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Still Waters

New pterosaur found hiding in plain sight

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Hankenhunter

Well dang. I should have read the title better. I was expecting a frozen dinosaur that a melting glacier spit out. Now I has a disappoint. :huh: Still a cool article though.

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Ell

It kinda looks like a flightless cormorant. Considering its weight, I suppose that it was a salt-water animal? I do not think that it was a plankton feeder. I wonder what kind of fish it ate?

Edited by Ell
replaced bird by animal

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It's Just An Opinion

Danger Squawk

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It's Just An Opinion

I weigh like 89 pounds i bet i could ride it into battle.
That face is so cute, I wouldn't know whether to run or pet it.

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It's Just An Opinion

Argentavis magnificens

Had a wingspan of about 24 or 16 feet. and it's said that it couldn't fly and only glided.

They said that it's wings being to heavy for takeoff. It could only "fly" by jumping off a height or being assited by strong wind currents. and it weighed only 159pounds. 

So how come this thing could fly, having a wingspan of 33feet and a weight of 250kg? 

I thought i red somewhere that there were these scientific calculations made that stated that anything above a certain weight limit simply would not be able to take off on its own because the wingspan sufficient required for takeoff would transcend the limits that the gravitational pull would allow. in other words the wings would add too much weight for it to take off. so I was under the impression that flying animals could only ever evolved to a certain size and weight limit because of earths gravity. 

Am i wrong? Or on this post were they using the word "flying" interchangeably with gliding? 

8888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888

 I want a mechanical glider that folds and is deployable at anytime. That would be awesome. 

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It's Just An Opinion

Ok I've visited some sites and saw the calculations. I would need a wingspan of 8 feet. Closer to over 4 feet on each side since the rig would have to be hanging over the back and add enough lengths to start the 4 feet per wing past the point where my body would be causing disturbance to the aerodynamics of it. So 9 foot wing span give or take if the rig is 1 foot. 

That's a wingspan that could be flapped without being smashed into the ground, and it's foldable and walk-able with my height. 

EVERY DAY IS ARM DAY XD

No but seriously I'm within the weigh class that I could actually fly if I had wings. :C I want wings.

Edited by It's Just An Opinion
auto-corrected.

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Hankenhunter
50 minutes ago, It's Just An Opinion said:

Argentavis magnificens

Had a wingspan of about 24 or 16 feet. and it's said that it couldn't fly and only glided.

They said that it's wings being to heavy for takeoff. It could only "fly" by jumping off a height or being assited by strong wind currents. and it weighed only 159pounds. 

So how come this thing could fly, having a wingspan of 33feet and a weight of 250kg? 

I thought i red somewhere that there were these scientific calculations made that stated that anything above a certain weight limit simply would not be able to take off on its own because the wingspan sufficient required for takeoff would transcend the limits that the gravitational pull would allow. in other words the wings would add too much weight for it to take off. so I was under the impression that flying animals could only ever evolved to a certain size and weight limit because of earths gravity. 

Am i wrong? Or on this post were they using the word "flying" interchangeably with gliding? 

8888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888

 I want a mechanical glider that folds and is deployable at anytime. That would be awesome. 

Probably, like most birds today, these fliers had thin light weight bones to assist flight. They were probably fish eaters that scooped as they swooped.

Edited by Hankenhunter
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It's Just An Opinion

Two small jet engines would totally take me off, and after seeing that tiny UFO replica I know two small jet engines are in fact something that can already be made. https://mikeshouts.com/adifo-ufo-style-vtol-drone/

So yeh, I fall within the weight class required for the calculations, and all the technology required to make it happen already exists.

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kobolds

Frozen dragon NOT EQUAL frozen bones

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zygote_myles

Wow, that's one amazing animal. One amazing reptile. 

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jowasmus

I always get confused when I see new species of dinosaurs & the images that go with them. I've lived long enough that they had scales, then feathers, & who knows what colors? Some artists need to be tapped to make more than a single representation of the species. I need some variations. LOL

This was a cool article, though. :yes:

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It's Just An Opinion

It might also have to do with the atmosphere and the amount of co2 ppm to air. This pterodactyl was alive long before the Argentavis magnificens and there were alot of changes happening to the atmosphere, there still are. I was like 6 so i don't might not remember correctly but when watching the history channel or animal planet whatever it was i remember seeing this prehistoric tarantula that was larger than a persons chest. and if my memory serves me right they said tarantulas cant get that big anymore because their chest cavity somehow doesn't compensate for the difference in the atmosphere now as to how it was back then. SO I'm assuming that perhaps it was easier for heavier things to fly on the time of that pterodactyl compared to when the Argentavis magnificens was alive. and of course now the atmosphere is even worse so thatll have an effect on many other flying species making them get smaller and forcing the largest ones to lose flight and evolve to survive on the ground or die. You can thank the dark sith lord looking ass Brazilian president for that if it does happen. 

but hey the good thing about nature is that it's always adapting and evolving. The problem is that human society doesn't change (well it does but you know what i mean) Nature survived 5 mass extinction events so far, It can survive another one, but it doesn't have to. It's never to late to change.  If people change, nature will easily make a comeback and restore the atmosphere and everything else.

 

Edited by It's Just An Opinion
no reason, correcting my wording.
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Carnoferox
On 9/16/2019 at 5:10 PM, Ell said:

It kinda looks like a flightless cormorant. Considering its weight, I suppose that it was a salt-water animal? I do not think that it was a plankton feeder. I wonder what kind of fish it ate?

Azhdarchid pterosaurs like Cryodrakon are considered terrestrial stalkers analogous to modern hornbills and marabou storks, not filter-feeders or piscivores.

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/were-azhdarchid-pterosaurs-really-terrestrial-stalkers-the-evidence-says-yes-yes-they-probably-were/

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Carnoferox
15 hours ago, It's Just An Opinion said:

It might also have to do with the atmosphere and the amount of co2 ppm to air. This pterodactyl was alive long before the Argentavis magnificens and there were alot of changes happening to the atmosphere, there still are. I was like 6 so i don't might not remember correctly but when watching the history channel or animal planet whatever it was i remember seeing this prehistoric tarantula that was larger than a persons chest. and if my memory serves me right they said tarantulas cant get that big anymore because their chest cavity somehow doesn't compensate for the difference in the atmosphere now as to how it was back then. SO I'm assuming that perhaps it was easier for heavier things to fly on the time of that pterodactyl compared to when the Argentavis magnificens was alive. and of course now the atmosphere is even worse so thatll have an effect on many other flying species making them get smaller and forcing the largest ones to lose flight and evolve to survive on the ground or die. You can thank the dark sith lord looking ass Brazilian president for that if it does happen. 

but hey the good thing about nature is that it's always adapting and evolving. The problem is that human society doesn't change (well it does but you know what i mean) Nature survived 5 mass extinction events so far, It can survive another one, but it doesn't have to. It's never to late to change.  If people change, nature will easily make a comeback and restore the atmosphere and everything else.

 

Pterosaurs being able to fly had nothing to do with different atmospheric conditions, but rather their skeletal adaptations. Their bones were pneumatized, filled with air sacs, which not only reduced weight but also assisted in respiration.

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It's Just An Opinion
17 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

Pterosaurs being able to fly had nothing to do with different atmospheric conditions, but rather their skeletal adaptations. Their bones were pneumatized, filled with air sacs, which not only reduced weight but also assisted in respiration.

That's really cool. 

Believe it or not I have 8 to 12mm wide veins bulging the surface of my skin all over my body. Not Just a few, all over like vines less than 2 inches apart wrapping around all over the place.

That's probably why I can float parallel to the surface of the water in a pool filled with nothing but regular chlorinated water, (without moving at all) The same way I've seen those people in extremely salty lakes do.

O and I mean float paralleled not partially sinking, my feet are leveled with my head as if i were laying on a bed. 

Edited by It's Just An Opinion

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Ell
9 hours ago, Carnoferox said:

Azhdarchid pterosaurs like Cryodrakon are considered terrestrial stalkers analogous to modern hornbills and marabou storks, not filter-feeders or piscivores.

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/were-azhdarchid-pterosaurs-really-terrestrial-stalkers-the-evidence-says-yes-yes-they-probably-were/

Marine turtles can walk on land, but that doesn't mean that they are land animals.

Maybe the pterosaur species that was the ancestor of the birds could fly, but I doubt that any of the other pterosaur species could. If they could, they would all have evolved into bird-like animals. If they could fly in air, they would not have been vulnerable to mass extinctions. Whereas marine life, if I recall correctly, is extremely vulnerable to mass extinctions.

 

I suspect that most pterosaur species flew exclusively in water: i.e. they swam.

 

 

 

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Carnoferox
2 hours ago, Ell said:

Marine turtles can walk on land, but that doesn't mean that they are land animals.

Maybe the pterosaur species that was the ancestor of the birds could fly, but I doubt that any of the other pterosaur species could. If they could, they would all have evolved into bird-like animals. If they could fly in air, they would not have been vulnerable to mass extinctions. Whereas marine life, if I recall correctly, is extremely vulnerable to mass extinctions.

 

I suspect that most pterosaur species flew exclusively in water: i.e. they swam.

Wow there are a lot of misconceptions here.

1. Marine turtles can shuffle up onto the beach, but they can’t walk on land because their limbs are modified into flippers. They spend the majority of their lives in the ocean, only coming ashore to lay eggs. Not at all a good analogue for pterosaurs.

2. Pterosaurs were not the ancestors of birds.

3. All pterosaurs yet discovered were capable of flight, which has been proven by multiple biomechanical analyses. As I stated earlier, their pneumatized bones allowed them to remain lightweight enough even with massive wingspans.

4. Flying animals are just as vulnerable to mass extinctions as non-flying ones. Many groups of birds and all pterosaurs were wiped out during the K-Pg extinction despite being able to fly.

5. Only a few select groups of piscivorous pterosaurs (nyctosaurids, pteranodontids, and rhamphorhynchids) spent significant time in water. All of them were still capable of flight. The majority of other pterosaur families hunted terrestrial prey.

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