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OverSword

First Cherokee representative to congress

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OverSword
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The Cherokee Nation has named its first delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives. Former Obama appointee Kimberly Teehee's nomination was approved by the tribe's council on Thursday. Although the treaty that created this nonvoting position is almost 200 years old, it had never been filled.

The article outlining the right to a delegate is in the Treaty of New Echota. The 1835 treaty is also the document that led to the Trail of Tears, something that has been top of mind for Teehee. She points out the treaty gave up the Cherokee's homelands and cost the tribe thousands of lives.

"Literally blood, sweat and tears," Teehee said. "We can't ignore that history and what it meant for us to have a provision like that put in place given the devastation that occurred and the deaths that occurred."

 

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OverSword

What I find confusing is that they've had the right for a representative since 1835 and haven't exercised that right until now. :blink:

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aztek

maybe there was something else that prevented them from doing it. i'm sure if it was that easy they would have

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Not A Rockstar
40 minutes ago, OverSword said:

What I find confusing is that they've had the right for a representative since 1835 and haven't exercised that right until now. :blink:

They get a non-voting position and the Trail of Tears... I think people do not comprehend the anguish and loss that ordeal and betrayal was, just one amid the takeover and robbery of the Native American's land by invaders. I do not find it odd at all that it has taken this long for the raw bitterness to fade enough to even consider filling the slot. It is rather like Nazi Germany offering the Jews a non voting seat while the gas chambers and camps were still going on  No, it is not an exaggeration. Ask any Nez Perce today. 

It is almost offensive to think about and should at the very least get a vote IMO. I hope it can be used for a really loud voice and platform for Natives, if nothing else.

 

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OverSword
6 minutes ago, Not A Rockstar said:

They get a non-voting position and the Trail of Tears... I think people do not comprehend the anguish and loss that ordeal and betrayal was, just one amid the takeover and robbery of the Native American's land by invaders. I do not find it odd at all that it has taken this long for the raw bitterness to fade enough to even consider filling the slot. It is rather like Nazi Germany offering the Jews a non voting seat while the gas chambers and camps were still going on  No, it is not an exaggeration. Ask any Nez Perce today. 

It is almost offensive to think about and should at the very least get a vote IMO. I hope it can be used for a really loud voice and platform for Natives, if nothing else.

 

Cherokee and all other citizens of a state have the opportunity to elect a representative in a voting position.  Indeed there is a Cherokee representative from Oklahoma.  There are other entities that have non-voting representation such as Washington DC and Puerto Rico.  I can see why they may have considered it a waste of time in 1835 but I'm really surprised that nobody in a position of authority in the Cherokee nation hasn't thought this could be a useful position before now.

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Desertrat56

Right now we have 2 native american women in Congress who have voting rights, Deb Halland of New Mexico & Sharice Davids of Kansas.  They are not the first native americans to be elected to offices.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Native_Americans_in_the_United_States_Congress

It is interesting that someone has taken the position from the treaty, but will it make any difference?

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