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Still Waters

Last woolly mammoths died on remote island

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Ell

I once read a folktale about someone hunting one of those then already rare animals. He was in ambush below the surface of a water, and when the animal passed him on its way to an island, he plunged his spear from below into its belly. Was that a four thousand years old tale? I myself suspected it might be one to two thousand years old.

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Carnoferox
46 minutes ago, Ell said:

I once read a folktale about someone hunting one of those then already rare animals. He was in ambush below the surface of a water, and when the animal passed him on its way to an island, he plunged his spear from below into its belly. Was that a four thousand years old tale? I myself suspected it might be one to two thousand years old.

Citation very much needed. I know of no surviving tales of human encounters with mammoths.

Edited by Carnoferox

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Orphalesion

Yeah I was talking with friend about that very topic the other day. It's quite mind blowing.

Also the lions/cave lions in south-east Europe that might have survived into historical times.

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Carnoferox
8 minutes ago, Orphalesion said:

Yeah I was talking with friend about that very topic the other day. It's quite mind blowing.

Also the lions/cave lions in south-east Europe that might have survived into historical times.

Lions did survive into historical times in southeastern Europe, but they weren’t cave lions (Panthera spelaea). Instead they were populations of the modern lion (Panthera leo leo).

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kel_kel

I really believe this, scientists think they know everything but they really dont. So many of them spout off their

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zygote_myles

Just 4000 years ago. Well I never. :huh:

I wonder if many of the bones showed signs of predation? Perhaps the polar bear or another carnivore, other than man, found it's way to the island and finished them off.

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qxcontinuum

This brings closer one of my theories that everything we know about history is erroneous. We tend to far date a lot.
It's possible that the mytical dragons stories are also nothing but encounters with surviving dinosaurs or pterodactyls.

Edited by qxcontinuum

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Carnoferox
8 minutes ago, qxcontinuum said:

This brings closer one of my theories that everything we know about history is erroneous. We tend to far date a lot.
It's possible that the mytical dragons stories are also nothing but encounters with surviving dinosaurs or pterodactyls.

This is not even comparable to finding living non-avialan dinosaurs or pterosaurs. They went extinct 66 million years ago, an event which is well-dated radiometrically.

Edited by Carnoferox
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qxcontinuum

What if some species survived longer enough to encounter humans. Like the mammoths?

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Carnoferox
2 hours ago, qxcontinuum said:

What if some species survived longer enough to encounter humans. Like the mammoths?

Then there would be clear evidence of this. Dinosaurs were extremely common in the fossil record for 100+ million years, but then we find none of them after 66 Ma. If they had survived we should expect to find their fossils intermingled with Cenozoic mammals including humans.

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Mr.United_Nations

This has been known for years but I believe these were miniature mammoths? 

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Jaded1
3 hours ago, Mr.United_Nations said:

This has been known for years but I believe these were miniature mammoths? 

Yeah, a classic case of island dwarfism. I remember the 4000 year old date being mentioned some years ago but the news is probably being regurgitated due to the international research team's extinction scenario reconstruction (which is new).

Edited by Jaded1

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RoofGardener
3 hours ago, Mr.United_Nations said:

This has been known for years but I believe these were miniature mammoths? 

 

14 minutes ago, Jaded1 said:

Yeah, a classic case of island dwarfism. I remember the 4000 year old date being mentioned some years ago but the news is probably being regurgitated due to the international research team's extinction scenario reconstruction (which is new).

A dwarf mammoth ? ROFL.. isn't that a contradiction in terms ? :D

 

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ThereWeAreThen
On 10/11/2019 at 7:04 AM, kel_kel said:

I really believe this, scientists think they know everything but they really dont. So many of them spout off their

Scientists don't think they know everything. They read what the data tells them with a load of tests. They often admit they've got something wrong.

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Roshman

Old news.
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/last-wooly-mammoths-died-isolated-and-alone-180955208/

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Hammerclaw

Wrangel Island was originally part of the Alaska purchase, but ceded back to Russia after the Russian Revolution.

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jaylemurph
On 10/10/2019 at 1:35 PM, Carnoferox said:

Citation very much needed. I know of no surviving tales of human encounters with mammoths.

/Somebody/ never saw 10,000 BC[E].
 

—Jaylemurph 

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jaylemurph
On 10/11/2019 at 4:37 AM, qxcontinuum said:

This brings closer one of my theories that everything we know about history is erroneous.

I think a more likely scenario is that you don’t understand what history /is/. 
 

—Jaylemurph 

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Carnoferox
30 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

/Somebody/ never saw 10,000 BC[E].
 

—Jaylemurph 

Oh god not that movie. I could go on for days picking apart the inaccuracies!

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