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Planet Nine could be a miniature black hole

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psyche101

Wouldn't there be a notable band empty of natural bodies in the Oort cloud? Or would it be to far away for us to make something like the out? 

Like the separations in Saturn's rings. 

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Imaginarynumber1
33 minutes ago, psyche101 said:

Wouldn't there be a notable band empty of natural bodies in the Oort cloud? Or would it be to far away for us to make something like the out? 

Like the separations in Saturn's rings. 

I mean, if it were a 10 earth mass black hole, it would have the same effect of a 10 earth mass planet, i.e., some of the effects that we've seen.

The authors don't really suspect it's a primordial blackhole, but rather are advocating for astronomers to be more creative in their searching. 

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Waspie_Dwarf
47 minutes ago, psyche101 said:

Wouldn't there be a notable band empty of natural bodies in the Oort cloud?

The hypothetical planet 9 has a (hypothetical) orbit which takes the planet as far out as 800 AU from the sun. The inner edge of the Oort cloud is 2000 AU from the sun, so planet 9 will not be sweeping areas of the Oort Cloud clear. Planet 9 is, however, within the Kuiper Belt and should clear areas within this belt. The problem is that we simply have not mapped the Kuiper belt well enough to see such cleared regions yet. There are, however, objects within the Kuiper Belt which have unusual orbits. These objects have orbits consistent with them having been cleared from their original orbit by an, as yet, unseen large object... Planet 9.

As Imaginarynumber1 said a 10 Earth mass black hole would have the same effect as a 10 Earth mass planet. The idea that black holes suck in everything due to their massive gravity is only partially right. At a sufficient distance from a black hole it's gravitational effects are no different from any other object of the same mass. Only if you get too close do you feel the famous black hole effects. If you pass a region known as the event horizon the escape velocity exceeds the speed of light and there is no escape. Stay further away than the event horizon and escape (or a stable orbit) is possible.

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psyche101

Thanks a million Imaginarynumber1 and Waspie_Dwarf :tu:

Well explained. I appreciate your time. 

Cheers. 

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Jon the frog

Between Greta speaking and the news of a black hole in our solar system, i will go drown myself in beer like we don't have a tomorrow.   

 

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imarobot

Maybe it's not a black hole, just a dark hole, i.e., a big chunk of dark matter. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iJsEdhFgzc

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josellama2000

It refers to a theoretical/primordial black hole which are highly dense but not massive as newer ones. It mass could be as smaller as the mass of a mountain, therefore its gravity is low.

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