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Eldorado

"Absolute panic" amid Australia bushfires

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Desertrat56

WOW!  That is a lot of rain!  I hope it quenches some of the fires.

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openozy
8 hours ago, Myles said:

Is there any positives to these fires?    Obviously they don't outweigh the negatives, I just like to find a silver lining.  

Example:

With global warming, the positives could include - more farm-able land in northern areas.   The finding of more ancient items as permafrost melts.   

 

The only positives were as I said before the smoke haze blocking the sun a bit.It's the intense heat and dry which is the main worry,my corn crop failed this year and I had water.My niece works for Edgell and they have no work this corn season.

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Sir Wearer of Hats
15 hours ago, openozy said:

Things have changed dramatically here,I started noticing it about 20years ago but it's escalating each year.The last 4 years it's got really bad,whether man made or a natural event.I can see Oz being uninhabitable sooner than we think.

I think we will survive, but our population will never be much larger than it is now. It will be a hard survival, a mentally, physically and financially hard survival but look up stubborn and there’s a picture of an Australian in the dictionary. The only thing that will make survival impossible is if the government doesn’t adapt as well, so we’re ****ed as long as the LNP is in power and charisma vacuums like Shorten and Albonezzi are leading Labor. 

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susieice
3 hours ago, Golden Duck said:

Here's a video of the reaction to the rain in Cunnuamulla.

 

I'm seeing this too. A lot of rain coming to Australia. I sure hope it puts a lot of these fires out and wets a lot of the areas that haven't burned yet down.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7895063/Heaviest-downpour-MONTHS-come-weekend-rain-bomb-giving-firefighters-needed-hope.html?fbclid=IwAR2X5-x9oQOUALqsYV7-cXm4XH_6HpGE5iaqGN1qxLyV-EMBWhH4WNGUyQ0

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openozy
2 hours ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

I think we will survive, but our population will never be much larger than it is now. It will be a hard survival, a mentally, physically and financially hard survival but look up stubborn and there’s a picture of an Australian in the dictionary. The only thing that will make survival impossible is if the government doesn’t adapt as well, so we’re ****ed as long as the LNP is in power and charisma vacuums like Shorten and Albonezzi are leading Labor. 

If the heat keeps coming back we won't be able to farm here and will have to resort to more mining, worsening the situation.We had next to no insects around here this summer,dead stock were rotting in their own juices.If the most important creatures to the environment go it will be a domino effect that no government can help.I hope it gets better but I'm getting resigned to the worst case scenario.

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susieice

This is an incredible story! What an awesome job by the Australian firefighters! Thank you!! 

Aussie Firefighters Save World's Only Groves Of Prehistoric Wollemi Pines

Edited by susieice
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susieice

Three US firefighters died today when their water bomber aircraft crashed in the Snowy Monaro area. It looks like it's close to Canberra. They were flying a plane from the US company Coulson Aviation, which has grounded it's large tanker planes for the rest of the day. We hear a lot now about rain, but there are still a lot of fires in NSW and Victoria that are not under control.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7919141/Water-bomber-aircraft-CRASHES-Snowy-Mountains-helicopters-search-bushland-wreckage.html?ito=social-facebook&fbclid=IwAR3VXOJ637TH6Ht8V1J3EZzGsAM2dAGnFhwSMQZtev85R9vLSXYJdtca990

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tmcom

So we had apocalyptic, unprecedented rain to put out the apocalyptic, unprecedented fires, mainly caused by the apocalyptic, unprecedented arsonists!

^_^

 

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Habitat
13 minutes ago, tmcom said:

So we had apocalyptic, unprecedented rain to put out the apocalyptic, unprecedented fires, mainly caused by the apocalyptic, unprecedented arsonists!

^_^

 

Don't forget the BOM talking up flash floods that are "one in 100 year events", but happen roughly every five years. I really do think there is a culture in there to exaggerate, and cherry-pick angles that make things look, er, apocalyptic.

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tmcom
29 minutes ago, Habitat said:

Don't forget the BOM talking up flash floods that are "one in 100 year events", but happen roughly every five years. I really do think there is a culture in there to exaggerate, and cherry-pick angles that make things look, er, apocalyptic.

Well, you know, the manager of BOM, gets up makes the unprecedented decision to use mint toothpaste instead of an other one, then watches all of the apocalyptic news on the ABC, and spends the rest of the day believing we are doomed.

Pretty hard to think rationally when faced with impending doom, unless it involves hoarding canned beans?

 

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Golden Duck
12 hours ago, Habitat said:

Don't forget the BOM talking up flash floods that are "one in 100 year events", but happen roughly every five years. I really do think there is a culture in there to exaggerate, and cherry-pick angles that make things look, er, apocalyptic.

 

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Crikey

Guys, a terrorist magazine carried instructions on how to make fire bombs to destroy American forests, should we be worried?

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Peter B
On 1/23/2020 at 7:30 PM, tmcom said:

So we had apocalyptic, unprecedented rain to put out the apocalyptic, unprecedented fires, mainly caused by the apocalyptic, unprecedented arsonists!

^_^

 

I'd like to think you have more evidence for this statement than that you heard a few politicians say it.

But the evidence I've founds suggests you're likely to be wrong. You might like to try this article first: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-15/is-arson-mostly-to-blame-for-the-bushfire-crisis/11865724

The key point the experts are making is this: most of the fires over the last couple of months have started in remote locations; and fires in remote locations are usually started by natural causes, in particular dry lightning storms.

Arson fires are much more likely to be started near urban areas. But even then, fires near urban areas can be caused by a range of factors other than arson. The fire between Queanbeyan and Canberra Airport last night was started when strong winds blew a tree branch onto power lines. The Baldivis fire a couple of weeks ago near Perth was caused when a trailer wheel fell off and the axle scraping on the road caused sparks. The Binna Burra fire in November last year was probably caused by a discarded cigarette. Another fire in the area a couple of weeks later was apparently caused by an army live fire exercise. In December, backburning around the Gospers Mountain fire got out of hand and destroyed houses. The Black Saturday fires in 2009 were in part caused by arson but in other cases by strong winds blowing down power lines.

As for the "apocalyptic, unprecedented rain", well, I'm sure a lot of people appreciated the effect of the rain on the fires, but did anyone claim it was apocalyptic or unprecedented? In any case I didn't appreciate the effect of the hail on my car, either: something like 150 hail dents on the bonnet, roof, boot and left side, and a cracked windscreen.

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tmcom
15 minutes ago, Peter B said:

I'd like to think you have more evidence for this statement than that you heard a few politicians say it.

But the evidence I've founds suggests you're likely to be wrong. You might like to try this article first: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-15/is-arson-mostly-to-blame-for-the-bushfire-crisis/11865724

The key point the experts are making is this: most of the fires over the last couple of months have started in remote locations; and fires in remote locations are usually started by natural causes, in particular dry lightning storms.

Arson fires are much more likely to be started near urban areas. But even then, fires near urban areas can be caused by a range of factors other than arson. The fire between Queanbeyan and Canberra Airport last night was started when strong winds blew a tree branch onto power lines. The Baldivis fire a couple of weeks ago near Perth was caused when a trailer wheel fell off and the axle scraping on the road caused sparks. The Binna Burra fire in November last year was probably caused by a discarded cigarette. Another fire in the area a couple of weeks later was apparently caused by an army live fire exercise. In December, backburning around the Gospers Mountain fire got out of hand and destroyed houses. The Black Saturday fires in 2009 were in part caused by arson but in other cases by strong winds blowing down power lines.

As for the "apocalyptic, unprecedented rain", well, I'm sure a lot of people appreciated the effect of the rain on the fires, but did anyone claim it was apocalyptic or unprecedented? In any case I didn't appreciate the effect of the hail on my car, either: something like 150 hail dents on the bonnet, roof, boot and left side, and a cracked windscreen.

Point taken, but a cyclone in the Indian sea, is going to cause freak occurrences.

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Peter B
On 1/24/2020 at 8:42 PM, tmcom said:

Point taken, but a cyclone in the Indian sea, is going to cause freak occurrences.

It's going to have to be pretty freaky for a cyclone in the Indian Ocean to cause a month of smoke haze.

And that's only part of what we've experienced in Canberra this summer: six days in a row of temperatures in the range of 35 to 40 degrees in December; five or six weeks of pretty much continuous smoke haze, including several days of literally the worst quality air anywhere in the world; a hail storm that's damaged well over a thousand cars and left thousands of people potentially waiting months for damage assessments; a bushfire which both closed the city's airport and cut our home phone and internet access for about 12 hours; and all the while we've been surrounded by bushfires that are taking weeks to contain, let alone put out.

If this is the new normal for Canberra summers, then yes, I think we're entitled to (a) use the word "unprecedented", and (b) look for some action from the government on climate change mitigation.

The thing about the hail storm is this:

1. I couldn't put an insurance claim in online, and had to wait on the phone for an hour before I got to talk to a call centre person. That was Wednesday morning. Fair enough, he was courteous and helpful. And he said the assessors would call me in 24-48 hours to book a time for an assessment. They haven't called back, so I'll give them until Wednesday next week before I chase them. Only annoying, but still annoying...

2. On the news tonight was a report suggesting that people are being given appointments 3 months in the future before their cars will be assessed. In the meantime, cars with cracked windscreens legally can't be driven.

3. Theoretically my car is driveable if I get the windscreen replaced. But I can't do the windscreen repair separately from the other damage repair, so I still have to wait until all the damage can be fixed in one go, however long that might be. So in the meantime my car has to stay off the road.

4. My policy provides me with a replacement hire car, but only while the car is in for repairs. Until that happens - who knows how far in the future - no hire car. Now fortunately we have two cars, and public transport is an option for me to get to work, but it's ridiculously slow compared with driving. What about the families with one car, now undriveable, that's going to stay that way for months, who have little or no access to public transport to get to work? (And Canberra's weekend bus services are terrible.) These families, obviously mostly poorer families, are going to take a bad financial hit. It'd be nice to know the government has ideas for how it might help them.

So now, in addition to the transport, energy and tourism hits to the economy caused by the fires (as well as a couple of thousand homes and businesses destroyed) we have the insurance hit caused by this hail storm.

So pardon me if I find your incessant use of "she'll be right" winkies unhelpful and annoying.

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tmcom
3 hours ago, Peter B said:

It's going to have to be pretty freaky for a cyclone in the Indian Ocean to cause a month of smoke haze.

And that's only part of what we've experienced in Canberra this summer: six days in a row of temperatures in the range of 35 to 40 degrees in December; five or six weeks of pretty much continuous smoke haze, including several days of literally the worst quality air anywhere in the world; a hail storm that's damaged well over a thousand cars and left thousands of people potentially waiting months for damage assessments; a bushfire which both closed the city's airport and cut our home phone and internet access for about 12 hours; and all the while we've been surrounded by bushfires that are taking weeks to contain, let alone put out.

If this is the new normal for Canberra summers, then yes, I think we're entitled to (a) use the word "unprecedented", and (b) look for some action from the government on climate change mitigation.

The thing about the hail storm is this:

1. I couldn't put an insurance claim in online, and had to wait on the phone for an hour before I got to talk to a call centre person. That was Wednesday morning. Fair enough, he was courteous and helpful. And he said the assessors would call me in 24-48 hours to book a time for an assessment. They haven't called back, so I'll give them until Wednesday next week before I chase them. Only annoying, but still annoying...

2. On the news tonight was a report suggesting that people are being given appointments 3 months in the future before their cars will be assessed. In the meantime, cars with cracked windscreens legally can't be driven.

3. Theoretically my car is driveable if I get the windscreen replaced. But I can't do the windscreen repair separately from the other damage repair, so I still have to wait until all the damage can be fixed in one go, however long that might be. So in the meantime my car has to stay off the road.

4. My policy provides me with a replacement hire car, but only while the car is in for repairs. Until that happens - who knows how far in the future - no hire car. Now fortunately we have two cars, and public transport is an option for me to get to work, but it's ridiculously slow compared with driving. What about the families with one car, now undriveable, that's going to stay that way for months, who have little or no access to public transport to get to work? (And Canberra's weekend bus services are terrible.) These families, obviously mostly poorer families, are going to take a bad financial hit. It'd be nice to know the government has ideas for how it might help them.

So now, in addition to the transport, energy and tourism hits to the economy caused by the fires (as well as a couple of thousand homes and businesses destroyed) we have the insurance hit caused by this hail storm.

So pardon me if I find your incessant use of "she'll be right" winkies unhelpful and annoying.

Freak occurrences as in hail storms, not smoke haze, which is caused by mismanagement of our park areas, and yes hot days, and a lot of arsonists.

The worst hail storm occurred hundreds of years ago when CO2 was a joke or very low, (overseas) which was at bowling ball scales and destroyed anything in its path, (that means killed most humans and livestock).

And a week of 35 to 40 is bad, but Sydney has had worse or a month of those temp's.

Or when l was a kid in the 70's, l remember a similar week of 35 to 40 d, days or a week, in October, that was also when scientists were crapping on about a mini ice age.

I am sorry for your hailstorm problem, but pinning the world ending on a freak occurrence is never a good idea.

 

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Sir Wearer of Hats
5 hours ago, tmcom said:

Freak occurrences as in hail storms, not smoke haze, which is caused by mismanagement of our park areas, and yes hot days, and a lot of arsonists.

The worst hail storm occurred hundreds of years ago when CO2 was a joke or very low, (overseas) which was at bowling ball scales and destroyed anything in its path, (that means killed most humans and livestock).

 

Worst plague we had was hundreds of years ago, so why worry about this new one? 

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