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Still Waters

First ever labradoodle wasn't a designer dog

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Still Waters

Thirty years ago, Wally Conron was asked to breed a non-shedding guide dog. Looking back, he worries that he created a monster.

"I bred the labradoodle for a blind lady whose husband was allergic to dog hair," he says.

"Why people are breeding them today, I haven't got a clue."

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2019-09-23/labradoodle-guide-dogs-designer-regret/10717186

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Piney
17 minutes ago, Still Waters said:

"Why people are breeding them today, I haven't got a clue."

I never understood why someone would want to ruin a standard poodle with the stupidest American breed ever.

Standards in their own right are smart, beautiful and well mannered house and working dogs and I loved my grandmother's ones who I would take horseback riding with me. 

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freetoroam
Quote

"I bred the labradoodle for a blind lady whose husband was allergic to dog hair," he says.

"Why people are breeding them today, I haven't got a clue."

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2019-09-23/labradoodle-guide-dogs-designer-regret/10717186

I still do not think he had a right to 'experiment' himself.

If the husband was allegic to dog hair, then do not get a dog! Get a human to help you, there are enough of them.

Edited by freetoroam
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Desertrat56

My mother raised standard poodles for 50+ years and any time that she saw or heard about a doodle dog (labradoodle, golden doodle etc.) she would go into a rage.  She said it was careless and stupid.  I am wondering why poodles weren't offered up as a solution instead of trying to mix breeds.  Standard poodles are the smartest of the hunting dogs.  They can be trained to hunt in different ways, flushing, pointing, fetching etc. (can't run like a blood hound though); originally they were bred as water dogs, but they will do it all and they can be taught to herd and will look after children if they think people aren't taking care of them.  The problem with them is that if they don't have a job they get bored and if they aren't trained they will train you.  They do not shed.  The only thing I see stopping them from being guide dogs is that they have to be groomed at least every 6 weeks, which doesn't have to be a problem, just find a good groomer that will shave their hair off, then there is no brushing needed. 

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Piney
23 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

My mother raised standard poodles for 50+ years and any time that she saw or heard about a doodle dog (labradoodle, golden doodle etc.) she would go into a rage.  She said it was careless and stupid.  I am wondering why poodles weren't offered up as a solution instead of trying to mix breeds.  Standard poodles are the smartest of the hunting dogs.  They can be trained to hunt in different ways, flushing, pointing, fetching etc. (can't run like a blood hound though); originally they were bred as water dogs, but they will do it all and they can be taught to herd and will look after children if they think people aren't taking care of them.  The problem with them is that if they don't have a job they get bored and if they aren't trained they will train you.  They do not shed.  The only thing I see stopping them from being guide dogs is that they have to be groomed at least every 6 weeks, which doesn't have to be a problem, just find a good groomer that will shave their hair off, then there is no brushing needed. 

Since Mummums were farm and working dogs they were kept "hunt cut". One of them, Brandy could retrieve ducks and geese like nothing. 

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Desertrat56
24 minutes ago, Piney said:

Since Mummums were farm and working dogs they were kept "hunt cut". One of them, Brandy could retrieve ducks and geese like nothing. 

We had one that was a great mouser.  She was very serious about it as she knew my mom hated mice.  She also took care of us when we were very little, kept us together and let us dress her or put her in the wagon.  She also would ride the horse with my dad, though she didn't really like it, preferred to run behind.

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Piney
53 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

We had one that was a great mouser.  She was very serious about it as she knew my mom hated mice.  She also took care of us when we were very little, kept us together and let us dress her or put her in the wagon.  She also would ride the horse with my dad, though she didn't really like it, preferred to run behind.

After Gram died I inherited her ancient teacup. "Pockets". She use to ride on the spare battery tray of the 6600 and 4020 and went with my whenever I hauled horses or hay. 

She slept on top of my head. 

post-21137-1122166114.jpg

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Desertrat56

How sweet.  I inherited 3 from my mom, 2 standards and a toy that she used to show.  I am not used to small dogs, he is a bit high strung, but very sweet.  And he has good hearing, alerts me every time the neighbors go into their yards.  But he does let me know when the mail man has passed by too.

The other two, I kept one and gave the other to my nephew.  And I have one I rescued in 2011 when I still lived in Texas.

I can't get photos to load, I thought cropping them would help but it still says they are too big (data).

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