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rashore

What Japan can teach us about cleanliness

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rashore

 

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The students sit with their satchels on their desks, eager to get home after another long day of seven 50-minute classes. They listen patiently as their teacher makes a few announcements about tomorrow’s timetable. Then, as every day, the teacher’s final words: “OK everybody, today’s cleaning roster. Lines one and two will clean the classroom. Lines three and four, the corridor and stairs. And line five will clean the toilets.”

A few groans arise from line five, but the children stand up, grab the mops, cloths and buckets from the broom cupboard at the back of the classroom, and trot off to the toilets. Similar scenes are happening at schools across the country.

Most first-time visitors to Japan are struck by how clean the country is. Then they notice the absence of litter bins. And street sweepers. So they’re left with the question: how does Japan stay so clean?

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20191006-what-japan-can-teach-us-about-cleanliness?utm_source=pocket-newtab

 

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Piney

In a Tendai Buddhist Temple there is no janitor or landscaper. Even the Head Priest and Abbot does his part.

You also can't be spiritually clean and physically dirty and cluttered in Nihonjin philosophy. 

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third_eye

The age old saying... 

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~

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Essan

Whereas for too many in the west the attitude is "why should I clear my rubbish away, we pay other people to do that!"   Hence rubbish thrown on the streets..   And that's by no means a recent attitude either. 

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freetoroam
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A few groans arise from line five, but the children stand up, grab the mops, cloths and buckets from the broom cupboard at the back of the classroom, and trot off to the toilets. Similar scenes are happening at schools across the country

Do they not employ cleaners? Cheap labour. But I suppose it is their mess. 

I still think it starts in the home, clearing up their school desks, yes, but the toilets???

Would like to see this happen in England, but I can see the parents complaining it is abuse of their child and some will insist on a wage. 

We pay our taxes for schools to employ cleaners, will we get a reduction if this is enforced here?

 

 

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Scholar4Truth

They can also teach us about work ethics as well.

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'Walt' E. Kurtz

Never been to Japan it's one of the countries on my bucket list. Sweden is also known for being clean. 

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aztek

japan can teach us much much more than just about cleanigless , but we'll never learn

Edited by aztek
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Scholar4Truth
13 hours ago, aztek said:

japan can teach us much much more than just about cleanigless , but we'll never learn

Such as a code of honor.

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