animal.The mentality of the early famers here hasn't changed much with the Gov giving farmers the right to kill every roo on sight with the drought here.Sheep are so much more important than native wildlife $.

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Captain Risky

Why do they call it a tiger when its obviously got more in common with a dog? 

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Seti42
Posted (edited)

Chupacabra confirmed.

I agree with previous posts, though...Seriously, seeing that footage in color makes it more 'immediate' and sad than the B&W footage did.

 

 

Edited by Seti42

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Unfortunately
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Captain Risky said:

Why do they call it a tiger when its obviously got more in common with a dog? 

The thylacine had distinct black stripes on its back and flanks that led to the whole 'tiger' outlook I believe. I'm not sure about its genealogy in regards to dogs. ^_^

Edit:

Here's a better picture of the stripes.

Edited by Unfortunately
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openozy

Closer to a carnivorous roo.

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Piney
9 hours ago, Unfortunately said:

 I'm not sure about its genealogy in regards to dogs. ^_^

None whatsoever. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thylacine

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