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Large eel-like creature filmed in River Ness

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Captain Risky
49 minutes ago, Gwynbleidd said:

It looks very long and skinny - as the article said it's hard to measure how big it really is, also we don't have the measurements for that fish in the foreground.  Does anyone know what sort of fish that is and if it's fully grown or not  Just out of curiosity. ;) 

DieChecker recons its a salmon. 

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Gwynbleidd
1 minute ago, Captain Risky said:

DieChecker recons its a salmon. 

Ooh thanks Risky.  I must've totally skipped over DieChecker's reply doh - sorry DieChecker LOL

I'm not much of a fisherperson, I thought salmon was saltwater.  Actually I'm probably thinking of tuna :wacko:

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Captain Risky
3 minutes ago, Gwynbleidd said:

Ooh thanks Risky.  I must've totally skipped over DieChecker's reply doh - sorry DieChecker LOL

I'm not much of a fisherperson, I thought salmon was saltwater.  Actually I'm probably thinking of tuna :wacko:

I think they spawn in freshwater and their young go back into the sea and then come back to the same place to repeat the process? Im sure one of our North American friends wouldn't mind adding to that. 

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Captain Risky
7 hours ago, openozy said:

Eels taste really good smoked,so do mullet which tastes bad to me normally cooked.

 

Carp taste like mud but my Italian mate cooks them with sauce and they are great.

Carp needs to be de-mudded in fresh running water for several days to remove that taste. The bones would make any eating experience tedious and time consuming. 

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openozy
1 hour ago, Captain Risky said:

Carp needs to be de-mudded in fresh running water for several days to remove that taste. The bones would make any eating experience tedious and time consuming. 

I think they pressure cook them so the bones are edible.

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DieChecker
2 hours ago, Gwynbleidd said:

Ooh thanks Risky.  I must've totally skipped over DieChecker's reply doh - sorry DieChecker LOL

I'm not much of a fisherperson, I thought salmon was saltwater.  Actually I'm probably thinking of tuna :wacko:

It said salmon in the article...

Quote

In the video, a salmon can be seen swimming around in the foreground while the eel (or whatever it is) can be seen passing from left to right in the background, barely visible against the gloom.

I dont know much about European salmon, but in general salmon spawn in fresh water and return to the sea while still small. So that's likely a adult returning upstream. Not sure the size of a salmon from Scotland. 

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Iilaa'mpuul'xem
4 hours ago, Captain Risky said:

DieChecker recons its a salmon. 

I would say Brown Trout. 

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Iilaa'mpuul'xem
1 hour ago, DieChecker said:

It said salmon in the article...

I read too, I know it was a the Ness District salmon and fisheries board that posted the footage but it looks like a Brown Trout to me? 

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DieChecker

I did a search on Scottish salmon and the color is about right, and the fins seem to be in about the right places. 

The salmon seem to have more fade in their coloring, and the trout more readily distinct spots. Though some also appear very close to this fish.

Also I was looking at the river bed rocks, but those could be just as size variable as the fish.

The eel does appear, IMHO, to be at least as thick as the fish though.

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Iilaa'mpuul'xem
11 minutes ago, DieChecker said:

I did a search on Scottish salmon and the color is about right, and the fins seem to be in about the right places. 

The salmon seem to have more fade in their coloring, and the trout more readily distinct spots. Though some also appear very close to this fish.

Also I was looking at the river bed rocks, but those could be just as size variable as the fish.

The eel does appear, IMHO, to be at least as thick as the fish though.

I am basing it on the markings and jaw line... 

 

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DieChecker

Perhaps, but considering the source of the video is the Ness Salmon Fishery Board, and they're the ones calling it a salmon.... ?

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Matt221
12 hours ago, openozy said:

Eels taste really good smoked,so do mullet which tastes bad to me normally cooked.

 

Carp taste like mud but my Italian mate cooks them with sauce and they are great.

My dad used to eat carp he would purge the fist in an old cattle troff changing the water about 3 times he reckoned them was nice.....I didn't ever try so I don't know,also Eels cut into about inch long bits and fried in garlic butter ment to be nice

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Tatetopa
21 hours ago, CloudSix said:

Is it allowed to catch eels, do they have a hunting season?

Anyone recall that old Scottish ballad about Lord Randall who was poisoned by his wife on a dish of eels?  Chalk up at least one fatality to the deadly loch eels.

"Oh where ha'e ye been, Lord Randall, my son!
And where ha'e ye been, my handsome young man!
"
"I ha'e been to the wild wood: mother, make my bed soon,
For I'm wearied wi' hunting, and fain wald lie down."

"An wha met ye there, Lord Randall, my son?
An wha met you there, my handsome young man?"
"I dined wi my true-love; mother, make my bed soon,
For I'm wearied wi hunting, and fain wad lie doon."

"And what did she give you, Lord Randall, my son?
And what did she give you, my handsome young man?"
"Eels fried in broo; mother, make my bed soon,
For I'm wearied wi hunting, and fain wad lie doon."

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Tatetopa

Here in the Pacific Northwest  our own pacific salmon (different from the Atlantic type) swim upriver to spawn and die.  Steelhead trout can make the journey back and forth more than once, and they get pretty big.

Along with salmon come smelt, oily little fish that some love to eat fried, and lamprey.  A lamprey looks like an eel in body shape, but it is a far more primitive fish.  It has a conical mouth filled with teeth that is uses to attach to fish and chew into them.  The Indians who live along the Colombia historically trap them at the falls and smoke them  They only get about 2 feet long or a little more..  

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Iilaa'mpuul'xem
12 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

Here in the Pacific Northwest  our own pacific salmon (different from the Atlantic type) swim upriver to spawn and die.  Steelhead trout can make the journey back and forth more than once, and they get pretty big.

Along with salmon come smelt, oily little fish that some love to eat fried, and lamprey.  A lamprey looks like an eel in body shape, but it is a far more primitive fish.  It has a conical mouth filled with teeth that is uses to attach to fish and chew into them.  The Indians who live along the Colombia historically trap them at the falls and smoke them  They only get about 2 feet long or a little more..  

Lamprey, ugly, scary, alien monsters, I would hate to have them lock on me... 

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stereologist

I watched the video several times and I don't really see the eel swimming. It seems to be drifting by using the current for propulsion.

 

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Captain Risky
6 hours ago, openozy said:

I think they pressure cook them so the bones are edible.

Okay never heard of that before. Very cleaver Italians.

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Captain Risky
1 hour ago, stereologist said:

I've seen some shows which suggest that Nessie might be a gigantic larval eel. In the following link there is a discussion of a large larval eel found in the 1930s and the new interpretation today.

https://www.micahhanks.com/science/leave-the-leptocephalus-alone-a-case-of-mistaken-identity/

 

Surprise surprise stereo. See. Where’s smoke there’s usually fire.

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stereologist
38 minutes ago, Captain Risky said:

Surprise surprise stereo. See. Where’s smoke there’s usually fire.

Although there are eels where the gigantic larval eels? Did you read the link? It turns out that the supposed eel scaled up from the larval one found does not apply to the species that was found after that date.

Please do check it out. The hunt for gigantic larval eels in Loch Ness has always been a bust. The one and only large larval eel ever found was in the Southern Hemisphere in a marine environment. Is there smoke anywhere? No. 

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Captain Risky
4 minutes ago, stereologist said:

Although there are eels where the gigantic larval eels? Did you read the link? It turns out that the supposed eel scaled up from the larval one found does not apply to the species that was found after that date.

Please do check it out. The hunt for gigantic larval eels in Loch Ness has always been a bust. The one and only large larval eel ever found was in the Southern Hemisphere in a marine environment. Is there smoke anywhere? No. 

Why time will tell. Hundreds if not thousands of people have seen something weird. Scientists have take. DNA samples of the water. Underwater and above ground cameras will sooner or latter get to the bottom (pun intended). It’s only a matter of time. 

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stereologist
3 minutes ago, Captain Risky said:

Why time will tell. Hundreds if not thousands of people have seen something weird. Scientists have take. DNA samples of the water. Underwater and above ground cameras will sooner or latter get to the bottom (pun intended). It’s only a matter of time. 

That's been said for hundreds of years. Just because someone does not know what they are viewing does not mean that what they are seeing is unusual. Cameras do not work in the Loch due to the dark water. How long do you want to wait? Should we wait another century?

DNA simply tells us lots of eels. But fishermen already knew there were eels there. Guess you didn't read the link about the larval eel.

Edited by stereologist

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Twas Brillig
On 9/4/2019 at 2:27 PM, Iilaa'mpuul'xem said:

 disgusting creatures and taste like crap, when you eventually chew through the rubber... 

Amazing ignorance on this thread.  The fresh water living congers are appreciated for their tender and delicious variety of Sushi. Obviously you've never had UNAGI sushi, one of the most sought after species of fish is the FRESH WATER conger eel (Salt Water version is known as ANAGO and is a bit less tender). Conger eels are freakin delicious cooked correctly, it's one of my absolute fav. dishes. 

Related imageImage result for conger eel

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Iilaa'mpuul'xem
1 hour ago, Twas Brillig said:

Amazing ignorance on this thread.  The fresh water living congers are appreciated for their tender and delicious variety of Sushi. Obviously you've never had UNAGI sushi, one of the most sought after species of fish is the FRESH WATER conger eel (Salt Water version is known as ANAGO and is a bit less tender). Conger eels are freakin delicious cooked correctly, it's one of my absolute fav. dishes. 

Related imageImage result for conger eel

Disgusting and the salt water ones are like rubber bands. By the way, there is nothing ignorant about personal taste.

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stereologist

I would like to expand on my comment to Captain Risky. I was in a rush and did not express some important considerations.

19 hours ago, Captain Risky said:

Surprise surprise stereo. See. Where’s smoke there’s usually fire.

There have  been cases where all sorts of things have been proposed and what is almost always lacking is any evidence. What we have here is evidence that there might be some long creature in the lake area. This was not in the Loch itself but in the waters that connect the loch to the sea. It is suggestive of something, but the existence of eels in the lake was well known.

There are some that might say that skeptics are wrong. That isn't really rue. As has been repeatedly pointed out, plesiosaurs are extinct and have been extinct for a long time. You might wonder how eDNA excluded something for which there is no known DNA. That would be a good question to research since it is at the heart of how eDNA operates. Sharks were excluded as well. Someone might propose that it might be a new and unknown species of shark. The same reason eDNA excludes plesiosaurs applies here as well.

Turns out skeptics have been right all along since they have applied logic and reason to the known evidence. It certainly has taken them a long way hasn't it. Now logic and reason can be applied to the eel concept. Are there large eels in the loch?  Eels is not the question but are there gigantic eels and do eels have the habits or ability to perform the situations people report? I'll let you propose some ideas along those lines.

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