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Still Waters

Roman ‘pendants’ were women’s makeup tools

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Still Waters

In the early 20th century, archaeologists working at Wroxeter in England unearthed three small, copper-alloy trinkets dating back to the Roman era. The objects had loops that would have allowed them to be strung from a cord, so the excavators initially assumed they were decorative pendants. But as the BBC reports, this assessment appears to have been wrong; experts with English Heritage now believe that the Wroxeter “pendants” were in fact women’s makeup tools.

Cameron Moffett, a curator with English Heritage, discovered the error while taking a fresh look at the pieces, which had not been examined for many years.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/these-misidentified-roman-pendants-were-actually-womens-makeup-tools-180973184/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-shropshire-49728401?

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Cloud7

 

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skliss

Thanks! Really enjoyed the video!

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hetrodoxly

I find this quiet worrying, these are not rare finds for metal detectorists, i've never known anyone describe them as amulets we've dated them existing long before and during the Romano-British period and are generally known as woad grinders.

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Cloud7

 

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