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VastLand

Influence on English, in regard to semitic

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Harte

That term might be part of the English language today, but I've never used it so it doesn't count.

Harte

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jmccr8
23 minutes ago, Harte said:

That term might be part of the English language today, but I've never used it so it doesn't count.

Harte

Hi Harte

I did once but thought he was swearing at me and punched him,oops:whistle:

jmccr8

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Golden Duck
4 hours ago, Harte said:

That term might be part of the English language today, but I've never used it so it doesn't count.

Harte

Algorithm? 

tenor.gif

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littlebrowndragon
On 11/7/2019 at 6:51 AM, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

The Scots were supposed to be descended from an exiled Egyptian Princess called Scotia.

Yikes!  I exclaim so because I was born and brought up in Scotland.  I had always thought the original Scots were an Irish tribe who first crossed over into Scotland via Kintyre, this being the nearest place to Ireland in Scotland - only something like 22 miles distant, I believe. (You get a terrific view of Ireland from the Mull of Kintyre.)  I can't say that the Scots look very middle eastern, nor have I noticed that they "walk like an Egyptian" except, perhaps, after a dram or two. 

Edited by littlebrowndragon
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Desertrat56
8 minutes ago, littlebrowndragon said:

Yikes!  I exclaim so because I was born and brought up in Scotland.  I had always thought the original Scots were an Irish tribe who first crossed over into Scotland via Kintyre, this being the nearest place to Ireland in Scotland - only something like 22 miles distant, I believe. (You get a terrific view of Ireland from the Mull of Kintyre.)  I can't say that the Scots look very middle eastern, nor have I noticed that they "walk like an Egyptian" except, perhaps, after a dram or two. 

It wasn't exactly that.  One of the Brian's was trading with an egyptian and married his daughter Scotia, who brought her entourage with her, but the scottish are celtic, not egyptian.

P.S. Egypt is in Africa not the middle east.

Edited by Desertrat56
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littlebrowndragon
Just now, Desertrat56 said:

It wasn't exactly that.  One of the Brian's was trading with an egyptian and married his daughter Scotia, who brought her entourage with her, but the scottish are celtic, not egyptian.

Thank you, but  yes, I did realise that the Scots are Celtic.  My attempt at humour is not always successful - some work to do there, I think!  However, who is "one of the Brian's"?

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Desertrat56
9 minutes ago, littlebrowndragon said:

Thank you, but  yes, I did realise that the Scots are Celtic.  My attempt at humour is not always successful - some work to do there, I think!  However, who is "one of the Brian's"?

I was taught that Brian was what the king was called in the olden days.  The leader.

Like Merlin was not a proper name, it was the title of the head druid.

And sorry, I am usually quite literal minded, so I don't always get jokes if I can't see your face.

 

Edited by Desertrat56

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littlebrowndragon
4 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

I was taught that Brian was what the king was called in the olden days.  The leader.

Like Merlin was not a proper name, it was the title of the head druid.

And sorry, I am usually quite literal minded, so I don't always get jokes if I can't see your face.

 

 Interesting.  I never knew that Merlin was not a proper name, nor that Brian is used similarly.

As to the joke, it was a poor attempt.  I was just being silly, and I'm in a silly mood today for some reason.

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jaylemurph
1 hour ago, Desertrat56 said:

Like Merlin was not a proper name, it was the title of the head druid.

I’ve never heard that before, and it certainly doesn’t appear in Ceasar, the only substantial collection of information about the Druids. Source?

—Jaylemurph 

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Desertrat56
1 minute ago, jaylemurph said:

I’ve never heard that before, and it certainly doesn’t appear in Ceasar, the only substantial collection of information about the Druids. Source?

—Jaylemurph 

Ceasar is a book or a website or what?

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jaylemurph
3 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

Ceasar is a book or a website or what?

Sigh. 

Ceasar — Gaius Julius Ceasar — was a person. Of some historical note. His (book) Commentaria de Bello Gallico is effectively the only source of info on the Druids, and even it isn’t 100% reliable. 

If you don’t know that, I think it’s unlikely your idea about Merlin being some sort of title has a lot of merit. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Desertrat56
Just now, jaylemurph said:

Sigh. 

Ceasar — Gaius Julius Ceasar — was a person. Of some historical note. His (book) Commentaria de Bello Gallico is effectively the only source of info on the Druids, and even it isn’t 100% reliable. 

If you don’t know that, I think it’s unlikely your idea about Merlin being some sort of title has a lot of merit. 

—Jaylemurph 

But Ceasar was a title as well.  So the guys name was Gaius Julius and he was a roman ceasar?   Thanks for the name of the book.  If it isn't 100% reliable then you don't have any better information than I have.  I will see if I can find a book or a link for you.  I assume your book talks about some druid named Merlin?  Is it a translation from ancient latin into english?

 

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jaylemurph

Wikipedia is free and infinitely patient. 
 

I charge $40/hr for tutoring and am fully booked til the end of the year. 
 

—Jaylemurph 

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Desertrat56
5 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

Wikipedia is free and infinitely patient. 
 

I charge $40/hr for tutoring and am fully booked til the end of the year. 
 

—Jaylemurph 

Wikipedia is not trustworthy.  I can find you some examples of that if you want. And I don't need tutoring and consider you are trying to insult me but your issue, not mine.

Just because you have an education doesn't mean you know everything.

Edited by Desertrat56

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jaylemurph
4 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

Wikipedia is not trustworthy.  I can find you some examples of that if you want. And I don't need tutoring and consider you are trying to insult me but your issue, not mine.

Just because you have an education doesn't mean you know everything.

My point was that I’m not here to provide you basic info, esp. when it’s freely, easily available online. 

That you don’t trust a fairly reliable source is your own quirk, not a valid complaint: any tool is only as good as the person using it. 

That said, (claiming) not knowing who Julius Caesar was is not a good reason to trust your other claims about that era of the past. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Desertrat56
7 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

My point was that I’m not here to provide you basic info, esp. when it’s freely, easily available online. 

That you don’t trust a fairly reliable source is your own quirk, not a valid complaint: any tool is only as good as the person using it. 

That said, (claiming) not knowing who Julius Caesar was is not a good reason to trust your other claims about that era of the past. 

—Jaylemurph 

I never claimed I didn't know who Julius Caeser was, I never knew he wrote a book about the druids.  Also, why would you consider a roman's book about celtic druids more comprehensive than something actual celtic druids wrote?  And I was pointing out how superior you seem to like to act.  Is that an affectation or an actual affliction?

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jaylemurph
5 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

Also, why would you consider a roman's book about celtic druids more comprehensive than something actual celtic druids wrote?

Because the Druids never wrote anything about themselves. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Sir Wearer of Hats
2 hours ago, littlebrowndragon said:

Yikes!  I exclaim so because I was born and brought up in Scotland.  I had always thought the original Scots were an Irish tribe who first crossed over into Scotland via Kintyre, this being the nearest place to Ireland in Scotland - only something like 22 miles distant, I believe. (You get a terrific view of Ireland from the Mull of Kintyre.)  I can't say that the Scots look very middle eastern, nor have I noticed that they "walk like an Egyptian" except, perhaps, after a dram or two. 

They were, “Princess Scotia” is some mad fringe theory with less evidence than “Elvis is Alive” has.

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Sir Wearer of Hats
56 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

But Ceasar was a title as well.  So the guys name was Gaius Julius and he was a roman ceasar?

 

Ceasar was Gaius Julius’ name, the later like of leaders adopted it as a title.

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Desertrat56
2 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

Ceasar was Gaius Julius’ name, the later like of leaders adopted it as a title.

So Ceasar was not  a title until after the romans invaded briton?

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Sir Wearer of Hats
3 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

So Ceasar was not  a title until after the romans invaded briton?

It was not a title full stop. It was the adopted family name of the line of successors to Gaius Julius until (IIRC) Vespasian after that it became a short hand for “the leader of rhe Roman Empire”.

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jaylemurph
28 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

It was not a title full stop. It was the adopted family name of the line of successors to Gaius Julius until (IIRC) Vespasian after that it became a short hand for “the leader of rhe Roman Empire”.

No, Desert is right. Caesar was an official term  after 287 CE, when Diocletian split the empire. The Augusti were senior emperors (one in the east and one in the west) and Caesares were junior (also one in the east and west). 

It was used as a family name for the Julio-Claudian dynasty, and afterwards a title of respect usually adopted by new emperors. Then the official use, up until the fifth century. 

—Jaylemurph 

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cormac mac airt
2 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

But Ceasar was a title as well.  So the guys name was Gaius Julius and he was a roman ceasar?   Thanks for the name of the book.  If it isn't 100% reliable then you don't have any better information than I have.  I will see if I can find a book or a link for you.  I assume your book talks about some druid named Merlin?  Is it a translation from ancient latin into english?

 

Isn’t Merlin a variation of Myrrdin or something like that? 
 

cormac

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jmccr8
29 minutes ago, cormac mac airt said:

Isn’t Merlin a variation of Myrrdin or something like that? 
 

cormac

Hi Cormac

This is what I found.

https://www.behindthename.com/name/merlin

GenderMasculine

UsageArthurian Romance, English

PronouncedMUR-lin(English)  [key · IPA]

Meaning & History

Form of the Welsh name Myrddin (meaning "sea fortress") used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his 12th-century Arthurian tales. Writing in Latin, he likely chose the form Merlinus over Merdinus in order to prevent associations with French merde "excrement".Geoffrey based parts of Merlin's character on Myrddin Wyllt, a semi-legendary madman and prophet who lived in the Caledonian Forest. Other parts of his life were based on that of the historical 5th-century Romano-British military leader Ambrosius Aurelianus. In Geoffrey's version of the tales and later embellishments Merlin is a wizard and counselor for King Arthur.

See All Relations · Show Family Tree

Related Names

VariantMerlyn(English)

Other Languages & CulturesMyrddin(Welsh Mythology)

User SubmissionsMerlín, Merlin

 

jmccr8

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Kenemet
3 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

I never claimed I didn't know who Julius Caeser was, I never knew he wrote a book about the druids.  Also, why would you consider a roman's book about celtic druids more comprehensive than something actual celtic druids wrote?  And I was pointing out how superior you seem to like to act.  Is that an affectation or an actual affliction?

The druids did not have any form of writing.

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