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spartan max2

Study: No evidence for gaming as a disorder

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spartan max2

 

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A new academic study has found “no compelling evidence” to warrant classifying gaming as a clinical disorder in its own right.

 

https://www.videogameschronicle.com/news/study-finds-insufficient-evidence-of-gaming-as-a-clinical-disorder/

 

This is noteworthy because Gaming 

Quote

The World Health Organisation (WHO) voted to officially recognise gaming disorder as an international disease in May.

WHO defines gaming disorder as a pattern of gaming behaviour characterised by “impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming over other activities to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other interests and daily activities, and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences”.

 

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Aaron2016

I've forbidden myself to drive because of video games like Carmageddon and Grand Theft Auto.  I've driven so badly in games over the years so much that I still don't trust myself behind the wheel today because of it.  When I took lessons 12 years ago I drove so recklessly and cared so little about my consequences (full throttle, driving into a bush, mounting the footpath, narrowly hitting people) and my lack of consideration was a result of gaming.  The front car window screen reminded me too much of the gaming TV screen.  I could easily attempt to drive again, but I just don't trust myself to take it seriously enough so that I won't jeopardize the lives of other road users and pedestrians again.  My attitude was always - It's not my car, so what do I care if I trash it, and I don't know any of these people, so what do I care if I hit them.  Law and order just didn't apply, because it did not apply in video games, and my brain had been conditioned subconsciously for so long to believe that, and when I finally sat behind the wheel during my lessons and tests, the seriousness of the situation and what I was doing just didn't register in my mind at all.  The other factor was, I live and work in the city, and never had the necessity to need a car.  On the bright side, I can play GTA without any fatal consequences to worry about. :D

 

 

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ExpandMyMind
11 minutes ago, Aaron2016 said:

I've forbidden myself to drive because of video games like Carmageddon and Grand Theft Auto.  I've driven so badly in games over the years so much that I still don't trust myself behind the wheel today because of it.  When I took lessons 12 years ago I drove so recklessly and cared so little about my consequences (full throttle, driving into a bush, mounting the footpath, narrowly hitting people) and my lack of consideration was a result of gaming.  The front car window screen reminded me too much of the gaming TV screen.  I could easily attempt to drive again, but I just don't trust myself to take it seriously enough so that I won't jeopardize the lives of other road users and pedestrians again.  My attitude was always - It's not my car, so what do I care if I trash it, and I don't know any of these people, so what do I care if I hit them.  Law and order just didn't apply, because it did not apply in video games, and my brain had been conditioned subconsciously for so long to believe that, and when I finally sat behind the wheel during my lessons and tests, the seriousness of the situation and what I was doing just didn't register in my mind at all.  The other factor was, I live and work in the city, and never had the necessity to need a car.  On the bright side, I can play GTA without any fatal consequences to worry about. :D

 

 

Dude, what the actual ****.

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Aquila King

Yay. Upper to middle age scientists who've likely never played a videogame in their lives proving to themselves what the rest of us normies who do play videogames what we already know.

f0cc8b9.jpg

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Aquila King
23 minutes ago, Aaron2016 said:

I've forbidden myself to drive because of video games like Carmageddon and Grand Theft Auto.  I've driven so badly in games over the years so much that I still don't trust myself behind the wheel today because of it.  When I took lessons 12 years ago I drove so recklessly and cared so little about my consequences (full throttle, driving into a bush, mounting the footpath, narrowly hitting people) and my lack of consideration was a result of gaming.  The front car window screen reminded me too much of the gaming TV screen.  I could easily attempt to drive again, but I just don't trust myself to take it seriously enough so that I won't jeopardize the lives of other road users and pedestrians again.  My attitude was always - It's not my car, so what do I care if I trash it, and I don't know any of these people, so what do I care if I hit them.  Law and order just didn't apply, because it did not apply in video games, and my brain had been conditioned subconsciously for so long to believe that, and when I finally sat behind the wheel during my lessons and tests, the seriousness of the situation and what I was doing just didn't register in my mind at all.  The other factor was, I live and work in the city, and never had the necessity to need a car.  On the bright side, I can play GTA without any fatal consequences to worry about. :D

I can't tell if this is intentional satire, or you're just trolling... :huh:

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Aaron2016
33 minutes ago, Aquila King said:

I can't tell if this is intentional satire, or you're just trolling... :huh:

Real life.

Play a video game with a specific theme (running over people and destroying property) and play that kind of game genre for 30 hours per week, every week, for over 15 years.  Now you are offered to get behind the wheel of a real car and drive through a densely populated area.  It messes with your head.  It's not easy to mentally tune out something that dominated your youth and immersed your life for 15 years.  When I took lessons I just had no concern whatever for my actions.  Every pedestrian had a 500 point symbol above their heads.  Not literally of course, but that kind of mentality was buried in my subconscious, and when I drove I would become so relaxed and begin to daydream and my subconscious would take over and I would swerve into oncoming traffic because I was bored, and I would make intentional mistakes because there was an overwhelming impulse to do it.  If I had not immersed myself so much in GTA style games for so long, then I believe I could have taken driving more seriously.

Videos games conditioned me to be that way.  Monkey see, monkey do.

 

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spartan max2

I honestly really have trouble believing you lol

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Aquila King
7 minutes ago, Aaron2016 said:

Real life.

Play a video game with a specific theme (running over people and destroying property) and play that kind of game genre for 30 hours per week, every week, for over 15 years.  Now you are offered to get behind the wheel of a real car and drive through a densely populated area.  It messes with your head.  It's not easy to mentally tune out something that dominated your youth and immersed your life for 15 years.  When I took lessons I just had no concern whatever for my actions.  Every pedestrian had a 500 point symbol above their heads.  Not literally of course, but that kind of mentality was buried in my subconscious, and when I drove I would become so relaxed and begin to daydream and my subconscious would take over and I would swerve into oncoming traffic because I was bored, and I would make intentional mistakes because there was an overwhelming impulse to do it.  If I had not immersed myself so much in GTA style games for so long, then I believe I could have taken driving more seriously.

Videos games conditioned me to be that way.  Monkey see, monkey do.

Okay, you're clearly either 1 of 3 things:

  1. Just a petty internet troll trying to get a reaction out of people by saying something off the wall bats**t insane.
  2. You were literally just born a moronic psychopath who only viewed other human beings as hit points because you lacked that basic moral compass to begin with.
  3. You've basically never played a videogame in your life, and/or are outright lying about all of this because you're anti-videogame for whatever reason (which is the most likely case here).

Either way, your entire story here is complete and utter bulls**t because literally billions of people around the globe are gamers, and statistically speaking the overwhelming majority of us are not in any way compelled to do violence.

The science is clear: there is no link between videogames and violence. Period.

If you're violent, it isn't the videogames you play, it's your own damn self. To argue otherwise is to simply deflect from any personal responsibility and to ignore proven scientific facts that anyone who knows diddly-poop about videogames already knows to be true. You might as well be arguing for a flat earth here.

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joc
1 hour ago, Aaron2016 said:

play that kind of game genre for 30 hours per week, every week, for over 15 years. 

Yeah....nobody does that...I don't believe you!  Human nature and all....boredom and all...not buying it...I seriously doubt you spent 23,400 hours of your life playing Grand Theft Auto. 

Edited by joc
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Gwynbleidd
2 hours ago, Aquila King said:

Yay. Upper to middle age scientists who've likely never played a videogame in their lives proving to themselves what the rest of us normies who do play videogames what we already know.

Excellently said Aquila!  I especially loved your use of "normies". :lol:

 

Nevertheless, we can all breathe a sigh of relief and get back to it then, shall we?  *Snatches the PS4 controller and arcs up RDD* :P 

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Farmer77
3 hours ago, spartan max2 said:

Yeah I dont buy this study. I see it in my personal life. Having grown up with junkies and alcoholics I see the exact, and I do mean exact with mood swings and "hangovers" etc , same behavior in my 20 y/o son who is the prototypical "gamer" as I did with junkies and alcoholics.

 

 

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spartan max2
10 minutes ago, Farmer77 said:

Yeah I dont buy this study. I see it in my personal life. Having grown up with junkies and alcoholics I see the exact, and I do mean exact with mood swings and "hangovers" etc , same behavior in my 20 y/o son who is the prototypical "gamer" as I did with junkies and alcoholics.

 

 

The study is making the claim that it's not gaming but individuals who's basic needs are not being met are masking the problems through gaming to escape. 

Aka, stating over gaming is a symptom not the cause.

 

 

Edited by spartan max2
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Farmer77
4 minutes ago, spartan max2 said:

The study is making the claim that it's not gaming but individuals who's basic needs are not being met are masking the problems through gaming to escape. 

 

Oh absolutely but I dont see how you separate that from any other addictive chemical and say the chemical isnt a problem.  Obvioosuly in this case games help your brain create the chemical rather than introducing something externally but the results are the same.

I guess the following from the article is how I think of all addictions

Quote

Rather than being negatively impacted by gaming itself, it’s suggested that young people who engage in dysfunctional gaming may be doing so in a bid to escape “underlying frustrations and wider psychosocial functioning issues”.

.

 

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XenoFish
1 hour ago, Aaron2016 said:

Real life.

Play a video game with a specific theme (running over people and destroying property) and play that kind of game genre for 30 hours per week, every week, for over 15 years.  Now you are offered to get behind the wheel of a real car and drive through a densely populated area.  It messes with your head.  It's not easy to mentally tune out something that dominated your youth and immersed your life for 15 years.  When I took lessons I just had no concern whatever for my actions.  Every pedestrian had a 500 point symbol above their heads.  Not literally of course, but that kind of mentality was buried in my subconscious, and when I drove I would become so relaxed and begin to daydream and my subconscious would take over and I would swerve into oncoming traffic because I was bored, and I would make intentional mistakes because there was an overwhelming impulse to do it.  If I had not immersed myself so much in GTA style games for so long, then I believe I could have taken driving more seriously.

Videos games conditioned me to be that way.  Monkey see, monkey do.

 

Sorry, but I'm not buying this one bit. 

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spartan max2
38 minutes ago, Farmer77 said:

Oh absolutely but I dont see how you separate that from any other addictive chemical and say the chemical isnt a problem.  Obvioosuly in this case games help your brain create the chemical rather than introducing something externally but the results are the same.

I guess the following from the article is how I think of all addictions

.

 

That's reasonable. 

But someone can be addicted to heroine itself, the underlying problems can stop but you would still have the heroine addiction.

Making something a gaming addiction is claiming that you can be addicted the gaming itself. Where I think that with gaming once the underlying problems are solved then the game time would naturally go down. 

 

I like this quote. 

Quote

"Neuroscientist Nastasia Griffioen recently warned of the dangers of stigmatising people as being addicted to video games. “If we do stigmatise people basically as being addicted to video games, we might take away those video games when they might be a coping mechanism for a deeper, underlying problem like depression or anxiety”, she said."

 

People can be addicted to anything, we can't make everything a disorder lol.

For example when someone has a heroine addiction you have to treat the use.

Where as if you are treating the use in a video game "disorder" it's not going to solve anything. 

Getting someone to play less video games isn't going to solve problems of addiction the same way as say getting someone to gamble less or to drink less. 

 

Edited by spartan max2
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Aaron2016
8 hours ago, joc said:

Yeah....nobody does that...I don't believe you!  Human nature and all....boredom and all...not buying it...I seriously doubt you spent 23,400 hours of your life playing Grand Theft Auto. 

I said, that I played that kind of genre, not that specific game.  When you grow up with no friends, and no reason to go out, except for school, with parents constantly arguing, you look for an escape, and video games were my escape.  What else is there to do?  It was like a drug.

 

 

Edited by Aaron2016

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Aaron2016
7 hours ago, XenoFish said:

Sorry, but I'm not buying this one bit. 

16 bit ;)

As the old saying goes, people do not accept what they do not understand.

 

Edited by Aaron2016

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spartan max2
2 hours ago, Aaron2016 said:

I said, that I played that kind of genre, not that specific game.  When you grow up with no friends, and no reason to go out, except for school, with parents constantly arguing, you look for an escape, and video games were my escape.  What else is there to do?  It was like a drug.

 

 

The expierence of driving a car in real life and playing driving a car in a video game are so vastly different that your story sounds fake lol 

And you expect me to believe that sine you could run over people in GTA that somehow you just did not care about running people over IRL ? Lol

Either you had problems that you are projecting onto your video game is or you are making stuff up 

Edited by spartan max2
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Aaron2016
1 hour ago, spartan max2 said:

The expierence of driving a car in real life and playing driving a car in a video game are so vastly different that your story sounds fake lol 

And you expect me to believe that sine you could run over people in GTA that somehow you just did not care about running people over IRL ? Lol

Either you had problems that you are projecting onto your video game is or you are making stuff up 

I said subconsciously.  I'm not consciously aware that I want to drive recklessly, but when I drove and took 14 lessons and two tests, I was continually daydreaming because driving was so easy and my mind was doing things automatically, to the point that my subconscious was taking over, and I was drifting into oncoming traffic, and narrowly missing other cars and pedestrians because I was not concentrating and taking it seriously because I was thinking of GTA style games 24/7 because that was my life outside school and college, and when you sit comfortably behind the driver's seat and look behind a screen, it is very easy to forget that this is real life, and not a game.  e.g.  If you watch trigger happy gunslinger westerns and action films religiously and play those types of games religiously and enjoy killing civilians just for the fun of it, and play with toy guns just the same, and then one day a real gun is placed in your hands, then an element of danger exists because the gun owner has been conditioned to take the attitude that their actions will not lead to any consequences.  Life is just a game, because for 90% of his/her life up to that point, that is all that they know and that has been at the forefront of their subconscious.

Overwhelming impulses and urges can be triggered by the subconscious.  When bad things happen we are not even aware that we are doing it, until we've done it.

 

 

Edited by Aaron2016
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ThereWeAreThen
3 hours ago, Aaron2016 said:

I said, that I played that kind of genre, not that specific game.  When you grow up with no friends, and no reason to go out, except for school, with parents constantly arguing, you look for an escape, and video games were my escape.  What else is there to do?  It was like a drug.

 

 

I'm not saying whether I believe your story or not, to be honest I cant be arsed reading it. Needs paragraphs for me to even attempt it.

However, I can relate to gaming as an "escape ", I play WoW alot and I just feel like I can forget about my problems momentarily. Its soothing. Unless you're getting constantly killed by other people. :rofl:

But yea, I haven't been gaming as much the past two weeks, my mood has plummeted and I've been drinking more which is my other "escape" shall we say.

But yea, apolagies if I have steered off topic but as I said. Not saying what you said is true but can relate to the escape part.

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spartan max2
29 minutes ago, Aaron2016 said:

I said subconsciously.  I'm not consciously aware that I want to drive recklessly, but when I drove and took 14 lessons and two tests, I was continually daydreaming because driving was so easy and my mind was doing things automatically, to the point that my subconscious was taking over, and I was drifting into oncoming traffic, and narrowly missing other cars and pedestrians because I was not concentrating and taking it seriously because I was thinking of GTA style games 24/7 because that was my life outside school and college, and when you sit comfortably behind the driver's seat and look behind a screen, it is very easy to forget that this is real life, and not a game.  e.g.  If you watch trigger happy gunslinger westerns and action films religiously and play those types of games religiously and enjoy killing civilians just for the fun of it, and play with toy guns just the same, and then one day a real gun is placed in your hands, then an element of danger exists because the gun owner has been conditioned to take the attitude that their actions will not lead to any consequences.  Life is just a game, because for 90% of his/her life up to that point, that is all that they know and that has been at the forefront of their subconscious.

Overwhelming impulses and urges can be triggered by the subconscious.  When bad things happen we are not even aware that we are doing it, until we've done it.

 

 

I'm now pretty sure you are just an old man who has never touched a video game before lol:lol:

Or there's a small chance you're a bad driver who can't take responsibility for being a bad driver.

I played the crap out of COD and Halo growing up. I own guns. I go to the gun range, I even have my concealed carry license. I also played paint ball a little bit growing up.

By your logic I should have lost touch with reality by now and of randomly shot someone lol

 

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Aaron2016
2 hours ago, spartan max2 said:

I'm now pretty sure you are just an old man who has never touched a video game before lol:lol:

Or there's a small chance you're a bad driver who can't take responsibility for being a bad driver.

I played the crap out of COD and Halo growing up. I own guns. I go to the gun range, I even have my concealed carry license. I also played paint ball a little bit growing up.

By your logic I should have lost touch with reality by now and of randomly shot someone lol

 

34, and gaming was essentially my life from the age of 6 to 25 and then I developed an outdoor social life for the first time and lost interest in PC and console gaming, but also because the games just weren't as good as they were back in the mid 90's.  Try doing everything you did with a gun only solo, with nobody to socialize for years.  Just you and your gun, and your mind slowly creeping into madness as the months and years go by with not a friend or a care in the world.  Picture that mentality with long-term exposure to Destruction Derby and GTA style games, using steering wheel simulated controls, and then soon after you are sitting behind the wheel of a real car with real consequences.  It's not easy to switch off the impulse to break the law when you have been conditioned to break it in video games every day for years.

One minute your driving and daydreaming and the next......

 

 

Father Ted reference:

hZhI6Py.gif

 

 

 

Edited by Aaron2016

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Aquila King

ZomboMeme 22102019142154.jpg

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Aaron2016

Talking to a brick wall.

 

giphy.gif

 

 

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