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Mass extinction caused long-term disruption

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Jon the frog

Incredible that after such an heavy loss of genetic biodiversity, remnant species evolved to fill the gaps so fast. It's a enormous amount of time when looked at a human perspective level, but small when looked at an evolution process level and smaller at a geological level.

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Tom1200

I think we need to take this 'research' with a pinch of sodium chloride.  No proper scientist uses the word "whopping" except to refer to their genitalia.  Besides, I've read books and I reckon it only took 12.7 million years.  This new calculation is so far-fetched that it's absolutely ludicrous!

Also - did anyone else spot that 'Sarah Alvarez' turned into 'Samantha Gibbs' at the end?  Try proof-reading your fake science, creeps.

Finally - and this is the killer: there is no 'University of Gibraltar'!  Gib isn't big enough to house a university and I should know - I looked at a map for ages and couldn't even find it.  (I know it's near Mexico because they speak Spanish.)

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Hammerclaw

They analyzed a complete thirteen million year data set. That's pretty cut and dried. Biodiversity, after recovering from The Great Dying of the Permian, had been hit by subsequent lesser extinctions, but nothing like this. It took a long time for life to fully rehabilitate the oceans, a long time on the human scale, but a blink in geologic time.

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DanL

The lead author is Sarah Alvarez and the CO-lead author is Samantha Gibbs. That is how it reads. They are two different people, not one person that turned into another person.

The word "whopping" was a word used by the author of the ARTICLE about the study and NOY a word used by the authors of the study.

The difference between 12.7 and 13 million years matters how? .3 million years in a study of this sort of time scale is well within acceptable variance.

There is a University of Gibraltar!!! Since you couldn't google it I did it for you...

https://www.facebook.com/unigib

If you are going to pick something apart I recommend that you first actually read the article and then think about what you are going to say so that you are accurate before clicking on post.

Edited by DanL
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DieChecker

I'm as much for saving the environment as the next guy, but if it took 13 million years, why do we still have super delicate creatures like corals, butterflies, and frogs? Were they tougher back then?

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Carnoferox
On 9/30/2019 at 8:19 PM, DanL said:

The lead author is Sarah Alvarez and the CO-lead author is Samantha Gibbs. That is how it reads. They are two different people, not one person that turned into another person.

The word "whopping" was a word used by the author of the ARTICLE about the study and NOY a word used by the authors of the study.

The difference between 12.7 and 13 million years matters how? .3 million years in a study of this sort of time scale is well within acceptable variance.

There is a University of Gibraltar!!! Since you couldn't google it I did it for you...

https://www.facebook.com/unigib

If you are going to pick something apart I recommend that you first actually read the article and then think about what you are going to say so that you are accurate before clicking on post.

I'm fairly certain Tom's comment was in jest.

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