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Anomalocaris

Oldest Manuscript of the World’s Oldest Novel

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Gwynbleidd

Wow, that is absolutely extraordinary.  

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Scholar4Truth

mr miyagi approved :)

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Hammerclaw

Wonderful. It makes you wonder how many other such finds there might be out there.

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The Wistman

Amazing find.  But...isn't the 12th Dyn. Ancient Egyptian 'Tale of Sinuhe' the first novel?

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Taun
1 hour ago, The Wistman said:

Amazing find.  But...isn't the 12th Dyn. Ancient Egyptian 'Tale of Sinuhe' the first novel?

I'm wondering where the "Epic of Gilgamesh" and "The Iliad" fit in as well...

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third_eye

Probably thousands and thousands more that were lost, burned and destroyed that no one knows about... 

~

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hetrodoxly

Beowulf was penned before long before 1010.

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Desertrat56
4 hours ago, Taun said:

I'm wondering where the "Epic of Gilgamesh" and "The Iliad" fit in as well...

Gilgamesh was written about 2100 BC, quite an old story.  The Iliad was written in the 8th century (1200 years ago relatively recent).

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Taun
19 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

Gilgamesh was written about 2100 BC, quite an old story.  The Iliad was written in the 8th century (1200 years ago relatively recent).

I knew the basic time frames of the two tales, I was just wondering if they counted since they were both basically "religious" in nature and if they were not "novels" by definition... And of course the Iliad was a spoken poem for quite a long time before it was put down in writing...

Edited by Taun
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third_eye

China... The Chinese loves their novel tales... 

~

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MissJatti

1010 AD, im sure theres been novels discovered before that time.

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Desertrat56
On 10/12/2019 at 8:16 AM, Taun said:

I knew the basic time frames of the two tales, I was just wondering if they counted since they were both basically "religious" in nature and if they were not "novels" by definition... And of course the Iliad was a spoken poem for quite a long time before it was put down in writing...

In what way was either of those religious? 

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Taun
2 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

In what way was either of those religious? 

If I remember correctly Gilgamesh was in search of Immortality and was accompanied - or assisted in his quest - by a god or demi-god... It also had other gods figuring in the story - in fact there is an account of "The Flood" that would later seemingly become "Noah's flood"...

The Iliad was a tale of how spiteful and petty Greek Gods could be - and what their pettiness does to the humans that interact with them... So in a sense they were religious (which is why I put the word Religious in quotes)... Were they true novels, or morality plays masked as religious myths?...

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Desertrat56
2 minutes ago, Taun said:

If I remember correctly Gilgamesh was in search of Immortality and was accompanied - or assisted in his quest - by a god or demi-god... It also had other gods figuring in the story - in fact there is an account of "The Flood" that would later seemingly become "Noah's flood"...

The Iliad was a tale of how spiteful and petty Greek Gods could be - and what their pettiness does to the humans that interact with them... So in a sense they were religious (which is why I put the word Religious in quotes)... Were they true novels, or morality plays masked as religious myths?...

I get what you are saying, but maybe we think of religious differently.  Maybe they were morality plays, stories of heros who went where no one else dared.  Stories that included mythological characters, but I think more novels and entertainment than anything.  I do have to say I did not live during the times those stories were originally told so I don't know what people thought of them.

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Taun
2 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

I get what you are saying, but maybe we think of religious differently.  Maybe they were morality plays, stories of heros who went where no one else dared.  Stories that included mythological characters, but I think more novels and entertainment than anything.  I do have to say I did not live during the times those stories were originally told so I don't know what people thought of them.

A very true and commendable statement... (Though sometimes I do feel like I am old enough to have been there :))

When I was in school (back in the pre-historic, pre-internet days) I had a teacher that covered the Greek Myths in class... She stressed to us that Greek Myths (the religious texts of the day) were largely morality tales, meant to teach citizens "proper morality" - and were somewhat apart from "church" (or temple) dogma ... I guess her lessons stuck with me and that is the filter I see ancient myths through...

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